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Best laser for long distance pointing

mikzip

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Hi I am all new to lasers. I would like to buy a laser
where the beam can be seen on long distances (kilometers)
I am not interested in burning stuff.

I am a little confused with all the options??

Which one would you recommend of these two from O Like?

400mW green laser torch /focusable/waterproof (Wavelength:532nm Output Power: 350mW) 205$
Real 1W 445nm blue Laser torch/waterproof/focusable (Wavelength:445nm output power :900mW) 210$
Or maybe something else in the same price range.

I know that the greenie is sold out for the moment

Some more questions, do i need goggles just to point up in up in the sky, as i understand it, it is only a direct beam-shot in the eye that are dangerous, reflected or not?

I live in Greenland, so i am also concerned about the usability in a cold climate, can I damage the laser to use it in sub minus temperatures? :undecided:
 
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Laserburns

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Probably a green around 200mw (real) or little more with IR Filter, is the best choice for beam visibility.

I bet this one would show a green line that will last in 30 kilometers!

http://www.o-like.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=2&products_id=41

is almost $300... too much?

I live in Greenland, so i am also concerned about the usability in a cold climate, can I damage the laser to use it in sub minus temperatures? :undecided:
I would worry more for battery performance, than for laser diode.
 
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Personally I think my cheap 200mw red dilda is the best for distance. Since the beam is not very bright it is easier to see the dot on very distant objects.
 

DJNY

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Personally I think my cheap 200mw red dilda is the best for distance. Since the beam is not very bright it is easier to see the dot on very distant objects.
Hi I am all new to lasers. I would like to buy a laser
where the beam can be seen on long distances (kilometers)
I am not interested in burning stuff.

... ;)
 

mikzip

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Hi thanks for the suggestions :)

I have decided for a green, so the question now is which is better for god long distance pointing, good quality - low power or lesser quality - higher power?? (At about the same price)

My budget will be max $400

do I need goggles for just for looking at the beam, I will only use it outdoor, mostly from my balcony, to point out in the sky and across a fjord with some rocks on the other side, about 5 km away :confused:
 

Laserburns

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Hi thanks for the suggestions :)

I have decided for a green, so the question now is which is better for god long distance pointing, good quality - low power or lesser quality - higher power?? (At about the same price)

My budget will be max $400

do I need goggles for just for looking at the beam, I will only use it outdoor, mostly from my balcony, to point out in the sky and across a fjord with some rocks on the other side, about 5 km away :confused:
That one i suggested is definitely the best choice in that price range, also IR filter makes the laser less dangerous and the green beam more visible, anyway, in that price, even with IR filter, that laser is still able to burn stuff.

Generally outdoor, if you point to sky or long distance building, goggles are not needed.. they are instead, recommended for any indoor use, at that MW emission.

The green on 400mw for $200 is a class behind that one with IR filter, just wanted you to know, that "more mw" does not mean, always more power or more quality.. i have the 400, but if could afford it, i would take defintively the 350 IR filtered... also has a better duty cycle, so it can be turned on, more than 60 seconds. You have to know that...
 
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anselm

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If you're willing to spend 400$ you are already well into the quality products!
Overall good quality and carefully aligned optics are certainly much more desirable than simply
(mostly exaggerated anyway) high power claims.

You don't need goggles for pointing outside, you mostly need them indoors or for close up burning.
In fact, with the goggles on, you wouldn't even see the beam at all, so.....
 

mikzip

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For the laser, if the color isn´t important for you, you should go with a green DPSS laser. Better beam characteristics, but on the other hand more temperature sensitive.

The O-Like laser is a good one. You may also consider the one I have.
http://laserpointerforums.com/f48/don-t-shoot-me-58124.html#post822019
I don't think the lasers from O-like are DPSS except this one:

80mW 473nm blue laser diode module w/ Double TEC [OL473BL-80] - $478.00 : Welcome to O-Like.com, Your source for laser products

Aint exactly handheld :D
 

3zuli

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@OP: you need a high power (200mW+) green laser with some beam expander. these are pretty expensive (usually $100 and more) but you can use some cheap binocular instead. you must only manage to hold your laser in perfect line with the beam expander to get the best effect
 

RA_pierce

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If you wish to use your laser in below freezing temperatures, diode may be a better option vs. DPSS.

Most red lasers are diode lasers and have great divergence for long distance pointing. Their disadvantage, however, is that they are not nearly as bright as green when comparing power to power.
If you need to see the "spot" over large distances, red would be great since it is attenuated less in the atmosphere allowing the user to see where the laser is pointed without a bright beam obscuring the point of termination.

I would not recommend a "cheap" green laser even if it's output power is high.
They have high failure rates and can be unstable. Low temperatures may make this worse.
30-70mW will be plenty, 100-150mW will be very bright. Anything more is excessive for pointing and can be very hazardous.

If your budget is $400, check out this:
Laserglow Technologies - Handheld Lasers, Alignment Lasers and Lab / OEM Lasers
Laserglow is known for high quality products. The Aries 75-125 should be well suited to your application.

If something cheaper is needed, I would recommend looking into some 200-250mW red lasers. They are inexpensive and usually have fewer problems than DPSS green. Namely, they are much more stable and reliable in low temperatures.
 
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anselm

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OP, listen to RA-pierce, especially that bit about DPSS and freezing temps.
You WILL have much more issues than with a pure diode laser.
 

mikzip

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I gather that some are just lucky to receive a good sheap one, with fine alignment, small beam diameter and divergence, and power up to speck or more, and some are unlucky, you really have to pay a lot if you want guaranteed success.
I am still a little undecided but appreciate all the suggestions :thanks:
 




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