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Need a solvent?

BobMc

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I have a Wicked Laser that I need to opened up. I know their epoxied together, was wondering if anyone would know of a solvent that would eat the epoxy or how I might get into them? Thanks
 

BowtieGuy

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Hi Bob, if you find a solvent that works on the epoxies used on these hosts, please be sure and share. :D

I've tried most everything that I can think of solvent wise, on many types of hosts, and have had no luck at all.
The only thing that I've found that works fairly well, is heat. Some hosts need just a bit, but most require a lot of it.
 

BobMc

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Hi Bob, if you find a solvent that works on the epoxies used on these hosts, please be sure and share. :D

I've tried most everything that I can think of solvent wise, on many types of hosts, and have had no luck at all.
The only thing that I've found that works fairly well, is heat. Some hosts need just a bit, but most require a lot of it.
Thanks! I'll try a little heat, I could have sworn about 6 months ago a read a post from someone who said they new of a solvent that they used and said it worked. Searching for the post, but no luck yet. But if and when I do, I will post of what I've found. .Thanks
 

Lildutchboy7

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Hey bob... Mind throwing me some money? :crackup:

Just kidding! It seems like you're making a million builds/buy and it's making me jealous ;)

Either way I love that you're adding lots of new content. It's nice to see new posts more than once or twice a week like the usual. :)

I just like seeing new builds:D
 

BobMc

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Hey bob... Mind throwing me some money? :crackup:

Just kidding! It seems like you're making a million builds/buy and it's making me jealous ;)

Either way I love that you're adding lots of new content. It's nice to see new posts more than once or twice a week like the usual. :)

I just like seeing new builds:D
Well, I'm gone from the house for 6-7 weeks at a time for work, so when I'm home I get a chance to play/build/post more. My last trip out I ordered parts for two builds and one host .So during my home time I could try my hand at building. Still have one more to go but waiting on parts. But I'm trying to figure out how to get into a Wicked Lasers? Looking for advise/solvent that might do the trick. Any and all suggestions would be helpful???
 
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HydroSean

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My first guess would be to heat it up and slowly melt it with a heat gun. Make sure you're outside and have goggles and gloves. Not safety glasses, GOGGLES WHICH COVER AND SEAL IN YOUR EYES. There is nothing worse than glue vapors depositing on your eyes
 

BobMc

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My first guess would be to heat it up and slowly melt it with a heat gun. Make sure you're outside and have goggles and gloves. Not safety glasses, GOGGLES WHICH COVER AND SEAL IN YOUR EYES. There is nothing worse than glue vapors depositing on your eyes
They got a video on you tube about dismantling an Arctic, shows it in pieces, but not how to get it there. Heat is one idea that I'm hearing from a couple of sources,and thanks for the input about gloves and glasses, will take it to heart, so thanks, and it looks like I've got some work ahead of me!
 
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HydroSean

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They got a video on you tube about dismantling an Arctic, shows it in pieces, but not how to get it there. Heat is one idea that I'm hearing from a couple of sources,and thanks for the input about gloves and glasses, will take it to heart, so thanks, and it looks like I've got some work ahead of me!
Not glasses, GOGGLES. I can't stress enough that you need GOGGLES NOT GLASSES because the vapors can get under glasses.
These are goggles
 
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BobMc

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Not glasses, GOGGLES. I can't stress enough that you need GOGGLES NOT GLASSES because the vapors can get under glasses.
These are goggles
Ok,thanks for the clarification googles not glasses ! got it . thanks. Any idea on how high to take the heat. Without hurting the diode?
 
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paul1598419

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This is true. It would be best to do it under a hood in a lab, but most people don't have access to that. Under a hood, you wouldn't need goggles as the hood is not in contact with the air outside of it. It is ventilated out the top.
 

Benm

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Those goggles will not form an air-tight seal around your eyes either, you'd probably need to use a full face lab (gas) maks for that, or resort to scuba gear.

Neither are required if you work in a well ventilated area, which you should with harmful vapours as stuff that irritates your eyes usually isn't that good for your lungs either.

But back to solvents: You can initially try acetone which is good for some glues and resins. After that dichloromethane and/or chloroform. Be safe is acetone is quite flammable and dichloromethane and chloroform potentially carcinogenic. Don't do this in the kitchen.

If a resin doesnt dissolve in even dcm or chloroform, it's probably not going to dissolve in any solvent.

Trying heat is a reasonable choice too though, some resins are rock hard at room temperature but become sticky goo once you get to 100 celcius or so. Most components will have no problem being that hot for a bit (batteries must be removed).

In case of DPSS lasers you should be careful though, those often have crystal sets held together by glue that could be dislodged by heating. With solvents you must also be careful as even the vapours can destroy acryllic lenses and potentially damage coatings on glass ones. If you can remove them, do so.


... and if you have a fume hood, obviously use that. Otherwise do it outside.
 
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BobMc

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This is true. It would be best to do it under a hood in a lab, but most people don't have access to that. Under a hood, you wouldn't need goggles as the hood is not in contact with the air outside of it. It is ventilated out the top.
Thanks for the advice, don't have a lab so I have to try something else. But it sounds like I need to take great care. Which I shall do.!
 

HydroSean

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Those goggles will not form an air-tight seal around your eyes either, you'd probably need to use a full face lab (gas) maks for that, or resort to scuba gear.

Neither are required if you work in a well ventilated area, which you should with harmful vapours as stuff that irritates your eyes usually isn't that good for your lungs either.

But back to solvents: You can initially try acetone which is good for some glues and resins. After that dichloromethane and/or chloroform. Be safe is acetone is quite flammable and dichloromethane and chloroform potentially carcinogenic. Don't do this in the kitchen.

If a resin doesnt dissolve in even dcm or chloroform, it's probably not going to dissolve in any solvent.

Trying heat is a reasonable choice too though, some resins are rock hard at room temperature but become sticky goo once you get to 100 celcius or so. Most components will have no problem being that hot for a bit (batteries must be removed).

In case of DPSS lasers you should be careful though, those often have crystal sets held together by glue that could be dislodged by heating. With solvents you must also be careful as even the vapours can destroy acryllic lenses and potentially damage coatings on glass ones. If you can remove them, do so.


... and if you have a fume hood, obviously use that. Otherwise do it outside.
Yeah those goggles will seal if you strap them on really tightly but you are right they won't if you have them loosely on. Just get goggles that seal tightly and work outside. I would heat up as slowly as possible since it's an unknown, being careful above 70 Celsius
 

BobMc

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Those goggles will not form an air-tight seal around your eyes either, you'd probably need to use a full face lab (gas) maks for that, or resort to scuba gear.

Neither are required if you work in a well ventilated area, which you should with harmful vapours as stuff that irritates your eyes usually isn't that good for your lungs either.

But back to solvents: You can initially try acetone which is good for some glues and resins. After that dichloromethane and/or chloroform. Be safe is acetone is quite flammable and dichloromethane and chloroform potentially carcinogenic. Don't do this in the kitchen.

If a resin doesnt dissolve in even dcm or chloroform, it's probably not going to dissolve in any solvent.

Trying heat is a reasonable choice too though, some resins are rock hard at room temperature but become sticky goo once you get to 100 celcius or so. Most components will have no problem being that hot for a bit (batteries must be removed).

In case of DPSS lasers you should be careful though, those often have crystal sets held together by glue that could be dislodged by heating. With solvents you must also be careful as even the vapours can destroy acryllic lenses and potentially damage coatings on glass ones. If you can remove them, do so.


... and if you have a fume hood, obviously use that. Otherwise do it outside.
Good advice, need to come up with something that is safe and works, maybe googles, heatgun, outside with a wind blowing the other way??
 

ElectricPlasma

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Might try a dremel/rotary tool, but before that I'd try some alcohol, and see if a scraper or just a knife will give it a bit of luck. If not try some acetone, I have no idea if any of this would actually work but I'm throwing things that I've heard. Maybe even paint thinner would be able to soften/loosen it a bit.

Like BowtieGuy said a lot of heat can do the trick but that can be tricky to work with as well. I'd say if you take this route use a heatgun if you have access to it.
 

paul1598419

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All the two part epoxies I have used won't dissolve in alcohol, acetone or many organic solvents either. I doubt there is a good solvent for most of them. Heat seems like the only real option.
 




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