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Blindness?^^

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If by killer beam you mean something like this :






Yea kind of fascinates me, by the way, the colour of that laser is BEAUTIFULL in my opinion :] reminds me of Caribbean beaches





 

Blade

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thats a 473nm for you. theyre awesome! but can cost thousands of dollars!

btw THESE are killer beams!... (one is a pic of a disfunctional laser i had, and one was someones avatar from this forum :crackup:)
 

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robi500

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How does a blind spot caused by laser damage looks like ,is it like black dot in the field of vision or brain "erases" it like it does with the normal l blind spot that everyone have in the center of the eye where optic nerve is is attached to the retina ?

like this?


Interesting test for the normal blind spot:
 
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Guyfromhe

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I believe the brain will compensate for small spots... If a huge area is damaged you will probably see some black areas.

The missing part will be distorted though.
 

InfinitusEquitas

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I believe the brain will compensate for small spots... If a huge area is damaged you will probably see some black areas.

The missing part will be distorted though.
The areas won't be black, so much as foggy and hazy.

Also obviously the fact that we have two eyes helps a great deal... I'm sure the same adaptation that allows us to ignore the natural blind spot works to a degree with blind spots from injuries.
 

robi500

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Is it true that shortsighted people if they don't wear glasses have less chance of the damage?

I was once hit in the eye by the beam reflected of the window (old one layer glass) and didn't notice any deterioration of the eye sight.

When doctors perform laser eye surgery to remove shortsightedness or farsightedness how do they avoid damage to the retina?
 
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InfinitusEquitas

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Is it true that shortsighted people if they don't wear glasses have less chance of the damage?

I was once hit in the eye by the beam reflected of the window (old one layer glass) and didn't notice any deterioration of the eye sight.
Glasses aid those of us who are shortsighted in properly focusing the light that enters the eye, onto the retina.

Without glasses the light would not be as focused... depending on total power density of the beam when it hits the retina, it could also make things worse though, by spreading out the damage.

Prescription glasses also offer a degree of protection... but that's kind of like wearing a leather jacket to stop a bullet.... will it help slow down the bullet? Yes.

Will it matter? No.
 

sopark4000

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The Boeing Airborne Laser will most definitely blow your head off. Focusable to a range that is "classified for now, but hundreds of miles" it's purpose is to blow ICBMs out of the sky before they reach the US, however in an interview with a rep the lethality of it's use in other scenarios was discussed. http://www.boeing.com/defense-space/military/abl/ABLTB_overview.pdf
Actually the boeing airborne laser or ABLTB is only meant to heat the fragile outer skin of an ICBM and cause a small structural failure in the skin. Once the skin fails in a small area the rest is soon to go due to the high wind stresses placed on an ICBM while still in the boost stage. If you aimed the boeing laser at a tank for example it wouldn't do much other than to heat small area of the tank. Obviously if it was aimed at a person that person would be pretty screwed but for the most part the ABLTB relies on the the outer skin of a boosting ICBM to be very fragile.
 

sopark4000

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That graph is very useful. Here is the enlarged version



It's weird, like I said according to this graph 1W of 445 has no flash blindness potential which seems hard to believe.
 
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Ash

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I was trying to figure this out. I thought it had something to do with the means of calculating the distances; " For flashblindness, the FAA’s Sensitive Zone Exposure Distance is used. The maximum permissible exposure in this area is 0.1 milliwatts (100 microwatts) per square centimeter."
Really, I think it has to do with our sensitivity (or lack) to blue light.
Green will flashblind at relatively low powers because it's at the peak of our sensitivity. I believe that a blue would be powerful enough to do damage before it causes flash blindness. Does this make sense?
Hmm,... :thinking:
 

DrSid

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I guess it's because blue is not very important color, and it would only 'deplete' blue cones, leaving rods more or less unaffected. You might not see blue color really well, after being dazzled by blue, but you would see black and white pretty well. Somehow I'm not about to test it though ..

Edit to ash: I think so too ..
 
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