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Effect of Laser Light on Cameras?

Livinloud

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IMO you need to know how to use a 35mm in order to be a good photographer. The whole concept of ISO, shutter speed, exposure, focus, etc is the essence of 35mm. Now its all done for you (I say now and I'm only 22 :crackup:) I need to invest in a good DSLR but I've put most of my money in lasers, flashlights, my dirtbike, GF and now a projector. Not that waiting is a bad thing since technology only gets better :)

Plus now you can get an adapter and use most 35mm lens on a DSLR body. Modern technology meets old school lens :beer:
 

IsaacT

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What lenses would yall suggest to immediately invest in? I have an 18-55mm lens that came with my camera but I have been looking at prime lenses and telephotos wanting everything that comes into my sight.
 
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I've had no bad results at this point; at most the brightness 'bleaches' the colors a bit, this is evident with 638nm. I definitely would avoid direct beam exposure as it will burn the sensor.

 

trencheel303

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IMO you need to know how to use a 35mm in order to be a good photographer. The whole concept of ISO, shutter speed, exposure, focus, etc is the essence of 35mm.
All of those things still need set on a digital SLR so I don't know where you get the idea that it's all done for you. Yes, there are program modes like sports mode but any remotely modern (90s onwards) 35mm SLR had this as well, along with aperture priority (which is nigh on essential under certain circumstances), shutter priority and bracketing. In fact, ISO hardly even came into play on 35mm as you set the film in camera and left it. On digital you can change it on the fly and often have to in low light. Reciprocity failure also doesn't exist on digital so the exposure curve is "more" linear than it is on film, it also reacts to colours (particular multiple contrasting colours in one scene) very different to film.

As for using 35mm lenses on a DSLR body, you shouldn't need an adapter for most of the recent, decent lenses, as both the Nikon F mount and Canon EF mount are still in use and haven't changed since 35mm. If you were to get a really old (such as Canon FD) lens then adapters are not always a good idea or even possible, due to differences in distance between the lens flange (in Canon's case) and of course lack of auto focus - which on an AF body makes focussing nigh on impossible as there is no split prism focus screen. 35mm lenses designed for film also lack the coatings and optical technology that helps combat flare caused by light bouncing off the sensor and back onto the lens elements.
 
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IsaacT

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Yeah, I don't ever shoot in Auto mode unless I pick up my camera after my sister has played around with it and forget to check. I shoot in manual and only shoot in RAW format and then process the pictures myself.
 




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