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Need a solvent?

BobMc

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That solvent is only going to work on certain adhesives that they don't tell you which it is effective against. It is ineffective against vinyls, so it seems like a gamble for a quart that costs probably around $35.00, as it only gives wholesale prices for quantities. I wish I had actually tried to find a solvent back when I was in organics lab.
Well I do need to get into them, so if I have to spend a few dollars it's not the end of the world. The upside is if I can get into them I got something real nice.
 
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HydroSean

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That solvent is only going to work on certain adhesives that they don't tell you which it is effective against. It is ineffective against vinyls, so it seems like a gamble for a quart that costs probably around $35.00, as it only gives wholesale prices for quantities. I wish I had actually tried to find a solvent back when I was in organics lab.
While DCM may work better than that adhesive as you stated, my point was that concentrated organic solvents are corrosives, teratogens, carcinogens, and overall pose a significant safety and health hazard. These solvents should only be used by an experienced chemist or related expert. Since he couldn't read the difference between glasses and goggles I strongly urged that he use a less toxic solvent like the ones contractors use. It only makes sense to advise a more safe approach to his problem rather than the more practical approach.
 

paul1598419

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While DCM may work better than that adhesive as you stated, my point was that concentrated organic solvents are corrosives, teratogens, carcinogens, and overall pose a significant safety and health hazard. These solvents should only be used by an experienced chemist or related expert. Since he couldn't read the difference between glasses and goggles I strongly urged that he use a less toxic solvent like the ones contractors use. It only makes sense to advise a more safe approach to his problem rather than the more practical approach.

That's an excellent point. I'm not sure what solvent would work best to remove most two part epoxies, but wish, now, I had taken the time to find out. ;)
 

HydroSean

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Well I do need to get into them, so if I have to spend a few dollars it's not the end of the world. The upside is if I can get into them I got something real nice.
Do the heating and twisting method first, I have high hopes it will work if you can get some torque on it
 

BobMc

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Do the heating and twisting method first, I have high hopes it will work if you can get some torque on it
I will be trying until I figure out what works. Got my work cut out for me, but it will keep be busy and out of trouble for awhile.:)
 
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GSS

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. That's a great idea!! I've got a couple of dead 301 lieing around ( don't ask you'd only laugh ) there's another member that gave me the name of a solvent that might work. So I'm going to try to get some and I'll try it out first on a dead one. Thanks super advice!
If its something like I would do is probably letting my cat smack it off the table or just letting it roll off:whistle:
Nice to have your down time ready and keeping out of trouble:)
 

BobMc

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If its something like I would do is probably letting my cat smack it off the table or just letting it roll off:whistle:
Nice to have your down time ready and keeping out of trouble:)
No, dumber, If I could blame it on the cat, I could save face.:tinfoil:
 

GSS

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Well I got my 532 301 apart, way easier than I thought at least on this one. I lucked out by having some hollow round AL laying around that fit perfect over the board to the back of the module and just cut out a slot to clear the button switch after I took out the plastic support. I didn't want to bend the driver back because the button is actually kinda long. I used the battery host tube extention on the diode end and with a C clamp it just slide out. Didn't see any glue.
That's not the best part though, it has a ok heatsink and the driver has a pot:)
Pman if you see this "the driver has a pot"!!
 
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Sorry if I missed any important posts. I have very limited time right now so I'm going to try and be quick.

You say that you have a wicked laser that you want to disassemble. You didn't specify which model in OP. Based on a few posts I skimmed, I assume its an Arctic. The reason this is important is because, WL had changed just about every model they ever made at least a couple times. So, disassembly can be a breeze or a nightmare. Most times it is a nightmare, especially if you want to keep your host in good shape.

Now I have never personally disassembled any Arctic hosts but I have seen a few. Most of the Arctics (if not, all) are press fitted fairly tightly. It is NOT easy to get them apart without damage. Some of them may even be pressed together with epoxy too. I've had a few of those too... (RIP).

If you plan on disassembling an Arctic, you should take your sweet time. Make yourself a wooden jig and hold the host with some thick leather and use LOTS of force to seperate the pieces. The leather will protect the host and the wooden vice is a little more forgiving if you slip. I have used a metal vice to seperate host parts and have damaged hosts because the leather has RIPPED! Heat and cooling also helps. Heat one side and cool the other while attempting to seperate the pieces. This will give you the best chance. In the case its epoxied... Good luck :/.

Daguin has successfully seperated a few first gen Arctics. He's probably your best bet on help.

Good luck, and please do share your results if you succeed.
Jeff

Edit: I also wanted to touch on solvents. I have tried softening up the epoxy WL uses with a few different organic solvents of different grades. I can confirm (as others have said) that organic solvents have little to no effect on epoxy. Don't waste your money or time on them
 
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BobMc

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Well I got my 532 301 apart, way easier than I thought at least on this one. I lucked out by having some hollow round AL laying around that fit perfect over the board to the back of the module and just cut out a slot to clear the button switch after I took out the plastic support. I didn't want to bend the driver back because the button is actually kinda long. I used the battery host tube extention on the diode end and with a C clamp it just slide out. Didn't see any glue.
That's not the best part though, it has a ok heatsink and the driver has a pot:)
Pman if you see this "the driver has a pot"!!
I'm glad for you GSS, It's really nice when things work out, makes up for the times when the cat breaks stuff. What are your plans for your 301? I figured out how to get into a Evo and a Nano' the Nano is surprisingly easy.
Just take off the lens cap, than the little lens cover under the cap, grab a dowel the size of the battery compartment stick in up the battery compartment give a medium size wack and everything pops out the top. Comes out looking like a Laser66 module everything hooked together, module,driver and spring all together. ( and there's a pot too ) my diode was still good ( until the cat over drove it and she went to laser heaven ) which meant the problem was else where. But the host is real nice, thinking about what to replace it with. The Evo is a bit more difficult, planning on making a post on how later on. Darn that cat !! ----------------------------------------edit, just remember when you pop the module out the top of the Nano, pay attention to the small black side switch she wants to go somewhere. ( mine still hiding)
 
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BobMc

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Sorry if I missed any important posts. I have very limited time right now so I'm going to try and be quick.

You say that you have a wicked laser that you want to disassemble. You didn't specify which model in OP. Based on a few posts I skimmed, I assume its an Arctic. The reason this is important is because, WL had changed just about every model they ever made at least a couple times. So, disassembly can be a breeze or a nightmare. Most times it is a nightmare, especially if you want to keep your host in good shape.

Now I have never personally disassembled any Arctic hosts but I have seen a few. Most of the Arctics (if not, all) are press fitted fairly tightly. It is NOT easy to get them apart without damage. Some of them may even be pressed together with epoxy too. I've had a few of those too... (RIP).

If you plan on disassembling an Arctic, you should take your sweet time. Make yourself a wooden jig and hold the host with some thick leather and use LOTS of force to seperate the pieces. The leather will protect the host and the wooden vice is a little more forgiving if you slip. I have used a metal vice to seperate host parts and have damaged hosts because the leather has RIPPED! Heat and cooling also helps. Heat one side and cool the other while attempting to seperate the pieces. This will give you the best chance. In the case its epoxied... Good luck :/.

Daguin has successfully seperated a few first gen Arctics. He's probably your best bet on help.

Good luck, and please do share your results if you succeed.
Jeff

Edit: I also wanted to touch on solvents. I have tried softening up the epoxy WL uses with a few different organic solvents of different grades. I can confirm (as others have said) that organic solvents have little to no effect on epoxy. Don't waste your money or time on them
I got into a Lunar this morning but did damage to the host, marred it up a bit, still usable, but got some scratches, thinking about getting some of those strap wrenches, don't know if they will hold but I used pipe wrenches and a t-shirt, worked but needs to be neater. Planning on making a post when I get it worked out.
 
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GSS

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So BobMc, the cat took your "truck" keys and ran the laser over. That's one smart cat;)
Glad you got your first host apart and figured out a way but maby use a C clamp instead of a little whacking. I did try a little of that too at first but don't think I dislodged the crystal.
Just going to play with the pot on the 301.
 

BobMc

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So BobMc, the cat took your "truck" keys and ran the laser over. That's one smart cat;)
Glad you got your first host apart and figured out a way but maby use a C clamp instead of a little whacking. I did try a little of that too at first but don't think I dislodged the crystal.
Just going to play with the pot on the 301.
Question; How could you use a c-clamp to push the dowel into the host? The host is 8" long, the dowel has to go in straight, if you used a c-clamp wouldn't it be going in on an angle? I'm up for new/safer ways, so if you got something that would work better I'm listening because these Nanos host are real nice, would like to save/rebuild them.( p.s. the cat turned up the input to the diode to high and she give up the ghost, darn cat!!! she was probably trying to see how bright see could get the diode, (she's not to bright), but I bet the diode was before she went pop!!) -------------------------------- edit, think I know how you are using the clamp, I was thinking you had to push the module all the way out, which meant you needed the end open to the air. With the clamp you just move it enough to brake the seal and pull it out with your fingers. ( much safer and better) thanks!
 
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Pman

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I have used the dowel whack method on things and in general it has worked on some things.
You can try whacking different parts as long as thE whacked part is protected from damage such as using a rubber mallet.
The thickness of the leather matters a lot for wrapping it around where you are going to use aggressive pliers. You can get leather cheap from stores like salvation army as there will likely be lots of belts and pocket books just check the tag as you really want leather.
Another trick I used once trying to get the guts out of an Inova flashlight was filling an end with water, screwing down the end cap and then putting it in a freezer. If it's waterproof tremendous pressure uilds up and it will expand enough to start pushing out. I had to do it maybe 5 times as it would only move a small amount each time but it apsolutely worked.
Strap wrenches are just OK to work with as they like to slip and stretch but they are great to have the bigger the object is. Even Harbor Freight sells them. You will get way more grip and torque though using the right thickness leather with toothy long pliers especially if where you are trying to grip isn't smooth. Best pliers I've ever come across are these:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000X4KNTG/ref=mp_s_a_1_4?
Knipex cobra pliers are not cheap but man are they great. Of course if your cat marks up the host really bad there's always large pipe wrenches lol. Combining heat or cold or both together with these techniques is a plus.
I've tried some solvents and for the most part they just make a mess and don't do much at all.
Another possible way is using wood in either end and trying to bend each end in opposite directions to help break a seal. What I've done for years to remove the sometimes glued in front cap on a laser pen without damaging it is to use a small piece of leather over the cap with pliers and while holding the pen body with the back half unscrewed you rock the cap while also pulling and rotating the position of where you are gripping the cap so it will break the glue seal and work it's way out. I've never had one I couldn't remove with this method and still leave no mark on the cap.
The reason why you unscrew the back half is the glued or pressed in piece that has the threads on it may come out instead or it could move and lose its position so when you screw it back on the clip will no longer align like it should with the button. You can remove that piece by rocking the 2 sections against each other if you want to make a shorter pen that only uses one battery. Cut the host with that piece out to the right length and then with it screwed back in the other side you just press it back together.
An alternative and easier way to make a short pen is to pop the back end piece out by inserting a dowel or whatever into the back half and smack the dowel end down and the back piece will pop out. Then you just take the clip off and cut the back end down so a single battery will fit right and press the back end piece back in. The only thing tricky is getting the length cut right and not slipping and marking up the pen at the cut plus obviously you want the cut to be perfect so the cap fits like the original.
 

BobMc

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I have used the dowel whack method on things and in general it has worked on some things.
You can try whacking different parts as long as thE whacked part is protected from damage such as using a rubber mallet.
The thickness of the leather matters a lot for wrapping it around where you are going to use aggressive pliers. You can get leather cheap from stores like salvation army as there will likely be lots of belts and pocket books just check the tag as you really want leather.
Another trick I used once trying to get the guts out of an Inova flashlight was filling an end with water, screwing down the end cap and then putting it in a freezer. If it's waterproof tremendous pressure uilds up and it will expand enough to start pushing out. I had to do it maybe 5 times as it would only move a small amount each time but it apsolutely worked.
Strap wrenches are just OK to work with as they like to slip and stretch but they are great to have the bigger the object is. Even Harbor Freight sells them. You will get way more grip and torque though using the right thickness leather with toothy long pliers especially if where you are trying to grip isn't smooth. Best pliers I've ever come across are these:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000X4KNTG/ref=mp_s_a_1_4?
Knipex cobra pliers are not cheap but man are they great. Of course if your cat marks up the host really bad there's always large pipe wrenches lol. Combining heat or cold or both together with these techniques is a plus.
I've tried some solvents and for the most part they just make a mess and don't do much at all.
Another possible way is using wood in either end and trying to bend each end in opposite directions to help break a seal. What I've done for years to remove the sometimes glued in front cap on a laser pen without damaging it is to use a small piece of leather over the cap with pliers and while holding the pen body with the back half unscrewed you rock the cap while also pulling and rotating the position of where you are gripping the cap so it will break the glue seal and work it's way out. I've never had one I couldn't remove with this method and still leave no mark on the cap.
The reason why you unscrew the back half is the glued or pressed in piece that has the threads on it may come out instead or it could move and lose its position so when you screw it back on the clip will no longer align like it should with the button. You can remove that piece by rocking the 2 sections against each other if you want to make a shorter pen that only uses one battery. Cut the host with that piece out to the right length and then with it screwed back in the other side you just press it back together.
An alternative and easier way to make a short pen is to pop the back end piece out by inserting a dowel or whatever into the back half and smack the dowel end down and the back piece will pop out. Then you just take the clip off and cut the back end down so a single battery will fit right and press the back end piece back in. The only thing tricky is getting the length cut right and not slipping and marking up the pen at the cut plus obviously you want the cut to be perfect so the cap fits like the original.
Thanks Pman, for the heads-up, really like the idea about the water and the belt trick, will be heading to a thrift store and grabbing me a couple. Let you know how things are going.
 

GSS

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Wow Pman, some doozie's of idea's! The frozen expanding water trick is just to good!:beer:
BobMc, I just used a 6 inch C clamp but the 301 host unscrewed in enough pieces to fit.
You just might have to use a flat piece of somekind of stock whether its wood or metal to keep the wobble end of the clamp straight on the dowel pin and find the right extention tube on the host diode end that will let it slide through and out of the host.
 




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