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Looking for (cheap) Bench Power Supply

paulzimm

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Thanks for the info friend! My 3 Amp just arrived in the mail the other day :)
 

rhd

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Sorry to necropost, though the answer to this question may prove useful to others.

- Is a bench power supply, like those that have been discussed in this thread, safe for powering sensitive laser diodes directly? (safe - assuming no user error)

So far, I've been hesitant to use mine in direct connection with a diode. How clean is the output? Is it safe to run the output directly into a diode?
 

bennett326

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short answer yes

but there is a certain way your supposed to do this give me a sec and ill see if i can find it
 

DTR

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Sorry to necropost, though the answer to this question may prove useful to others.

- Is a bench power supply, like those that have been discussed in this thread, safe for powering sensitive laser diodes directly? (safe - assuming no user error)

So far, I've been hesitant to use mine in direct connection with a diode. How clean is the output? Is it safe to run the output directly into a diode?
I use mine quite often without issues. I am sure you know but I will throw this out there for those wondering.

Following the right process can keep you from making a mistake. Here is a video I posted a while ago. First turn on the power supply. Turn the voltage to just above the forward voltage for the diode based on the current you plan on testing. Then turn the current all the way to zero. Turn the power supply off and short the output leads. Then connect your diode. Turn it on and slowly turn up the current.:beer:

 
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bennett326

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I use mine quite often without issues. I am sure you know but I will throw this out there for those wondering.

Following the right process can keep you from making a mistake. Here is a video I posted a while ago. First turn on the power supply. Turn the voltage to just above the forward voltage for the diode based on the current you plan on testing. Then turn the current all the way to zero. Turn the power supply off and short the output leads. Then connect your diode. Turn it on and slowly turn up the current.:beer:

THANK YOU DTR, i was looking for that exact thing. you just saved me some frustration
 

rhd

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I use mine quite often without issues. I am sure you know but I will throw this out there for those wondering.

Following the right process can keep you from making a mistake. Here is a video I posted a while ago. First turn on the power supply. Turn the voltage to just above the forward voltage for the diode based on the current you plan on testing. Then turn the current all the way to zero. Turn the power supply off and short the output leads. Then connect your diode. Turn it on and slowly turn up the current.:beer:
Perfect, thanks guys :)
 

paulzimm

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I would not use a cheap "switching" power supply since those pulse the full available voltage that the PSU can supply down to the requested voltage of the diode. You instead should use a "linear" power supply that has much cleaner output. From that video above, I have the same linear power supply and I use it all the time to power my laser diodes.
 

rhd

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Mine was cheap. Around $100. 5A / 30V max, looks like those in the thread. Can't remember the make off hand and I'm not I'm front if it.

Are the Mastechs, etc, switching or linear?
 

paulzimm

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That is most likely a linear power supply, if not it would have only cost you about $40 - $50. From my experience, these types of power supplies are usually linear and if they are of the switching type then it will explicitly say so on the packing.

This is where I got mine from: Power Supplies, Bench Supplies
 

Bluefan

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I got my Amrel PPS-2322 for $136 and shipped it for $86 from the US to the Netherlands. It was well worth it even after taxes, a two channel 32V-2A digital power supply with nice features: OVP, OCP, tracking, sense lines and GPIB. And I'm getting a HP 6632A, I think I'm going to love that one, HP makes very good stuff.
 

Blord

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If you are looking for an analog bench psu, look one with 2 dials voor each setting. A fine and coarse knob is very handy for fine-tuning. And they don't cost much more than the version with one knob.
 




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