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Get Some Safety Goggles Now!

madmacmo

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Are These Goggles Any Good?
This thread is intended in response to this question seemingly endlessly repeated in post after post, over and over again. Please feel free to add useful quality content to provide this thread as a reference source for all those seeking adequate appropriate laser safety protective glasses/goggles.

First and foremost - A Welders Hood or Goggles will not provide laser protection for your eyes.

Courtesy of InfinitusEquitas’ signature:
Wikipedia.org - Laser Safety Protective Eyewear
Laser goggles
The use of eye protection when operating lasers of classes 3B and 4 in a manner that may result in eye exposure in excess of the MPE is required in the workplace by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

Protective eyewear in the form of spectacles or goggles with appropriately filtering optics can protect the eyes from the reflected or scattered laser light with a hazardous beam power, as well as from direct exposure to a laser beam. Eyewear must be selected for the specific type of laser, to block or attenuate in the appropriate wavelength range. For example, eyewear absorbing 532 nm typically has an orange appearance, transmitting wavelengths larger than 550 nm. Such eyewear would be useless as protection against a laser emitting at 800 nm. Furthermore, some lasers emit more than one wavelength of light, and this may be a particular problem with some less expensive frequency-doubled lasers, such as 532 nm "green laser pointers" which are commonly pumped by 808 nm infrared laser diodes, and also generate an intermediate 1064 nm laser beam which is used to produce the final 532 nm output. If the IR radiation is allowed into the beam, which happens in some green laser pointers, it will in general not be blocked by regular red or orange colored protective eyewear designed for pure green or already IR-filtered beam. Special YAG laser and dual-frequency eyewear is available for work with frequency-doubled YAG and other IR lasers which have a visible beam, but it is more expensive, and IR-pumped green laser products do not always specify whether such extra protection is needed.[21][22]

Eyewear is rated for optical density (OD), which is the base-10 logarithm of the attenuation factor by which the optical filter reduces beam power. For example, eyewear with OD 3 will reduce the beam power in the specified wavelength range by a factor of 1,000. In addition to an optical density sufficient to reduce beam power to below the maximum permissible exposure (see above), laser eyewear used where direct beam exposure is possible should be able to withstand a direct hit from the laser beam without breaking. The protective specifications (wavelengths and optical densities) are usually printed on the goggles, generally near the top of the unit. In the European Community, manufacturers are required by European norm EN 207 to specify the maximum power rating rather than the optical density.
Protective Glasses Testing Threads:

06-30-2012, - TheDukeAnumber1 - BluBlockers vs Red Safety Glasses (Pics Included)

03-23-2012, - grainde - Caution Eagle Pair

02-15-2012, tsteele93 - Cheap Safety Glasses - TESTED

Caution the following Uvex glasses Do Not provide protection for green or red lasers and must be tested when received for blocking 405nm 450nm to insure a "formula change" in manufacturing has not rendered them useless for the "blue" wave lengths as well
04-12-2012, InfinitusEquitas - Cheap Safety Goggles Destructive Test: Uvex S0360X Ultra-spec 2000


Princeton.edu - Eye Absorption Site vs. Wavelength
The wavelength determines where the laser energy is absorbed in the eye.

Lasers in the visible and near infrared range of the spectrum have the greatest potential for retinal injury, as the cornea and the lens are transparent to those wavelengths and the lens can focus the laser energy onto the retina. The maximum absorption of laser energy onto the retina occurs in the range from 400 - 550 nm. Argon and YAG lasers operate in this range, making them the most hazardous lasers with respect to eye injuries. Wavelengths of less than 550 nm can cause a photochemical injury similar to sunburn. Photochemical effects are cumulative and result from long exposures (over 10 seconds) to diffuse or scattered light. Table 3 summarizes the most likely effects of overexposure to various commonly used lasers.

Proof Goggles Are Worth It:
09-13-2012 - Hit in the eye with 2.35 Watts. Had goggles on ...
07-13-2012 - Post Your Close Calls
02-10-2012 - Re: 532 Googles with Prescription Glasses
01-04-2012 - Too Damn Close
03-12-2011 - Took a 450mW beam shot last night.
02-17-2011 - Re: Review on Eagle 190nm-540nm OD4 Laser Safety Goggles From Survival Lasers.!
02-06-2010 - Thank you Glenn; you saved my sight
01-29-2010 - Re: Laser goggles! Which should I buy?
12-03-2008 - Re: Are Dragonlasers goggles legit?

Notable Level of Hazard Posts:
06-06-2012 - Danger of scattered laser light?
06-02-2012 - How quickly can a high powered laser blind a person?
03-16-2012 - What Actually Damages Your Eye?
01-30-2012 - Laser Safety Guide for Newcomers - How to safely lase!
01-11-2012 - The Facts about Eye damages - or What is (not) safe ?
01-13-2012 - How far is far enough for the human eye?
07-30-2011 - Why do we have to use laser safety goggles?
01-25-2011 - Kinect Safety...?
08-20-2010 - ACTUAL eye damage threshholds?
12-27-2009 - Real Eye Damage

Laser Eye Strikes & Vision Impact Posts:
11-17-2013 - Laser Reflection Induced Scotoma
09-15-2012 - Eye Damage Question
08-12-2012 - 300mW green can do harm from several meters
08-03-2012 - Dumb friend shined a laser in my eye
07-12-2012 - Did this laser damage my eyes?
06-02-2012 - How quickly can a high powered laser blind a person?
04-16-2012 - Green Laser shined in my eye
02-13-2012 - Looked at dot of a 2w Laser - Eye damage?
12-29-2011 - Paranoid: Will I have eye damage?
12-06-2011 - Hit in eye with 1000mw 445nm blue laser
10-26-2011 - You think lasers are a for fun?
10-08-2011 - eye damage by 50mw?
09-04-2011 - Could I have damaged my eyes?
07-14-2011 - 50mw laser eye damage
01-21-2011 - Ouch! Hurts so much!
12-24-2010 - 15mw laser hit me in my eye.
07-09-2009 - So I went to the Optometrist Today...
02-03-2009 - Laser Eye Damage


Help Plz, Laser In Eye 01-14-2014, 02:04 PM
Disclaimer- anything said here by myself is not intended to be taken as medical advice and/or treatment and does not constitute a traditional doctor/patient relationship. It is for educational and entertainment purposes only. You should always seek the attention of your own personal physician for medical services.

Hate that I have to do that.....

I should also state that I am not an ophthalmologist but I do have specific knowledge of this area and have access to the latest publications.

There is a few decent publicly available articles available on the web regarding retinal and general laser eye injuries, you can search for "accidental retina laser injury" or similar and come up with quite a few good reads.

In general, most serious laser injuries do not respond very favorably to any specific treatments. That means "wear your eye protection!" Because not only is prevention the best treatment, it is really the only treatment. There are different grading scales of injury that range from essentially a "stunned" retina all the way to full out necrosis and coagulation of the back of the eyeball. What makes eyes and lasers like matches and gasoline is the retina is a very sensitive and fragile organ that exposes itself to the outside world through a magnifying lens. Everything you are looking at right now, your entire visual field, is focused on an area in the order of a few millimeters. The most sensitive and densely packed area that gives you your precision of acuity is only a small fraction of this area near the middle of the focused light coming onto the retina. So, most of what allows you to see precisely and do things like read and recognize images is all in the area of a few square millimeters. Next, it has this big thing in front of it called a lens, a big magnifying lens. Add this with collimated light between 400 and 1400nm with measurable power and you have the perfect makings for a disastrous outcome. The laser, already highly concentrated, is focused even more onto a very small and important area that lacks the ability to regenerate itself like some other tissues and organs do.

Early studies of laser injury to the retina proved it only took about 7 to 10 mW to cause measurable damage to the Rhesus monkey's retina. Although there is some dependence on wavelength, in general it doesn't take but three to four times this to cause irreparable injury in some. There are many factors that play into how much power causes how much damage to a certain individual including lens age and clarity, astigmatism, myopia, and length of exposure. It is pretty intuitive that the lower the power the more time of exposure is required to cause retinal injury. Put all this aside and just realize it doesn't take much, especially with the power most of us tend to play with around here. When you're talking about watts your blink protective response is useless to prevent damage. You can't blink fast enough at this level of power, all the damage is done before the first neuron in the reflex pathway releases it's neurotransmitters into the next synapse. Forget the next few milliseconds it requires to activate the muscle and close the lid, the retina is already fried.

Painful? Sorry Charlie. Rarely are laser injuries gauged by perceived pain, they are generally painless with a few exceptions. Your now just blind in your visual field where that part of the retina is now a necrotic and coagulated area of soon to be irreversible scar tissue without function.

At this point a few treatments have been attempted like high dose steroids and non-steroidal anti-inflamitoies. None of these have been proven effective at doing much. The thought being that the resulting area of inflammation around the laser burn may continue to be damaged and the visual loss may even increase with time, these drugs may be of benefit but none have been proven so. Interestingly, sometimes laser surgery can be used to try to remove some of the scar tissue affecting the surrounding retina but this has limited benefit too. There are lesser degrees of damage that can occur and cause irreparable injury over a longer time than a flash burn takes. Here again, while this has been identified as a process of damage, not much seems to be helpful. Steroids are a often tried but some now think this may be counterproductive. There are other mechanisms of damage that occur as a late phenomenon that are too technical to describe here, but the point of bringing this up is that it may be useful to see an eye doctor to try to identify these processes and minimize their impact.

So far I have only described retinal injury. There are other parts of the eye that can be damaged as well. Although not as dramatic initially, they can also prove to be debilitating and even disfiguring. Scleral burns, cataracts, and even possibly glaucoma may result.

So, if you think you've fried your retina, be sure to make the trip to the doctor useful by stopping along the way to pick up some eye safety wear. That will likely be the best outcome from a trip to the ophthalmologist, preventing your next injury. Other than staging your injury, not much else is likely to be of much benefit from him or her.

Here is a little suggestion for the newbie thinking of building or buying one of these fabulous lasers we enjoy around here. If what I've just said above is the first time you've heard about these injuries then you are probably not ready to own one. You probably haven't read the stickies in the areas about safety and eye protection. This is a must before attempting to build or buy one of these cool 445nm 2w handhelds, or any other laser over a few watts you couldn't easily buy at the local corner store.

I think it's worth repeating, prevention is the best medicine because in the end, it's really the only good medicine when it comes to laser injuries. God only gave you about 4 to 5 square millimeters of retina to last a lifetime. Don't show Him and all of us here how foolish and ungrateful you are by wasting them over a few seconds of excitement without taking the time to learn how to protect them first.
Too Stupid to Own a Laser
Idiot with a Laser
Moron with a Laser
Shining Laser into Eye
Pointing Laser into Eye
Blinded by Laser
Laser Eye Injury
Laser Damaged Vision
 
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grainde

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I know its amazing how many new threads pop up day after day with this same question! Hopefully people will now see this, before they post. :gj: and +1 :beer:

Edit: Maybe this should be made a sticky?
 
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InfinitusEquitas

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Great thread! I vote for sticky too.

Going to re-link my signature to include it :)
 
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Zeebit

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InfinitusEquitas

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This doesn't mean much... but in the first picture you can even see blue light on the other side of the lens.
 

Zeebit

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Yes. That is the purpose of safety glasses. Avoid that and get the one I linked you or take a look at InfinitusEquita's signature. He has a lot of links to quality safety glasses.
 

Bionic-Badger

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I tried telling someone how they could go blind by looking at a beam from a 1.3W laser and the pathetic loser blocks me from his videos....
Rage-inspired BURNING Steampunk Laser Revolver - YouTube
I don't know if he modified the video after your message, but there is a notice at the beginning -- albeit short -- that says you should wear eye protection.

It is pretty cool, but I get wary any time someone puts a laser into a gun form-factor. It makes people see the laser as a dangerous weapon, not just a dangerous scientific or hobby device.
 
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it was more about the conversation I had. Once I was showing I was right over the subject he blocks me from commenting.
 

InfinitusEquitas

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His rep doesn't matter. I'm not saying his build sucks or anything like that. I was simply pointing out how he pulled a dick move by blocking me. No one here will tell you it's safe to stare at a beam in doors from a 2W laser. I wasn't saying the beam itself could blind you, but the possible light reflection off a shiny object or something. Of course I really didn't have an opportunity to say that. Figured some might get a kick out of it, guess I was wrong...
 
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