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Laser pest control?

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photonaholic

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A bearded dragon, AKA beardie
 

Dvorhagen

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Just based on the color of that one, I bet any but the most powerful red lasers would reflect harmlessly off its scales anyway!
 
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My sister has a leopard gecko, my cats love to watch it in the cage but when it comes out they are scared as hell of it :D
This guy is such a tard, though. ¬¬
 
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@KnockThis you need to rethink how you use your laser, do you know if there were no frogs, gekos or bats we would be knee deep in insects right now, maby you need some guidence with your lasers I don't know but I hope you find the right way, some times we just do the wrong things right off.
and since I don't have a gecko picture for you I'll just send you an approprate one.

Try not to do this again, OK....
 

Arayan

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Look it up on Wiki, it mentions the Van der Waals as probable cause of Geckos abilities.
I don't know what to tell ya, I am not much experienced nor knowledgeable of the subject. Sorry.
yes, the Van der Waals interaction are involved in gecko's ability :) I found an abstract from a scientific journal (Mechanics of Materials)

Abstract said:
Geckos (Gekko gecko) have evolved elaborate adhesive structures which allow them to move along vertical walls and ceilings against their body weight. There is strong evidence that the adhesion ability of geckos is due to the van der Waals interaction between a contacting surface and hundreds of thousands of keratinous hairs or setae on the gecko’s foot; each seta is 30–130 μm long and contains hundreds of 200–500 nm projections or spatulae. While contact mechanics suggests that the refinement of structure size results in greater adhesive strength, some important questions remain unsolved: What is the significance of nanometer length scale for adhesion? What is the optimum adhesive strength of a structure? How can a structure optimized for attachment simultaneously allow easy detachment, as reversible adhesion is crucial for the animal’s movement? In this paper, we show that the nanometer range of the spatula size of geckos may have evolved to optimize the adhesive strength and maximum tolerance of imperfect adhesion (for robustness). Our analysis also indicates that the asymmetrical structure of the gecko’s seta structure may have been designed to simultaneously allow robust attachment and easy detachment.
 

Eudaimonium

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Lonewolf, that is one cute little guy :D

Photonaholic, reminds me of good old saying:
Nobody is useless, even worst ones can be used... as an example :D

Photo, you would not happen to have a Gecko, would you?
Take a pic in case you do?
Thanks!
 

bob808

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As far as I know regarding the stickiness of the geckos they have on each thumb billions and billions of micro-fibers. They are so thin that they can get into the material's irregularities. I posted 2 pictures of microscopic design of both the fibers of the gecko as well as the surface of a random material. Any surface like glass thou it looks smooth at macro level, on micro level it's very rough.
 

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