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Get Some Safety Goggles Now!

Flaminpyro

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I got a kick out of it :crackup:

EDIT post 4646

His rep doesn't matter. I'm not saying his build sucks or anything like that. I was simply pointing out how he pulled a dick move by blocking me. No one here will tell you it's safe to stare at a beam in doors from a 2W laser. I wasn't saying the beam itself could blind you, but the possible light reflection off a shiny object or something. Of course I really didn't have an opportunity to say that. Figured some might get a kick out of it, guess I was wrong...
 
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Eudaimonium

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His rep doesn't matter. I'm not saying his build sucks or anything like that. I was simply pointing out how he pulled a dick move by blocking me. No one here will tell you it's safe to stare at a beam in doors from a 2W laser. I wasn't saying the beam itself could blind you, but the possible light reflection off a shiny object or something. Of course I really didn't have an opportunity to say that. Figured some might get a kick out of it, guess I was wrong...
So the entire point you're trying to make is that high powered lasers are dangerous.

Not to sound rude man but we kinda sorta already know that. All of us.

Also, I would really like to point out that diffuse reflections for <2W lasers aren't actually dangerous under normal circuimstances. You can do math if you don't trust me, but 2W laser is perfectly safe to view without protection goggles indoors, unless you are staring into the dot, eyes wide open, at one foot of distance for 20 minutes, at which point you have a whole lot of other problems in your life and may as well stare into whatever lasers you want.

I'm all for advertising responsible usage and safety of high powered lasers that are ever more readily available, but sometimes people here are pushing it.

The fact that at one point or other, viewing the *beam* itself from Class IV laser was questioned to be safe or not, kinda speaks something.
 

slipknottrivium

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I've bought my first laser this week which was a 30mw 532 from Odicforce along with two pairs of safety goggles at 532nm OD 4 and also 650nm. I was wondering if there is any kind of lee way with the wavelength of goggles. I'll probably be making another purchase soon of a 220mw 655nm laser.
 
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tsk1979

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I think if I am pointing a 2W blue laser at the open sky, I can safely look at the beam without issues, right?
However, looking at the dot even from 20 feet away esp on a white wall is no no!
 

bungy

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I think if I am pointing a 2W blue laser at the open sky, I can safely look at the beam without issues, right?
However, looking at the dot even from 20 feet away esp on a white wall is no no!
Yes, you can look at the beam with no protection, and no don't look at the dot on any surface that close.
 

Bambuko

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I think if I am pointing a 2W blue laser at the open sky, I can safely look at the beam without issues, right?
However, looking at the dot even from 20 feet away esp on a white wall is no no!
You can look at the beam in the sky, but definitely avoid shining it at anything (not just white walls) a couple feet away from you if you don't have safety glasses on.

Frankly, at that power level (2W) I don't think wearing safety glasses even when pointing it at the sky is a bad idea. These things sometimes slip and fall, and it takes a lot less than a second of exposure to fry your retina. It's happened to members here. Sometimes it's good to be paranoid and your eyes are as good of an excuse to be as any imo.
 
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InfinitusEquitas

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I think if I am pointing a 2W blue laser at the open sky, I can safely look at the beam without issues, right?
However, looking at the dot even from 20 feet away esp on a white wall is no no!
Yes, you can look at the beam with no protection, and no don't look at the dot on any surface that close.
The problem with looking at the dot, on a surface nearby is that there is no way for anyone here to predict how reflective that surface is.

With most matte surfaces, beyond a foot or two, the diffuse reflection is harmless.

Unfortunately not all surfaces are matte, and some that may appear to be non reflective, can turn out to reflect quite a bit of light back.

A specular reflection (a direct or partial reflection such as from say a shiny doorknob or window glass) or a direct hit, is what you should be worried about.

Still, while it's probably technically safe, looking at the dot of a 445nm, personally, to me, even on a matte surface, is uncomfortable.

Frankly, at that power level (2W) I don't think wearing safety glasses even when pointing it at the sky is a bad idea. These things sometimes slip and fall, and it takes a lot less than a second of exposure to fry your retina. It's happened to members here. Sometimes it's good to be paranoid and your eyes are as good of an excuse to be as any imo.
Would kind of defeat the whole purpose of getting a laser, since any decent safety goggles will prevent you from seeing the beam. There is a fine line between safety and paranoia. Ultimately it's how you handle the laser, with or without goggles that matters more. Goggles are a last resort safety option, think of them in the same way that you think of seat belts.

Best to just either hold the laser you are using it, or make sure it is stable in such a way that it cannot move/roll.
 
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Spooky

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I was wondering if there is any kind of lee way with the wavelength of goggles.
Not directed at you Slip but this is the very thing I mentioned the other day, give exact information and it's human nature to try and bend it to suit a purpose.

ie:

Fact: "A XX mW laser is safe at 300 feet"

Question: "Oh I just bought one of those is it safe at 299 feet coz that's nearly 300 feet"

Fact: "Possibly"

Question: "Oh so I should be ok then"

Time passes and Question becomes Fact: XXmW laser is safe at 299 feet"

More time passes and new question is "Is my XXmW laser safe at 298 feet"

Thankfully you took the time to ask, some people don't and just assume.

Getting back to the goggles question, they will have a wavelength range marked on them at which they provide the rated protection. Outside of that you could be betting your eyesight on a guess. Like I said my friend, not directed at you but a continuation from a safety point that was raised the other day in another thread.

best wishes

Dave
 
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LaserRRP

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Are These Goggles Any Good?
This thread is intended in response to this question seemingly endlessly repeated in post after post, over and over again. Please feel free to add useful quality content to provide this thread as a reference source for all those seeking adequate appropriate laser safety protective glasses/goggles.

First and foremost - A Welders Hood or Goggles will not provide laser protection for your eyes.

Courtesy of InfinitusEquitas’ signature:

Wikipedia.org - Laser Safety Protective Eyewear


Protective Glasses Testing Threads:

06-30-2012, - TheDukeAnumber1 - BluBlockers vs Red Safety Glasses (Pics Included)

04-12-2012, InfinitusEquitas - Cheap Safety Goggles Destructive Test: Uvex S0360X Ultra-spec 2000

03-23-2012, - grainde - Caution Eagle Pair

02-15-2012, tsteele93 - Cheap Safety Glasses - TESTED
I was looking around they got some on Ebay but most of them look kinda cheap and to be made overseas. I ended up buying some at Phillips Safety | Leading Manufacturer of Occupational Safety Products I think i got a good deal 20% off when I called. I found some cheaper but they quality didn't look as good.
 

meldon

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Trying to get my head around OD vs wave length specs.

I believe an OD rating is what calcutes the power that will get through after the filter of a set wave length.

so an example, my 2W diode vs OD6 on the 808nm wavelength (same as the diode) pair of glasses would allow 2 micro Watts of power through. (2W/1*10^6)

Is this correct or have I completely got the wrong end of the stick?
 

Bionic-Badger

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Yup, that calculation is right. Though remember that the OD rating is a simplified ANSI Z136 rating standard for goggles. I think the rating is for continuous-wave (CW) lasers, and I'm not too sure what the power density figures for that are. The EN207 ratings are more specific for different laser operations (e.g. CW, pulsed).

The idea behind the ANSI OD-rating system is to simplify the safety rating so that an operator could just know the power output of the laser and choose an OD rating based on that. The manufacturers are responsible for performing the tests and certifications according to the standard's guidelines.

For the lasers you're likely to encounter the OD rating should suffice.
 

InfinitusEquitas

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Theoretically yes, those should work great, but I don't know how much I would trust zonestealth. The link they provide for additional data does not lead anywhere.
 

InfinitusEquitas

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Just a friendly bump reminder. Please make sure you're wearing the right set of goggles. Otherwise...



(I was setting up a few lasers for a picture, switched from a 445 to a 638 and forgot to swap goggles. Good thing the laser was in a tripod, and secure :eek:)
 

bobo99

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What OD rating should one get for the 445nm 3W diodes that we are tinkering with?

Edit: Techinically O.D 5 will bring down the power of a 3.2W to 3.2mW. So O.D 5 or higher?
 
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Pi R Squared

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What OD rating should one get for the 445nm 3W diodes that we are tinkering with?

Edit: Techinically O.D 5 will bring down the power of a 3.2W to 3.2mW. So O.D 5 or higher?
I think your math is off by two zeros, someone correct me if I am wrong, doesn't OD 4 reduce the light to 1/10000th and OD 5 to 1/100000th, I am sure I read this somewhere. Or am I off by one zero?

Anyway OD 4+ is good enough for a 3.2W laser, at least for viewing the dot up close, but at 3.2W I wouldn't trust just any glasses to protect from a direct hit.

Alan
 




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