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1W 525nm Diodes!

LSRFAQ

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It is quite odd. I wonder if there is a legitimate reason, or if some guy just felt like being an asshole to everyone making RGB's. Or even anyone making green lasers who have to think twice about which direction the battery goes.
Its how the die is designed and bonded that determines the layout. As well as tradition going back to the early diodes with built in photo-diodes.

Steve
 

ZRaffleticket

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So tradition pretty much is the problem, sounds like if they wanted to, they could design it to be case (-)... interesting. Thanks Steve!

Mrcrouse, if you make a little more space around the green area you can isolate it from the case. You'll need more wires and more expensive parts but it's doable.
 

Mrcrouse

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Ya, but in isolating it, you also loose the heatsinking that it would normally have. :/
 

Mrcrouse

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This may be the case for lab lasers, but as for my 3 diode host, there isn't really a way to isolate it, and still keep it in its own heatsink.
 
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This is simply the data I've seen so far, what they have made publicly available. Things can and do change all the time, so who knows what production diodes will look like. These are certainly hero devices, and production doesn't happen until you have some amount of yield. But the hero devices are certainly impressive, being an order of magnitude better than everybody else out there.

I am worried about the beam specs - multimode probably, now how long the lines will be?
The diodes Nichia is talking about here are 15um wide, exactly the same as the 445nm blue diodes everyone is using now. So the beam should not be too dissimilar.

And what about efficiency? Voltage? Current?
The data I've seen is for a diode at 525nm, putting out 1.01W at 1.5A and 4.76V, for a wall-plug of 14.1%. That's the rated power/current, the chart they showed went to 1.3W of output power.

Dimensions?

Will that remain the same?
Standard TO cans are a near certainty.



Multimode probable, no way can they multiply output by 10 by increasing efficiency a few %. If they want it for a TV the lines would need to be small to be easy to work with.
See above, multimode likely similar to the current crop of 445nm diodes.

Only the developers know, except the efficiency... In the article they said 1.5 times the efficiency vs the normal diodes, so 9% * 1.5 = 13.5% efficiency.
See above, 14.1% wallplug so far.

We'll need somewhere around 7-12Vin between .7A to 1.3A.
See above, less than 5V.

Case needs to be protecting the die, or else it will oxidize so it'll need to be closed-case.
I'm tired of people saying this when it's simply not true. The can will be closed, sure, but the die will not "oxidize" and die.
 
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Meatball

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So tradition pretty much is the problem, sounds like if they wanted to, they could design it to be case (-)... interesting. Thanks Steve!
No not quite. Its not for the sake of tradition that this design continues, but more for backwards compatibility that it continues. Its all about sticking to a standard design in a standard case with a standard pin-out.

Programming languages like C could also be easier to use if they were tweaked a bit, but because of how it was made way back when, it remains the same so that new and older systems can continue to work together.

I'm tired of people saying this when it's simply not true. The can will be closed, sure, but the die will not "oxidize" and die.
Its more about leaving the facet open to a world of contaminants isn't it? "Degradation" happens optically, not chemically.
 
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DrSid

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4.7V ? It's the same as 445nm (more or less) ? That sounds strange .. different wavelength should have different voltage drop .. it should be roughly between 650 and 445 ..
 

Hiemal

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That is, isn't it?

4.7 volts should be a bit less than 445 nm ones (just barely) but you also need realize that they are not perfectly efficient devices... so I'm guessing they require a tad more voltage as of now (look at the older 515 nm ones, they needed anywhere from 7 to 9 volts!)
 

DrSid

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Hm .. so there might be no relation at all .. interesting ..
On the other hand it's good news, because:
1) it's basically all the same drivers and everything as 445nm
2) it will be possible to direct drive it from 3 AAs .. which I love about 445nm diodes. Yes, those 445nm are pretty tough and these new greens might be not .. but who knows ..
 
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Hiemal

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Hm .. so there might be no relation at all .. interesting ..
On the other hand it's good news, because:
1) it's basically all the same drivers and everything as 445nm
2) it will be possible to direct drive it from 3 AAs .. which I love about 445nm diodes. Yes, those 445nm are pretty tough and these new greens might be not .. but who knows ..
If Nichia could run them at 5 watts and have only degraded life then I wanna say that they can survive 3 AA direct drive. :)
 

ZRaffleticket

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I'm tired of people saying this when it's simply not true. The can will be closed, sure, but the die will not "oxidize" and die.
Never knew that, good to know.

I also estimated all of my numbers based on what we have now, I didn't see ANY forms of datasheets on the diode.
 




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