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Question on safety glasses

Sporkmaker

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Hi all, just have a quick question as to whether my existing glasses are adequate. I commissioned a custom 7W blue laser which should be arriving shortly. I currently have the Eagle OD4 glasses, are they up to the job or do I need to buy some with a higher rating?

Thanks!
 



Alaskan

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Here's a list showing the percentage of transmittance for different OD ratings.



Do the math to figure it out, I'd keep it down to under 1 mw transmission through the glasses for a direct hit.
 
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paul1598419

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As long as they cover the wavelengths from 445nm to 460nm.
 

hakzaw1

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WE assume they are for blue/green lasers--- on the frames it will have two numbers with nm after.
....a recent accident happened when the beam came over the 'shoulder' glancing off inside of lens and to the eye.. side shields prevent most of that possibility
 
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QuasarZX12

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Hi,
As a newcomer on the laser world, I have the following doubt using the safety googles.

I have a 5000mW 5W blue laser, and the safety googles that came with them are very cheap.
I’ve already order a good pair from Survivallaser (Eagle Pair 190-540nm OD6).

What I would like to know is if we can see the beam of the laser with the googles ?
Using the cheap ones, I can’t see it, and if you are trying to burn something using your hand, most likely one day I will burn my fingers, because I didn’t see the beam.

Can someone enlighten me ? :can:

Thanks
 
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diachi

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Hi,
As a newcomer on the laser world, I have the following doubt using the safety googles.

I have a 5000mW 5W blue laser, and the safety googles that came with them are very cheap.
I’ve already order a good para from Survivallaser (Eagle Pair 190-540nm OD6).

What I would like to know is if we can see the beam of the laser with the googles ?
Using the cheap ones, I can’t see it, and if you are trying to burn something using your hand, most likely one day I will burn my fingers, because I didn’t see the beam.

Can someone enlighten me ? :can:

Thanks
No, you can't see the beam. If you can see the beam the goggles aren't doing what they are supposed to do.

You may see an orange spot where the dot is, this is from fluorescence. That gives an indication as to where the beam is terminating.
 
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QuasarZX12

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No, you can't see the beam. If you can see the beam the goggles aren't doing what they are supposed to do.

You may see an orange spot where the dot is, this is from fluorescence. That gives an indication as to where the beam is terminating.
Ok, Thanks.
I understand that, but the beam presents no danger to hour eyes. It’s the spot where it hits an object that’s dangerous to stare at.
I just said that I’ll probably will burn my skin one of this days, because my 5w laser, even not focus to the short beam can light matches. When in focus it ignites the wood of a match.

It’s like electric arc welding , the dangerous is to stare without protection ate the point that is weld due to the its brightness.
 
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diachi

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Ok, Thanks.
I understand that, but the beam presents no danger to hour eyes. It’s the spot where it hits the object that’s dangerous to stare at.
I just said that I’ll probably will burn my skin one of this days, because my 5w laser, even not focus to the short beam can light matches. When in focus it ignites the wood of a match.

It’s like electric arc welding , the dangerous is to stare without protection ate the point that is weld due to the its brightness.
You can see where the spot is though, so you shouldn't manage to burn your hands. You just shouldn't be able to see any of the actual laser light, only the orange light from fluorescence caused by the beam.
 

QuasarZX12

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You can see where the spot is though, so you shouldn't manage to burn your hands. You just shouldn't be able to see any of the actual laser light, only the orange light from fluorescence caused by the beam.

I’m still using a wall 6 meters away as the target spot.

I need to get a clamp to attach the laser to my tripod, and a good matt black coloured tile as target closer to the laser.
 

BobMc

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As far as burning your fingers, after about 100-125, times your fingers become cauterized and they don’t hurt any more.

(Sorry had a wild hair, couldn’t help myself). :crackup: :)
 
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QuasarZX12

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As far as burning your fingers, after about 100-125, times your fingers become cauterized and they don’t hurt any more.

(Sorry had a wild hair, couldn’t help myself). :crackup: :)
Cauterized or grilled ?? :drool:
 

paul1598419

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You needn't worry about the spot on a wall as that light is not collimated and, since you can see the spot from anywhere in the room, it follows the inverse square law for light. That spot is called the illuminated spot and is larger than the actual spot. Keep this in mind if you are measuring it for divergence specifications.
 




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