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Shooting in Las Vegas

RedCowboy

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There are well over a quarter of a billion guns in America owned by private citizens.

It is said that 3% of Americans own 1/2 the guns but also over 1/3 of all Citizens own guns, some polls say it's really more like half of all Americans own guns.

In order to change a Constitutional amendment it takes 2/3 of both the house and senate and then must be ratified by 3/4 of all 50 States.

Here's some education for you:

Amending the Constitution is a necessarily and intentionally difficult thing to do. It's been attempted hundreds of times to address controversial issues from gay marriage to abortion rights to balancing the federal budget. And Congress has been successful only 27 times since the Constitution was signed in September 1787.

The first ten amendments are called the Bill of Rights because their aim is to protect certain freedoms granted to American citizens and to limit the power of the federal government.

The remaining 17 amendments address a variety of topics including voting rights, slavery and the sale of alcohol.

The first 10 amendments were ratified in December 1791. The most recent amendment, which prohibits Congress from giving itself a pay raise, was ratified in May 1992.

So how is the Constitution amended?

Article 5 of the Constitution outlines the process for amending the document. There are two steps: proposal and ratification.

Step 1: Proposing An Amendment

Either Congress or the states can propose an amendment to the Constitution.
Both houses of Congress must propose the amendment with a two-thirds vote. This is how all current amendments have been offered.
Two-thirds of the state legislatures must call on Congress to hold a constitutional convention.

Step 2. Ratifying An Amendment

Regardless of how the amendment is proposed, it must be ratified by the States.
Three-fourths of the state legislatures must approve of the amendment proposed by Congress, or


Three-fourths of the states must approve the amendment via ratifying conventions. This method has only been used once, to repeal Prohibition with the 21st Amendment.

Is there a timeline for ratification? The U.S. Supreme Court has held that ratification must happen within "some reasonable time after the proposal." Since the 18th Amendment was ratified, Congress has set a term of seven years for ratification.
Only 33 amendments have received a two-thirds vote from both Houses of Congress. Of those, only 27 have been ratified by the States. Perhaps the most visible failure is the Equal Rights Amendment.

Article 5 of the Constitution reads:


"The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Application of the Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a Convention for proposing Amendments, which, in either Case, shall be valid to all Intents and Purposes, as Part of this Constitution, when ratified by the Legislatures of three fourths of the several States, or by Conventions in three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may be proposed by the Congress; Provided that no Amendment which may be made prior to the Year One thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any Manner affect the first and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section of the first Article; and that no State, without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal Suffrage in the Senate."

About the 27 Amendments

Here are summaries of all the constitutional amendments:
The 1st Amendment guarantees Americans freedom of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom to assemble and freedom to petition the government.
The 2nd amendment guarantees Americans the individual right to keep and bear arms. (Note) The Supreme court upheld the 2nd Amendment is an individual right enjoyed by private Citizens.
The 3rd Amendment prohibits the government from forcing citizens to house U.S. soldiers in peace time.
The 4th Amendment protects citizens against unwarranted police searches and seizures.
The 5th amendment grants certain rights to Americans who are accused of crimes.
The 6th Amendment establishes the rights of citizens who face trials and juries.
The 7th amendment guarantees the right to a trial by jury in federal civil court cases.
The 8th Amendment protects Americans against "cruel and unusual" criminal punishment.
The 9th Amendment states rights not specifically delineated in the Constitution should still be respected.
The 10th Amendment grants powers to the states and people when those powers are not allocated to the federal government.
The 11th amendment sets jurisdiction of the Supreme Court.
The 12th amendment defines how the Electoral College chooses the President and Vice President
The 13th Amendment abolishes slavery.
The 14th amendment grants citizenship to African Americans and those born in the United States. It grants citizens equal protection under the law at both the state and federal levels.
The 15th Amendment bans the use of race as a qualification to vote.
The 16th Amendment allows the government to collect income taxes.
The 17th Amendment states U.S. senators are to be elected and not appointed by state legislatures.
The 18th Amendment, which has been repealed, prohibited the sale and manufacture of alcoholic beverages in what became known as Prohibition.
The 19th Amendment prohibited the use of gender as a qualification to vote.
The 20th amendment states when Congress is in session.
The 21st amendment repealed Prohibition.
The 22nd Amendment limits presidents to two four-year terms.
The 23rd amendment gives Washington, D.C., electors in the Electoral College.
The 24th Amendment bans "poll taxes."
The 25th Amendment delineates the line of succession for president.
The 26th Amendment allows 18-year-old citizens the right to vote.
The 27th Amendment states members of Congress cannot raise their own salaries.

In short changing the 2nd Amendment is not going to happen.
 
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Joined
Feb 1, 2017
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There are well over a quarter of a billion guns in America owned by private citizens.

In order to change a Constitutional amendment it takes 2/3 of both the house and senate and then must be ratified by 3/4 of all 50 States.

Here's some education for you:

Amending the Constitution is a necessarily and intentionally difficult thing to do. It's been attempted hundreds of times to address controversial issues from gay marriage to abortion rights to balancing the federal budget. And Congress has been successful only 27 times since the Constitution was signed in September 1787.

The first ten amendments are called the Bill of Rights because their aim is to protect certain freedoms granted to American citizens and to limit the power of the federal government.

The remaining 17 amendments address a variety of topics including voting rights, slavery and the sale of alcohol.

The first 10 amendments were ratified in December 1791. The most recent amendment, which prohibits Congress from giving itself a pay raise, was ratified in May 1992.

So how is the Constitution amended?

Article 5 of the Constitution outlines the process for amending the document. There are two steps: proposal and ratification.

Step 1: Proposing An Amendment

Either Congress or the states can propose an amendment to the Constitution.
Both houses of Congress must propose the amendment with a two-thirds vote. This is how all current amendments have been offered.
Two-thirds of the state legislatures must call on Congress to hold a constitutional convention.

Step 2. Ratifying An Amendment

Regardless of how the amendment is proposed, it must be ratified by the States.
Three-fourths of the state legislatures must approve of the amendment proposed by Congress, or


Three-fourths of the states must approve the amendment via ratifying conventions. This method has only been used once, to repeal Prohibition with the 21st Amendment.

Is there a timeline for ratification? The U.S. Supreme Court has held that ratification must happen within "some reasonable time after the proposal." Since the 18th Amendment was ratified, Congress has set a term of seven years for ratification.
Only 33 amendments have received a two-thirds vote from both Houses of Congress. Of those, only 27 have been ratified by the States. Perhaps the most visible failure is the Equal Rights Amendment.

Article 5 of the Constitution reads:


"The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Application of the Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a Convention for proposing Amendments, which, in either Case, shall be valid to all Intents and Purposes, as Part of this Constitution, when ratified by the Legislatures of three fourths of the several States, or by Conventions in three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may be proposed by the Congress; Provided that no Amendment which may be made prior to the Year One thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any Manner affect the first and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section of the first Article; and that no State, without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal Suffrage in the Senate."

About the 27 Amendments

Here are summaries of all the constitutional amendments:
The 1st Amendment guarantees Americans freedom of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom to assemble and freedom to petition the government.
The 2nd amendment guarantees Americans the individual right to keep and bear arms.
The 3rd Amendment prohibits the government from forcing citizens to house U.S. soldiers in peace time.
The 4th Amendment protects citizens against unwarranted police searches and seizures.
The 5th amendment grants certain rights to Americans who are accused of crimes.
The 6th Amendment establishes the rights of citizens who face trials and juries.
The 7th amendment guarantees the right to a trial by jury in federal civil court cases.
The 8th Amendment protects Americans against "cruel and unusual" criminal punishment.
The 9th Amendment states rights not specifically delineated in the Constitution should still be respected.
The 10th Amendment grants powers to the states and people when those powers are not allocated to the federal government.
The 11th amendment sets jurisdiction of the Supreme Court.
The 12th amendment defines how the Electoral College chooses the President and Vice President
The 13th Amendment abolishes slavery.
The 14th amendment grants citizenship to African Americans and those born in the United States. It grants citizens equal protection under the law at both the state and federal levels.
The 15th Amendment bans the use of race as a qualification to vote.
The 16th Amendment allows the government to collect income taxes.
The 17th Amendment states U.S. senators are to be elected and not appointed by state legislatures.
The 18th Amendment, which has been repealed, prohibited the sale and manufacture of alcoholic beverages in what became known as Prohibition.
The 19th Amendment prohibited the use of gender as a qualification to vote.
The 20th amendment states when Congress is in session.
The 21st amendment repealed Prohibition.
The 22nd Amendment limits presidents to two four-year terms.
The 23rd amendment gives Washington, D.C., electors in the Electoral College.
The 24th Amendment bans "poll taxes."
The 25th Amendment delineates the line of succession for president.
The 26th Amendment allows 18-year-old citizens the right to vote.
The 27th Amendment states members of Congress cannot raise their own salaries.

Many Thanks for your exhaustive explanation for my knowledge and culture!
 

Alaskan

Well-known member
LPF Site Supporter
Joined
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Messages
11,795
Points
113
3DLaSeRBuiLDeR, can I bribe you with a mid range cost laser diode to dump that avatar and any one like it please? It really creeps me out.
 

RedCowboy

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 10, 2015
Messages
8,250
Points
113



There are well over a quarter of a billion guns in America owned by private citizens.

It is said that 3% of Americans own 1/2 the guns but also over 1/3 of all Citizens own guns, some polls say it's really more like half of all Americans own guns.

In order to change a Constitutional amendment it takes 2/3 of both the house and senate and then must be ratified by 3/4 of all 50 States.

Here's some education for you:

Amending the Constitution is a necessarily and intentionally difficult thing to do. It's been attempted hundreds of times to address controversial issues from gay marriage to abortion rights to balancing the federal budget. And Congress has been successful only 27 times since the Constitution was signed in September 1787.

The first ten amendments are called the Bill of Rights because their aim is to protect certain freedoms granted to American citizens and to limit the power of the federal government.

The remaining 17 amendments address a variety of topics including voting rights, slavery and the sale of alcohol.

The first 10 amendments were ratified in December 1791. The most recent amendment, which prohibits Congress from giving itself a pay raise, was ratified in May 1992.

So how is the Constitution amended?

Article 5 of the Constitution outlines the process for amending the document. There are two steps: proposal and ratification.

Step 1: Proposing An Amendment

Either Congress or the states can propose an amendment to the Constitution.
Both houses of Congress must propose the amendment with a two-thirds vote. This is how all current amendments have been offered.
Two-thirds of the state legislatures must call on Congress to hold a constitutional convention.

Step 2. Ratifying An Amendment

Regardless of how the amendment is proposed, it must be ratified by the States.
Three-fourths of the state legislatures must approve of the amendment proposed by Congress, or


Three-fourths of the states must approve the amendment via ratifying conventions. This method has only been used once, to repeal Prohibition with the 21st Amendment.

Is there a timeline for ratification? The U.S. Supreme Court has held that ratification must happen within "some reasonable time after the proposal." Since the 18th Amendment was ratified, Congress has set a term of seven years for ratification.
Only 33 amendments have received a two-thirds vote from both Houses of Congress. Of those, only 27 have been ratified by the States. Perhaps the most visible failure is the Equal Rights Amendment.

Article 5 of the Constitution reads:


"The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Application of the Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a Convention for proposing Amendments, which, in either Case, shall be valid to all Intents and Purposes, as Part of this Constitution, when ratified by the Legislatures of three fourths of the several States, or by Conventions in three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may be proposed by the Congress; Provided that no Amendment which may be made prior to the Year One thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any Manner affect the first and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section of the first Article; and that no State, without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal Suffrage in the Senate."

About the 27 Amendments

Here are summaries of all the constitutional amendments:
The 1st Amendment guarantees Americans freedom of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom to assemble and freedom to petition the government.
The 2nd amendment guarantees Americans the individual right to keep and bear arms. (Note) The Supreme court upheld the 2nd Amendment is an individual right enjoyed by private Citizens.
The 3rd Amendment prohibits the government from forcing citizens to house U.S. soldiers in peace time.
The 4th Amendment protects citizens against unwarranted police searches and seizures.
The 5th amendment grants certain rights to Americans who are accused of crimes.
The 6th Amendment establishes the rights of citizens who face trials and juries.
The 7th amendment guarantees the right to a trial by jury in federal civil court cases.
The 8th Amendment protects Americans against "cruel and unusual" criminal punishment.
The 9th Amendment states rights not specifically delineated in the Constitution should still be respected.
The 10th Amendment grants powers to the states and people when those powers are not allocated to the federal government.
The 11th amendment sets jurisdiction of the Supreme Court.
The 12th amendment defines how the Electoral College chooses the President and Vice President
The 13th Amendment abolishes slavery.
The 14th amendment grants citizenship to African Americans and those born in the United States. It grants citizens equal protection under the law at both the state and federal levels.
The 15th Amendment bans the use of race as a qualification to vote.
The 16th Amendment allows the government to collect income taxes.
The 17th Amendment states U.S. senators are to be elected and not appointed by state legislatures.
The 18th Amendment, which has been repealed, prohibited the sale and manufacture of alcoholic beverages in what became known as Prohibition.
The 19th Amendment prohibited the use of gender as a qualification to vote.
The 20th amendment states when Congress is in session.
The 21st amendment repealed Prohibition.
The 22nd Amendment limits presidents to two four-year terms.
The 23rd amendment gives Washington, D.C., electors in the Electoral College.
The 24th Amendment bans "poll taxes."
The 25th Amendment delineates the line of succession for president.
The 26th Amendment allows 18-year-old citizens the right to vote.
The 27th Amendment states members of Congress cannot raise their own salaries.

In short changing the 2nd Amendment is not going to happen.
At this point in time many liberals are becoming gun owners.

>>> https://www.bing.com/search?q=many+liberals+becoming+gun+owners&qs=n&form=QBLH&sp=-1&ghc=1&pq=undefined&sc=0-17&sk=&cvid=529812EB20B549D2AA3C91E18039C6DC


Overall ownership is up but media not reporting it.

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2016/09/08/gun-ownership-is-up-in-america-so-why-isnt-media-telling-about-it.html
 
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RedCowboy

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Can I have 6 small lasers to change this avatar? :p
 
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Alaskan

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OMG, paying ransom just creates more problems!
 

RedCowboy

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He's on thin ice as it is and I everyone is holding big rocks, he should change that goofy avatar if he's not a troll, taking any bets?
 
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BowtieGuy

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Thanks Red, that chart and the explanation of the amendment change process really puts it in perspective for those who aren't familiar with the procedure, or for those of us who've been out of school for a long while. :yh:
 

RedCowboy

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Our forefathers knew all too well where they came from and how easily people forget, they gave us protection from even ourselves. ;)
 
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You are right, this avatar has broken so-called me too! but for my will NOT because you ask for it!

For the record I have never been a TROLL (forum troublemaker or someone who puts others in the bad light to earn points or rep)
You are the one that you appealed to me with that "name"!

Now I will choose a new avatar! one moment ! Done !
 
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Benm

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I mean wouldn't he at least leave behind some kind of manifesto or note to explain why he did this like 99% of the other rampage killers? In this case there's simply NOTHING to indicate the WHY.

Personally I'm wondering if he may have been coerced, drugged or brainwashed into doing this by either a group like ISIS, or elites in our own govt who wanted to push for more control.
I doubt this was in any way inspired by ISIS, as they are very loud about claiming attacks even if they are not even directly related (but other islamist terror in western countries).

In europe the availability of firearms is pretty limited in many countries, yet we do get these islamic attacks using other means like running over masses of people with lorries. These can results in tens of deaths and hundreds of injuries just as well, and are also hard to prevent.

I think the motive here is not related to any ideology, given the lack of a notice left nor any claims on responsibility for the attack by terrorist groups and such. Realistically you could have someone go 'mad' and trying to shoot as many people as possible for no reason anyone can understand.

One key diference is that this was likely a sole operator, an organized group could have caused even more damage. He surely had a big collection of weapons, but not of the type that are effective in creating the maximum possible number of casualties. I'd say that infers limited planning for the attack, apart from thinking "let me get the maximal amount of guns and ammo i can carry and go for it".
 

Seoul_lasers

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It's not the gun, or the box truck, or the fertilizer bomb, it's the bad people who kill.

Right now there are many people working on hydrogen bombs that could kill millions, will we wait until it happens to act, or kill millions to prevent it?

Either way I fear millions will die soon, and it won't be by way of a man with a gun, but it may end with a lot of men with guns, so do you think throwing away our guns will make the world safer from the bad people?
I couldn't agree more.

:wave::thanks:
 

DougDownUnder

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It's not the gun, or the box truck, or the fertilizer bomb, it's the bad people who kill.

Right now there are many people working on hydrogen bombs that could kill millions, will we wait until it happens to act, or kill millions to prevent it?

Either way I fear millions will die soon, and it won't be by way of a man with a gun, but it may end with a lot of men with guns, so do you think throwing away our guns will make the world safer from the bad people?
This is my mate right here, Hear him out if your sick of mass shootings...

 

RedCowboy

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I don't care for Australian gun laws or laser laws, but if you think people are too careless/malicious/evil and should obey the laws set to protect the public from each other, I suppose you don't own any illegal lasers pointers over 1mw output or do you ?
 
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