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Laser for chemistry project?

newbie

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My teacher saw me messing around with my PHR blu-ray after chemistry (11th grade) and she wants me to make something laser related for an upcoming project. She didn't have anything specific in mind, so I need to find something. I really don't know anything you can do with a laser that would really relate to chemistry. I thought about a dye, or gas laser, but I really don't know much about either of those, are they are even possible to DIY build? And would there be enough about either related to chemistry to make a project out of them?

I'm sure there is something I could do, my teacher seems to think so at least...

You guys have any ideas for what I could do?
 

jeffd

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The only thing i can think of is something having to do with fluorescent chemicals
 

mattmagic100

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The only thing i can think of is something having to do with fluorescent chemicals
ya i was gonna mention the same thing.
just google fluorescent chemicals using lasers
and im sure ull find something.
 
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Get a thick piece of clear glass, shine the PHR through it at like a 67° or so. Then talk about total internal reflection.
 

Morgan

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I was gonna suggest something similar to Niko exploring total internal reflection but isn't that really Physics rather than Chemistry?

My college Physics lab were interested in me building a green and red module with parallel beams to shine through a prism to demonstrate refraction with coherent beams rather than a white light source splitting into a spectrum. They were interested up until some helpful soul mentioned the dreaded, "Health and Safety"! Too difficult, they said. Too dangerous, they said. We can't have lasers in a college Physics lab, they said. IT'S A PHYSICS LAB! WHERE BETTER FOR LASERS TO BE?!!!!

Bureaucrats!

Rant over...

I think flourescence is more, 'Chemistry', related.

M
:)
 

Helmholtz Watson

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Lasers can be quite useful in investigating presence flocculants/colloids.
There are also many UV mediated reactions you could "activate" using a blu-ray laser.

One thing that springs to mind which would look really cool for a science fair type situation without actually being all that useful in life would be a long (Foucalt-esque) pendulum suspended from the ceiling to the floor over a large sheet of glow in the dark plastic to give a Spirograph effect that gradually fades.
 

Kenom

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Here is somethign chemically related. Go out and purchase yourself some of the UV reactant GLUE. There is a chemical reaction going on there. I've no doubt.
Although one problem I've found so far is "Activation occurs only when exposed to UV light of 250 to 350 nm"

how they work
http://www.exfo-omnicure.com/Downloads/App. Notes/UV General/How_Does_UV_Curing_Work.pdf

"HOW THEY WORK
UV adhesives absorb radiant energy from a UV light source and convert it to chemical energy so quickly that curing is practically instantaneous. So quick, in fact, that substrates experience only a brief, superficial temperature change. This lets companies use UV adhesives on heat-sensitive materials including plastic films, moldings, and synthetic fibers, as well as elastomers and paper products.

The lack of heat is particularly valuable in electrical and electronic industries where transient thermal changes can degrade a component's performance. In addition, the low heat reduces substrate shrinkage and warpage, and permits additional on-line processing and off-line handling. This eliminates having to move parts to cooling racks before they go down the line, along with the space and labor requirements.

Completely reactive UV adhesives are not oxygen-inhibited and have fast curing rates at ambient temperatures and atmospheres, though curing is faster if heat is applied. This eliminates the need for atmospheric control — a nitrogen atmosphere, for example — to get tack-free cures. Equally important, cure continues in the dark after UV exposure until all UV reacting species are consumed, thus making economical use of UV energy.

UV compounds can cure despite cross-section thicknesses up to 0.5 in. and more for specific formulations. Maximum dimensional accuracy is assured because the compounds cure with minimum shrinkage.

UV-cured bonds remain intact over temperatures ranging from –80 to 350°F. The bonds also stay intact for a long time because they resist most chemicals even in the presence of moisture and heat.

For best adhesion, substrates must be carefully cleaned of oils, greases, release agents, dirt, and other contaminants. In many cases, such as with metals and other inorganics, a simple test determines if the surface is clean. The test involves spreading a few drops of cool water on the surface. If water spreads over the area with a continuous film, parts are clean enough. But if water beads or stays in puddles, degrease the surface with an EPA-acceptable solvents such as IPA or acetone. Repeat the water test before applying UV-cure adhesives. Polyolefins, such as polyethylene and polypropylene, as well as fluorocarbon polymers such as polytetrafluoroethylene and various chlorinated fluorocarbon resins, require special surface treatments for adequate adhesion.

"http://machinedesign.com/article/uv-cure-adhesives-101-0208

Some chemical information on some specific photoinitiators
http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/ue/courses/0305-676/reference/Imprint/Photoinitiators for UV curing.pdf
 
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