Welcome to Laser Pointer Forums - discuss green laser pointers, blue laser pointers, and all types of lasers



EP's Host Build Guide

ElectricPlasma

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 11, 2015
Messages
1,629
Points
113
It's about time I put this thread together, here's how to assemble my hosts. I'd say it's easy to grasp, and the process is identical for every host I make.

Materials

All are included unless otherwise stated:



Heatsink: The one shown in the image is threaded, however some are not and will require the thermal adhesive (or any adhesive of your choice) to bond to the host body

Thermal adhesive: While it's best to use a thermal adhesive so the host body can be part of the heatsink, the most important factor is mechanical stability. The last thing you want is that heatsink coming loose, so chose your adhesive (I'd recommend epoxy) wisely. Keep in mind that the bonding surfaces will already be roughened and sometimes include machining marks, which is good for the adhesive to latch onto. And saves me from having to treat the surface :whistle:

Host body: The handle/battery bay of the host

Contact plug: 3D printed with plastic, and therefore insulates the two power lines (positive and negative) from each other. Uses a bolt and a nut, very simple, no soldering required.

Case negative module: Any laser module of your choice with an integrated driver, as long as the amount of batteries meet the input requirement on the driver. The module needs to be case negative, or at least have some sort of case connection. This is very easy to do by just having the negative input of the driver soldered to the case pin on the diode with a very short wire, all internally. I haven't even done this myself, because if you ask DTR nicely he'll do it for you ;) It can be done without a case signal, but the way of doing that with my build method is pretty unconventional.

Tools




Vise: I make the heatsinks with an interference fit (AKA press-fit) for DTR's modules, which can be pressed in with a vice using moderate strength. An interference fit is best for thermal transfer, no thermal grease necessary. The type of vise I'm using here is a 4" drill press vise.

Trigger clamp (or any clamp really): Used for holding the contact plug in while the adhesive is drying. A good idea might be to use a larger clamp when gluing the heatsink to the body if it's not threaded.


Tutorial


It's easy! :D

This is optional, but I like to line the bottom of the vise with duct tape to prevent any scratches:


Start off by pressing the module into the heatsink:



Once that's done, strip the wire and make a "hook" shape as shown:


Hook the wire onto the bolt and tighten down the nut:



Put on a thin coat of adhesive on the contact plug, and clamp it in place to dry. Set time will depend on the adhesive you use


Your heatsink should look a little something like this:


Remember, if the heatsink isn't threaded, make sure to be aware of the importance for this part - Mix the adhesive for a good minute or two (if using a type of epoxy), spread evenly (light coat) and clamp together. Wipe off any excess while you can, because you won't be able to get it off once it's cured.




Ready for batteries! :cool:

-E.P.
 
  • Like
Reactions: GSS



RB astro

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 6, 2014
Messages
2,505
Points
113
Excellent thread EP !
Thank you for putting this together {pardon the pun}. :D

+rep when I can.

RB

:beer:
 

paul1598419

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2013
Messages
15,870
Points
113
Oh, so you've gone to pressed hosts just like some of sinner's hosts. Yeah, that's how it's done, alright. Nice tutorial, EP.
 

BobMc

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 23, 2016
Messages
3,813
Points
113
Nice tutorial EP, makes it plan and very simple. You might want to mention/show the pinch method with the ground wire on the contact board for those people that don't have, didn't buy a module that is case grounded. Like me. :)
It's all pretty simple/basic though. Just thought I mentain it. It all makes your builds/hosts very easy and quick to work with. Nice :)
 
Last edited:

ElectricPlasma

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 11, 2015
Messages
1,629
Points
113
Thanks guys, glad you like the thread. Nice one Andrew, I even made that pun myself on the first sentence of this thread, and didn't even notice it! :p

Yea Paul, beats having to deal with thermal grease by a ton. :yh:

Nice tutorial EP, makes it plan and very simple. You might want to mention/show the pinch method with the ground wire on the contact board for those people that don't have, didn't buy a module that is case grounded. Like me. :)
It's all pretty simple/basic though. Just thought I mentain it. It all makes your builds/hosts very easy and quick to work with. Nice :)
You're right Bob, I forgot about that. I've since moved away from that method, and instead encouraged to solder to the case pin on the diode. But I guess in the end they're both equally as good. If you have some pics of any of your builds using the "pinch method", please, feel free to post them. :D Otherwise I'll try to see if I can get some photos myself.
 

BobMc

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 23, 2016
Messages
3,813
Points
113
You're right Bob, I forgot about that. I've since moved away from that method, and instead encouraged to solder to the case pin on the diode. But I guess in the end they're both equally as good. If you have some pics of any of your builds using the "pinch method", please, feel free to post them. :D Otherwise I'll try to see if I can get some photos myself.
No sorry photobucket has my photo's and they're holding them for ransom. :crackup:

It pretty simple though, you just strip back the wire enough to twist around the part of the contact board that gets pushed into to heatsink. If you do it just right it make a tight fit so you don't have to use epoxy to hold the contact board in. (The wire takes up the slack and make a tight fit.) Also it's easier to undo if you ever want to change out the module. Done it on a few of your hosts, works quite well. :)

Ps, just don't let the two (bare part) of wires touch and you good to go. :)
 
Last edited:

Alaskan

Well-known member
LPF Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 29, 2014
Messages
11,649
Points
113
Nice, I miss posts like this, glad a few members are taking the time to do this.
 

Richie89

Well-known member
Joined
May 9, 2015
Messages
1,087
Points
83
Wow! For some reason I had no earthly idea how exactly to make modules Case negative because most of DTR lasers are neutral so I didn't need to worry about this, but now that I would need to do this if I purchased one of these hosts I just realized how to do by reading your post, you just solder basically the black wire that you would normally solder to the brass ring of the pill to the little case pin instead right?
 

paul1598419

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2013
Messages
15,870
Points
113
Actually, if the diode has a case pin and you want to make your diode case negative, you solder the case pin to the cathode pin and you're done. It's that simple. :)
However if you need a current path for the driver the negative lead needs to be connected to the case somehow. One way of doing this if the module makes a good connection to the case is to solder it to the case pin.
 
Last edited:

Richie89

Well-known member
Joined
May 9, 2015
Messages
1,087
Points
83
Actually, if the diode has a case pin and you want to make your diode case negative, you solder the case pin to the cathode pin and you're done. It's that simple. :)
However if you need a current path for the driver the negative lead needs to be connected to the case somehow. One way of doing this if the module makes a good connection to the case is to solder it to the case pin.
Ohhh, Okay that's good you clarified that for me because I would have totally screwed that up, lol
Thanks Paul :)
 




Top