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Switch

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I'm sure there are more estetic ways of mounting the filter to any laser than simply gluing it on the aperture :p Also try to stick it perpendicular to the beam.This will probably minimize green reflections.
 

Razako

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Switch said:
I'm sure there are more estetic ways of mounting the filter to any laser than simply gluing it on the aperture :p Also try to stick it perpendicular to the beam.This will probably minimize green reflections.
Have you tried cutting these filters? Cutting them to some precision shape isn't going to happen.
 

VW

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AFAIK, IR emits much less diverged than the actual laser beam. As long as you're standing behind, or to the side of the laser, you're not getting exposed. Look at it this way, with low powered lasers you'll probably get 1mW of IR to every 5mW of colour. So you'll only really be exposed to say around 5mW of IR with a 20mW laser. Higher powers on the other hand give out a significantly large ammount of IR, almost equal or greater than that of colour, this is where you really need to start to worry and where an IR filter is necessary. As long as you're aware that looking along the beam towards the laser is exposing you to IR, even while the beam isn't touching your eye, you should be okay.
 
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VW said:
AFAIK, IR emits much less diverged than the actual laser beam. As long as you're standing behind, or to the side of the laser, you're not getting exposed. Look at it this way, with low powered lasers you'll probably get 1mW of IR to every 5mW of colour. So you'll only really be exposed to say around 5mW of IR with a 20mW laser. Higher powers on the other hand give out a significantly large ammount of IR, almost equal or greater than that of colour, this is where you really need to start to worry and where an IR filter is necessary. As long as you're aware that looking along the beam towards the laser is exposing you to IR, even while the beam isn't touching your eye, you should be okay.
I couldn't of said it better myself

and i guess im going to re-use my diagram again. lol
 

Switch

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daguin said:
[quote author=Switch link=1211999457/12#16 date=1212015019] estetic
**aesthetic**

Just trying to help keep you from looking like a dweeb.

Peace,
dave
[/quote]

Uh :(....I knew that, it's just that it's 2am here and that how it's writen in my native language, so as I'm not really using "aesthetic" a lot in english, I wasn't paying attention. :p

And about the diagram: I just macrofocused my webcam to see the dot up close and to look down the beam.It's not getting any IR exposure unless I point it at the camera lens.The dot is about 2mm a few inches away from the aperture, seriously I would give it a max of 3mRad.You'd have to put the beam damn close to your eye to get exposed to IR.It's pretty safe to look down the beam.Someone posted a pic of a very well collimated IR leakage beam in the other IR thread.
Can more people with IR filterless greenies check the divergence of the IR?I'm starting to believe that leaking IR is collimated and that stuff like in the diagrams never happens. :-/
 

styropyro

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bobobob121 said:
[quote author=VW link=1211999457/12#20 date=1212015756]AFAIK, IR emits much less diverged than the actual laser beam. As long as you're standing behind, or to the side of the laser, you're not getting exposed. Look at it this way, with low powered lasers you'll probably get 1mW of IR to every 5mW of colour. So you'll only really be exposed to say around 5mW of IR with a 20mW laser. Higher powers on the other hand give out a significantly large ammount of IR, almost equal or greater than that of colour, this is where you really need to start to worry and where an IR filter is necessary. As long as you're aware that looking along the beam towards the laser is exposing you to IR, even while the beam isn't touching your eye, you should be okay.
I couldn't of said it better myself

and i guess im going to re-use my diagram again. lol
[/quote]
I'm not sure if that diagram is correct for all unfiltered lasers. I have a an unfiltered greenie thats IR stays collimated with the green beam over distances. I can't get my IR camera to work right now but I'll upload a picture of the IR dot later if you want.
 
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Actually, i don't find that a bad thing if IR is leaking out really close with the laser beam. That makes it less chance of hitting someone with IR accidentally; and more burning power ;)
 

styropyro

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Switch- a rough measurement of the IR of my unfiltered greenie gave me a divergence of around 1.5mRad, the green is around .5mRad so you know.
 

L4sers

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So... let me get this straight.

For example:

I have a 50mW laser. I pull it out of my pocket, turn it on, and shoot it at a building 20 feet away from me. I am looking at the dot on the building, and I see the beam. I notice I do not have an IR filter on, and my laser is leaking IR. My friend is standing to the right of my beam. Is he/she in danger?
 

Razako

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L4sers said:
So... let me get this straight.

For example:

I have a 50mW laser. I pull it out of my pocket, turn it on, and shoot it at a building 20 feet away from me. I am looking at the dot on the building, and I see the beam. I notice I do not have an IR filter on, and my laser is leaking IR. My friend is standing to the right of my beam. Is he/she in danger?
Your friend should be fine as long as they are 10+ feet away from the beam. Any IR that hits them will be too spread out to cause damage. What you shouldn't do is look down the beam from in front of the laser because it will spray your face with IR if you do that.
 

Razako

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bobobob121 said:
would putting any camera close to the beam be a bad idea as well?
Your camera should be fine as long as you don't aim the laser directly into it.
 




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