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NUBM31T 95W 455nm

Philipnzw

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I don't know how to multi-reply but hey, i just wanna say thanks to alaskan, wizardg and paul.
I have a stronger understanding of TTL now.
This will come in handy for me as one of my lecturer's in my University is asking me to study Lidar tech, and iirc Lidar involves Pulses, and TTL is probably needed in such projects.

My apologies for slightly derailing the thread towards TTL.
Will post in this thread again when i find anything related to NUBM31T.
 



Light superglue

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I have asked about 10V TTL input because if I want to make a portable device with a driver like PhilipNZW found I would look for a driver with 24V input to get enough output power at modest currents (by boosting 12V to 85-110V and 3A not many batteries could provide input current for a decent time period). And thinking how to make use of TTL regulation, I run into 0-5V angle sensors on ebay but most are rated for 5V supply and only one can suport 24V input and this one looks to be 0-10V sensor. Or maybe it can be used as 0-5V sensor at 24V input, I do not know?


Anyway I would like to use main 24V battery for all and keep from adding second 5V source to the setup.
 

WizardG

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I have asked about 10V TTL input because if I want to make a portable device with a driver like PhilipNZW found I would look for a driver with 24V input to get enough output power at modest currents (by boosting 12V to 85-110V and 3A not many batteries could provide input current for a decent time period). And thinking how to make use of TTL regulation, I run into 0-5V angle sensors on ebay but most are rated for 5V supply and only one can suport 24V input and this one looks to be 0-10V sensor. Or maybe it can be used as 0-5V sensor at 24V input, I do not know?


Anyway I would like to use main 24V battery for all and keep from adding second 5V source to the setup.
Would it really be that difficult to add an extra LM7805 to the project? A portable build using this diode seems likely to be big enough that there ought to be room to fit one in.
 

Light superglue

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WizardG

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Thank you, I did not know about those votage regulators. Instruction says that all the voltage difference goes into heat - so this transistor might need a HS, right?
Or better in a module?
It might not need a heatsink if you only ask it for the very small current needed for the TTL signals and sensor(s).
 

paul1598419

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At such a low current these might not regulate well at all. I ran into this problem when trying to regulate a +5 volt supply for a PWM.
 

aaronnoraa

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The conversation on this thread is well and good but I suspect that I speak for everyone in saying that this thread needs more pictures. Lots and lots more pictures-
specifically of the unit when powered :)
for science, and stuff
 

Cyparagon

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I run into 0-5V angle sensors on ebay but most are rated for 5V supply and only one can suport 24V input and this one looks to be 0-10V sensor.
From the cursory glance I made, it's not regulated output, just proportional output to both the angle and the supply voltage.

The part you're missing is that TTL is binary. If you use this angle sensor, you're spending $65 on a tilt switch that burns power. Ebay has tilt switches for 20 cents, so I don't know why you'd spend $65 but it's your money

Anyway I would like to use main 24V battery for all and keep from adding second 5V source to the setup.
So you use a voltage divider. Although if you have to google voltage divider, that's not a hopeful starting point.
 

likevvii

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Hello,

I am looking to purchase a NUBM31T or anything similar above 50W output at 450nm.

I will be attempting to focus this to a as small point as possible (under 0.90mm diameter) at about 200mm distance. What type of optic will be necessary to do this? Based on the discussion so far, It seems to have a primary optic to make all the light parallel.

Is the last thing I will need a convex lens to focus all the parallel beams? Should I use spherical or aspherical?
Note, I will be reflecting this off a mirror once.
My planned set up:
NUBM31T > convex lens > mirror > 450nm crystal phosphor.

___
Is the NUBM31T the best available option for 50w+ ?

Thanks :)
 

paul1598419

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WHY?! You'll need to get all the beams parallel, which is much easier said than done and after your mirror they will no longer converge. So you will have several diverging beams unless you converge them after the mirror.
 

likevvii

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Thanks for the reply,

I am just using this simulation:


I am not very good with the actual number crunching physics behind optics, so I try to stick with diagrams and videos to learn about optics, or actually anything in general lol.

Since this is a simulation, maybe it does not account for a few optical properties that happen in real life?


___
What I need help on is what the special looking "multi bubble" lens does. Does it make the beam parallel?
Do I need to put like 20 individual lens instead?

It doesn't really matter what method is used as long as I can get a good focus at around 200mm away.
 

paul1598419

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Well, at only 8 inches you might get by with just using a fixed collimating lens. It is hard to say for certain. The further out you get the less parallel they seem to look. They won't be parallel in a block, but if you aren't trying to make them converge perfectly you might get by with it. Diagrams don't always show the limits of what you are actually trying to accomplish.
 

likevvii

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Yes, you are certainly right. Simulation does not account for real world variables.

In general is this(my simulation) the optimal set up for my application?
What type of condenser lens would you recommend?
 

paul1598419

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That depends on how you plan on aligning the beams. The lens diameter will have to be larger by ~20% than the outermost beams. If you just leave it in the block you might get by with a 5 inch lens. Just as a guess.
 




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