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I didnt believe it, till I saw it. Submerged PC.

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Water isn't really conductive either; it's usually the ions dissolved in the water that cause conductivity.
 
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No kidding? I did not know that. I think I missed that in science class. I was always taught wet things, and electricity did not mix well.
 

Crazy Jay

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No kidding? I did not know that. I think I missed that in science class. I was always taught wet things, and electricity did not mix well.
That's because they didn't teach you that in school... I had no idea either. From what I just looked up its the minerals in water. They said pure or distilled water isn't conductive. Why didn't they just use that instead?
 
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No kidding? I did not know that. I think I missed that in science class. I was always taught wet things, and electricity did not mix well.
Technically, pure water is still slightly conductive; however, it's small enough to be negligible.

They said pure or distilled water isn't conductive. Why didn't they just use that instead?
I think it's because water has a tendency to cause corrosion (rust, oxidation, etc). This in turn could lead to ions in the water and conductance. Also, microorganisms like to grow in water unless you keep it filtered or disinfected...
 
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Crazy Jay

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The fridge would be air tight. No condensation. Refrigerators these days dehumidify

EDIT: Yeah the pure water would be a bad idea then. I didn't think of that
 
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Wierd I thought condensation only formed on things cooler than the ambient temperature...
Your are right, but what if you had the CPU under load and it went up in temp. When it cooled back down would the air around it condensate? :thinking:

EDIT: I just read that post about fridges being air tight.

PS: But if you had to repair/remove some hardware, then it would condensate.
 
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Crazy Jay

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You just let the fridge warm up if you need to change hardware... being a small fridge it wouldn't take long

EDIT: Or you could let the computer run while the fridge is off as well to heat it up to normal temp.
 

Asherz

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There's a few of these builds on youtube, they're cool but messy and you wouldn't be able to move your parts back into a normal case without a lot of cleaning.
 

Benm

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Technically, pure water is still slightly conductive; however, it's small enough to be negligible.
That depends on the application, but it IS correct.

Both the concept that water is a good conductor, and the concept that it is no conductor at all, are false. One issue is that all liquids (and solids) show conduction to some extent, but pure water is still orders of mangnitude more conductive than mineral oil.

The 2 H2O <--> H3O+ / OH- equilibirium is responsible for this.

Don't go submerge electronics in ultrapure water though. Conducitivy from the above mechanism might allow it, but if it is contact with air, water will quickly absorb CO2 from the air, dropping the pH to 5-6 or so, and increasing conductivity wildly due to dissolved H3O+ and carbonate.
 

KiLLrB

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That depends on the application, but it IS correct.

Both the concept that water is a good conductor, and the concept that it is no conductor at all, are false. One issue is that all liquids (and solids) show conduction to some extent, but pure water is still orders of mangnitude more conductive than mineral oil.

The 2 H2O <--> H3O+ / OH- equilibirium is responsible for this.

Don't go submerge electronics in ultrapure water though. Conducitivy from the above mechanism might allow it, but if it is contact with air, water will quickly absorb CO2 from the air, dropping the pH to 5-6 or so, and increasing conductivity wildly due to dissolved H3O+ and carbonate.

Hmmm I learned something today lol. I hope for everyones sake nobody is actually considering submerging a computer in water. I really dont see it happening but you never know.
 
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Hmmm I learned something today lol. I hope for everyones sake nobody is actually considering submerging a computer in water. I really dont see it happening but you never know.
It would make one hell of a unique computer. I'm sure with some thick Plexiglas you could make a much more manageable case. Throw a few pulsing green LEDs in there, and you'd have a case straight from the movie Alien.
 




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