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Killed my C6, ugh :(

Eudaimonium

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I would take the remaining "unused" pin, bend it over so the tip is touching or almost touching the "positive pin." Then add flux and a dab of solder to fill in the gap. If it works, you now have an electrically and mechanically sound pin to solder the driver lead to. This extra pin will be either for nothing, or for a photodiode, so who cares if that gets blown up.
Wow, I haven't thought of that!

That just might work!
 

ped

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I would take the remaining "unused" pin, bend it over so the tip is touching or almost touching the "positive pin." Then add flux and a dab of solder to fill in the gap. If it works, you now have an electrically and mechanically sound pin to solder the driver lead to. This extra pin will be either for nothing, or for a photodiode, so who cares if that gets blown up.
Wow, what a great idea, that way the unused pin is held perfectly in place, instead of shaky hands.

+4 when the system allows.

Just to add to that, the solder "bridge" won't be as strong as the original pin so take it extra easy on the repaired pin if it works.
 

Marco Polo

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I did what was suggested, i.e. bridging the damaged pin to the case and rewiring the driver input such that it was case-positive rather than case negative. Also made sure I inserted the battery accordingly.

Unfortunately, either the diode is dead, the driver is dead, or one of the connections isn't solid. No light from it at all.

The connections do look and feel solid, both diode leads are attached to their proper terminals, and the inputs are likewise connected correctly and solidly.

I think DTR had it right when he said I may have blown the driver by testing its outputs on a DMM to verify voltage, when I probably should have used a test load across the outputs instead. I figured the resistance of the DMM would prevent excessive current flow but it may have just caused the driver to boost itself to death.

Lessons learned, if nothing else, and I really appreciate you guys advising and trying to help :)

In terms of keeping things steady and avoiding shaky hands, turns out the chemistry stand and clamps are good for more than just holding lasers during a photo shoot.
 

rhd

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Why not grab a 350ma driver based on the AMC7135 and at least give it a shot? Those are common positive drivers, and cost about a dollar, shipped free from China.

It might at least be worth a shot before you trash the diode. Granted, it's not a pricey diode, but at the same time, a $2 driver isn't a pricey last ditch effort to make it work either.
 

Marco Polo

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Too impatient, don't feel like waiting a month for something that may or may not work. I mailed it off to DTR and we'll see what can be done with it, if anything. At least I got some information out of it, so it's not a total loss. Will be plenty of future projects, and in the meantime I need to get some proper diagnostic, soldering, and other tools.
 
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KRNAZNBOY

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I have problems with my hands shaking when I solder as well. Maybe more manageable than it is for others, but it still pisses me off.

Any way to help this?

Thanks
-Matt
 

Eudaimonium

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I have problems with my hands shaking when I solder as well. Maybe more manageable than it is for others, but it still pisses me off.

Any way to help this?

Thanks
-Matt

Correct hand, arm and wrist positioning so it's always up against something.

Have whatever you're soldering held 4 fingers high, so that you can naturally rest your palm on the top of your desk and hold the soldering iron just like a pencil with a very long tip. When it's held horizontally, it's pretty darn accurate.

Also, take advantage that whatever you need to solder, you need to "rest" the tip on it, at least for a few seconds. Your hand may be shaking when tip is mid-air, but resting the tip on the soldering spot is actually pretty easy to manage.

Also, shot of hard liquor or two for steady hands.
Kidding.
Not.
 
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Marco Polo

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When I tried the suggested fix to the Opnext diode I leaned some weight onto my arm and braced my hand against the vertical rod on my chemistry stand. That did help. Clamping the module and driver took a lot of the work out of it. With proper tools and some practice I think I can overcome the shaky hands issue.
 

IsaacT

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I have problems with my hands shaking when I solder as well. Maybe more manageable than it is for others, but it still pisses me off.

Any way to help this?

Thanks
-Matt
Whiskey :) I have the same problem with my hands haha.
 

Sigurthr

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You have to understand how constant current drivers work; it monitors the current being drawn from the output and if the draw is less than the driver is set to it increases the voltage at the output to try to compensate. If you connect a high resistance to the output the driver can fail since it cannot generate a high enough voltage to force the set current through the load. Linear drivers usually won't fail but switch mode ones certainly can.

I'd test the diode with a high value series resistor and a power supply with voltage exceeding the nominal Vf (assuming you don't have another driver or variable bench supply). The resistance should be enough to allow threshold current but no more.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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There is something called a third hand tool which has a magnifying glass and 2 clips to hold things in
almost any position. The only thing to watch out for with one of those is they will dig into insulation if it is
too close to where you're soldering.

Multimeters have a resistance in the Megaohms range (usually 10MEG).
 

bdgreenb

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Correct hand, arm and wrist positioning so it's always up against something.

Have whatever you're soldering held 4 fingers high, so that you can naturally rest your palm on the top of your desk and hold the soldering iron just like a pencil with a very long tip. When it's held horizontally, it's pretty darn accurate.

Also, take advantage that whatever you need to solder, you need to "rest" the tip on it, at least for a few seconds. Your hand may be shaking when tip is mid-air, but resting the tip on the soldering spot is actually pretty easy to manage.

Also, shot of hard liquor or two for steady hands.
Kidding.
Not.
Wish i read this before a year of soldering... pretty much my exact remedy for my shakiness. On day one, thought i was just a person who would never be able to solder. +1 :D
 

Marco Polo

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Oh, I understand how a constant current driver works NOW ;)

I added this experience to the "mistakes that can happen to anybody" thread.

Good advice on soldering too, especially the whiskey... Laphroaig, anyone?
 

Eudaimonium

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Good advice on soldering too, especially the whiskey... Laphroaig, anyone?
Ballantine's finest, if whiskey at all, which is rare.

You don't wanna know what toxins, affectionately called liquors, we consume in this part of the world.
 

Zeebit

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My hand doesn't really shake when soldering and I'm happy with it.

Also, I only use a lens spring so that I don't have to constantly replace the teflon and there is no risk of it getting into the diode window.
 

bdgreenb

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before soldering i like to take a bracing shot of chang'aa (Kenyan "kill me quickly")
 




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