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what is the most dangerous colour laser ?

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Lotus_Darkrose

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Lol, yes swimminsurfer256. "What is the most dangerous handheld laser" would have actually been a much better question. And that definitely answers that question.
 

Lotus_Darkrose

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I don't understand the reason behind the emote? Is it because of me, or just because the "Sith" is what it is?
 

marihuano

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I was wondering this too. I just want to know which one is more dangerous regardless if its easier to get or its not available as a handheld. Many of you say a mw is te same no matter what wavelength but for example ive noticed 405nm burns much better than green.

So this being said. Which one is more dangerous or can cause more harm?
 
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TuhOz

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I was wondering this too. I just want to know which one is more dangerous regardless if its easier to get or its not available as a handheld. Many of you say a mw is te same no matter what wavelength but for example ive noticed 405nm burns much better than green.

So this being said. Which one is more dangerous or can cause more harm?
Ummm.. Did you read this thread? There's plenty of answers here..

Also, You just bumped 6 months old thread, dont do that.
 
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qumefox

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A milliWatt is is milliWatt regardless of wavelength. The reason shorter wavelengths 'burn' better than longer ones is due to the fact that more of the light is absorbed and converted to heat instead of being reflected. How well a particular wavelength 'burns' is entirely dependent on material your 'burning'

It's the reason co2 lasers are the primary choice for cutting and engraving. the 10600nm wavelength is absorbed by pretty much EVERYTHING.. even glass, etc. There are actually only a small handful of materials that are capable of reflecting it.. gold being one. And even fewer that are transparent to it.. certain salts I believe.
 

Ash

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...
the 10600nm wavelength is absorbed by pretty much EVERYTHING.. even glass, etc. ...
I agree. 10,600nm lasers are the most dangerous.
They are completely invisible, can be in powers over "a million billion watts" (source), and will cook pretty much everything. :bday:
 

Ablaze

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You know.. now that this pointless 6 month old debate has been bumped, I suddenly feel the burning need to chime in.

I feel that there are actually four ways that a laser could be considered dangerous, and only two of them were debated here:

1) deceptiveness - so an IR laser would be the most.
2) raw ability to burn - so UV, or blue

-- here is my new input: --
3) The most dangerous to airplanes and moving vehicles would be the most visible type of laser, so green.
4) To a police officer or in a movie the most dangerous looking laser would be the one you would most likely find on a gun sight... so red.

Taken together this means that every type of laser is the most dangerous laser in some application!
 

Guyfromhe

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A pen style laser could easily poke an eye out whereas a labby is too large and would likely be blocked by your skull, however it's much heavier, but with some effort you could bean someone in the head with it and possibly cause a concussion.

I don't think the color of the laser affects any of those factors... Hell you could paint it purple and it still wouldn't matter.
 

marihuano

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Ummm.. Did you read this thread? There's plenty of answers here..

Also, You just bumped 6 months old thread, dont do that.
Yes I read. As you just said it, theres plenty of answers but nothing really clear until "qumefox" posted. I think it was the most convincing answer of the thread.

I didnt want to open a new thread asking the same thats why i posted here.


I don't think the color of the laser affects any of those factors... Hell you could paint it purple and it still wouldn't matter.
I remember watching a video of a 1W 445nm laser. It burned everything except for a blue balloon. It took a while but it finally got popped. So i think the color and wavelength really affect how fast a laser burns something
 
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Ablaze

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I don't think the color of the laser affects any of those factors... Hell you could paint it purple and it still wouldn't matter.
i think the color and wavelength really affect how fast a laser burns something
His point went over your head and under your feet. Perhaps if you read it again... very.............. very..............


slowly.

Ohh right.. it occurs to me that gas lasers are probably the most dangerous to the environment and diode lasers are probably the biggest choking hazard. Is there any other type of laser out there? I'm sure we could find a way in which it's the most dangerous.
 
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qumefox

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My vote for most dangerous would have to be for x-ray lasers. :D
 
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jimdt7

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I think saying IR is wrong in this case... IR does not have a color.

Out of the visible colors, blue, ~445nm is probably the most dangerous since it's absorbed so well, however going by absorption, shorter 405 purple would be even worse...
It depends on the wavelenght. To say 808nm is a very dim brown colour.
All wavelenghts over 808 are completely invisible to our eyes. :beer:
 

qumefox

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It depends on the wavelenght. To say 808nm is a very dim brown colour.
All wavelenghts over 808 are completely invisible to our eyes. :beer:
I see 808 as red.. just a really dim red. Actually I see everything over 660 as pretty much the same color. The apparent brightness per mW just falls off as the wavelength increases.

And how high up people can 'see' IR depends on the eyeball in question. Not all are 100% identical. People have claimed to be able to 'detect' up to around 900nm I believe. But I don't have their particular brain/eyeball combo, so I can't verify. I just know that since I can see 808nm.. stands to reason I could see 810nm too. :whistle:
 
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