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Wtf is this???

ARG

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I doubt it would be mold or bacterial growth, as copper is fairly toxic to such microorganisms and they usually don't grow that fast anway.

It's what makes copper IUD's possible :D
 



lasertechgear

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It was never exposed to any liquids and other copper heat sinks and modules I've had on the same carpet within inches do not have the same growth/deposit. I have also lazed this crud on a pair of needle nose pliers that I had and it began to cover a larger and larger area the more I tried to laze it off. Here's the same thing, but on the carpet..

11587-20160630-024540.jpg


I didn't laze that big ass crater either.. these things appear to expel a large amount of flames as I laze them.. they literally go up completely immersed in a fireball until either I blow it out or it just stops.. I've seen this fireball last for nearly a minute.

I decided to throw down a black sheet, today, on top of the carpet just to cover those things up cause they're grossing me out.. but guess what, some have grown THROUGH the black sheet and others are just sprinkled all over it. I've noticed that when I burn some of these on my sheet they will burn very quickly and vanish.. but what's happening is it will go from a solid to a liquid and it soaks into the linen. I get the same result as the images you're seeing when I burn the sheet - the carpet below looks the same as the previous images.
 
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lasertechgear

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On the topic of the weird 'things' that you've seen and tried to burn with limited success; maybe you opened a portal playing with those high power lasers. I told you not to cross the beams! :tsk:

lol.. the thought has honestly crossed my mind. Luckily I've had others notice so I know I'm not losin it.. or we're just all goin nuts. Just as I was reading your responses one of my plastic bags full of trash moved and then a heard what sounded like small pebbles dropping onto a piece of styrofoam I've removed from the box containing a new computer desk that I'm about to assemble. Last night when the same trash bag moved I looked under it and I saw one of them not so fun guys..
 

Bionic-Badger

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It almost looks like metal when it's been hit with a lot of hot sparks from a grinder or something. Have you been doing some metalworking or something that creates sparks?
 

Kethiju

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If that is copper, that almost certainly isn't corrosion. There are very few acids hat can disrupt the bonds of precious metals. The acids that can are EXTREMELY dangerous. Also, since the OP said the disturbance seems to move, that suggests an organic compound of some sort. Again, if that is metal, it wouldn't be any form of plant life. Also mention was a prism effect. That narrows the suspects down to a few rare earth metals. Is the object far heavier than its size would suggest? If so, beryllium is most likely. Densest metal known to man.
 

Seoul_lasers

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If that is copper, that almost certainly isn't corrosion. There are very few acids hat can disrupt the bonds of precious metals. The acids that can are EXTREMELY dangerous. Also, since the OP said the disturbance seems to move, that suggests an organic compound of some sort. Again, if that is metal, it wouldn't be any form of plant life. Also mention was a prism effect. That narrows the suspects down to a few rare earth metals. Is the object far heavier than its size would suggest? If so, beryllium is most likely. Densest metal known to man.

@Kethiju,
Beryllium (Be) is extremely lightweight and has a low density of 1.85 g/cm3.
The densest metal is Osmium at 22.59g/cm3.
I'd go back and re-look your periodic table of elements.


I'm pretty sure what I see here is some sort of salt crackle. If you heat salt(s) up hot enough they liquefy and and cause a crackle like this as they cool down.
Hydroxides (esp.) Sodium and Potassium Hydroxide can do this at lower temperatures, relatively speaking.

Another possibility is a partially cured / scorched alumina thermal epoxy..


There's more to this story I think. :thinking:
 
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Kethiju

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@Kethiju,
Beryllium (Be) is extremely lightweight and has a low density of 1.85 g/cm3.
The densest metal is Osmium at 22.59g/cm3.
I'd go back and re-look your periodic table of elements.


I'm pretty sure what I see here is some sort of salt crackle. If you heat salt(s) up hot enough they liquefy and and cause a crackle like this as they cool down.
Hydroxides (esp.) Sodium and Potassium Hydroxide can do this at lower temperatures, relatively speaking.

Another possibility is a partially cured / scorched alumina thermal epoxy..


There's more to this story I think. :thinking:

I goofed. Bismuth was the one I was after.
 
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I'm going with melted carpet. He layed the unit down hot, melted the carpet onto the module then he admitted he tried to burn it off with a laser and it caused the cratering effect.
 




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