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Will Casio/Sony use resin on there future laser heads?

blrock

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Having worked with IBM products over the past 15 years I've tried countless times to extract the laser diodes out their fiber products. (I know there is not much use for lasers at these wavelengths) These include, HBA's, fiber switches, Midrange fiber cards, SFF's etc. Eveyone one of their laser products have this incredibly hard almost indestructable resin over the diodes. And I say indestructable because no matter how you try chip away at the resin you always damage the diodes.

Do you think government/FDA pressure will make these manufactures do something similar to make class IV lasers more difficult to obtain? I find it hard to believe we'll be able to strip these forthcoming 24 watt white light laser projectors from Sony with such ease. I hope I'm wrong.
 



kiyoukan

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even if they fill the cavitys with something hard to remove there is still aluminum around the laser.
We would resort to cutting out square blocks of the heat sinks then rounding them down to the size we need.
We dont "NEED" just the diode we just need a holder.
We would use the metal is set in.
It makes things harder but we will still get what we want.
and heck with that rosin and metal it will be a better heatsink then the brass ones we use now.
Its just a matter of time before someone tracks down the individual lasers and we wont even need the projectors.
 

Flaminpyro

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I have access to a 15 watt Co2 laser that can do the job nicely :D
 

ossumguywill

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have you tried hot acetone to melt the resin? Not too hot mind you, don't want to reach the flash point :D
 

HaloBlu

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The resin on these diodes covers the pins too I presume. Can they driven directly without extracting?
I know they certainly may make it much harder to extract but we won't go down easily. Perhaps not as many will still have the skill to extract or access the pins but others will.

More worried about ****** counter measures that might be developed due to governments demands.
The right acid (handled properly) can cleanly reveal the silicon & bond wires of an IC chip.
 
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Things

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I think the ultimate weapon would be to mount the laser dies directly to the heatsink, except they'd have to be working with Nichia for that ...
 

HaloBlu

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No idea, I don't use acids of that level & they warn against combining acetone with acid.
 

HIMNL9

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have you tried hot acetone to melt the resin? Not too hot mind you, don't want to reach the flash point :D
Ehm ..... do you know that acetone flashpoint is less than 20C, right ? ..... and that, at this temperature, a mix of 3% or more with air, is already an explosive gas mix ? ..... :eek:

I strongly suggest to NOT play with hot acetone (or with acetone of any temperature, if for that), in no ways, where there is also a minimum risk of a free spark or flame (different thing if you're using a sealed condensation tank, ofcourse).
 

lasersbee

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Yeah... that's what we need...
Take the danger of the uninformed moronic 1 Watt Laser user
blinding/hurting people out of the headlines and replace it with
Nitric Acid/Acetone Explosions, Fire a death....:whistle:

I wouldn't be using those chemicals without an intensive course
on how to use them safely...:eek:

Jerry
 

FireMyLaser

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I got an idea how to prevent us from getting the diodes out, but I don't want to post how in case they'd hear about it. :D :shhh:
 

ElektroFreak

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That was my first thought as well.. Are we trying to ensure we never have access to these kinds of diodes again? 'Cause this thread is a brilliant start. The folks making those kinds of decisions DO pay attention to LPF.. especially now that they know we are harvesting from their products.
 

UniversalTrooper

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One problem with making it hard to extract the diodes, is that it also makes it hard to repair the lamp module. It's a pretty expensive part to be made deliberately monolithic non-repairable. If the company can't refurbish the lamp module, it will make repairs under warranty a lot more expensive for them.
 




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