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gel color filters for DIY safety glasses

runcyclexcski

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Hi all,

the following is, obviously, a do-at-your-own-risk idea, but for DIYers like myself who are not willing to pay $100 for certified laser safety glasses, I found that one can find interesting options on the Lee Filters web site, and cut the film to shape of regular wrap-around clear plexiglass glasses. E.g. my 532 nm 50 mW line is nicely removed with the following filter (gotta like the name of the color, too, 779 'bastard pink'):


Its spectrum has a nice dip right around 532, transmitting >50% above and below. Not a notch filter, for sure, but not bad for a cheap piece of plastic film ($10 is enough for 10+ pairs of goggles!). I understand that Lee also makes plexiglass versions. These, in principle, should be safer, as scratches should not reduce the performance.
 

runcyclexcski

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I agree regarding high power lasers; the 532 unit I was referring to was 50 mW. I would be curious to do side-by-side comparisons with the Eagle glasses, in terms of power damage,, and also to find out the details of the manufacturing process for coloured acrylic sold by stage filter companies (with spectra available), versus $50-$100 laser safety glasses. From what I understand, historically, laser safety goggles were used by R and D companies like Bell Labs and academic labs. Mark-ups for scientific equipment is very substantial (can be 1000x in biotech). The demand for consumer laser goggles has emerged very recently, and it may take time for prices to adjust ( I do not consider $40 a substantial savings over $100 from Thorlabs).
 

runcyclexcski

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Well, why not pay $10 000 for pair of safety glasses then? :) Surely, one's eyesight must be worth that much.
 

LSRFAQ

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Dyes used in gels are known to bleach temporary to clear in the presence of high power laser light. Its a known non-linear phenomena. They can become clear and then opaque in a few nanoseconds. The gel layer often micro-cracks when bent, too.

That is the problem of making DIY glasses, some one else reads your cheap description, makes one, takes it to a lab or uses it with the wrong type of pulsed or CW laser, and suddenly ALL protection is GONE. Those of us in the professional industry hunt down posts with DIY theatrical gel glasses described on this forum with a passion. Bulk absorbers used in tested goggles can take a hit, thin gels usually do not stand up to repeated laser strikes. For a reason. SPEND THE MONEY ON TESTED GLASSES!

Gels fade over time, too... They are made to be good for a few to a few dozen stage performances and be replaced. Lots of them are humidity sensitive. Which is why modern lighting instruments mainly use dichroic filters..

Oh, and one other thing. There is no guarantee two successive runs of Gel material will be anywhere close in dye concentration or even dye type. If its cheaper next week to produce the similar transmission spectrum with a different material, you can bet the gel company will do it.

Just DO NOT DO IT!

Steve
 
Last edited:

kecked

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50mw is a high power laser. You can toast yourself with very little power. You might not go blind at 5mw but you might have a black dot that follows you everywhere....ask me I know first hand. 50mw well your done.
 

T_Warne

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Well, why not pay $10 000 for pair of safety glasses then? :) Surely, one's eyesight must be worth that much.
Because that would be stupid. There actually are certified glasses available at reasonable prices.
 

hakzaw1

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You post like an intelligent person .. but you cannot be serious about this.
I looked quick to see if anyone did not agree with me. This may have been mentioned IDKFS.
Using sunglasses for example -- is an awful idea-- your eyes will be 'WIDE OPEN' dilated-- allowing even more light to enter and burn your retina.

PLEASE
do you know how much your 50 mW green becomes after your own eye's lens magnifies it??? MORE than 500mW.. some say much more. But even JUST double at 100 mW ==c'mon man!! We have serious things to do- we help those that need and will accept our advice and do some searching.. -I guess you could wait until you are down to just one eye working THEN start being careful for sure!!

go to tutorial section and read about safety.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
as I expected you failed to place your location into your profile-- DID you EVEN make an 'INTRO" thread in the newcomer section-- are you too kewl for that??

You should look into LED lights- there are really improved and no need to worry about one's eyes. The lasers are for grown-ups..;-(
sorry
 

CurtisOliver

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Use LPF445 and get yourself a discount on proper eye safety from SurvivalLasers. Don’t attempt to make your own using untested methods.
 

paul1598419

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Dyes used in gels are known to bleach temporary to clear in the presence of high power laser light. Its a known non-linear phenomena. They can become clear and then opaque in a few nanoseconds. The gel layer often micro-cracks when bent, too.

That is the problem of making DIY glasses, some one else reads your cheap description, makes one, takes it to a lab or uses it with the wrong type of pulsed or CW laser, and suddenly ALL protection is GONE. Those of us in the professional industry hunt down posts with DIY theatrical gel glasses described on this forum with a passion. Bulk absorbers used in tested goggles can take a hit, thin gels usually do not stand up to repeated laser strikes. For a reason. SPEND THE MONEY ON TESTED GLASSES!

Gels fade over time, too... They are made to be good for a few to a few dozen stage performances and be replaced. Lots of them are humidity sensitive. Which is why modern lighting instruments mainly use dichroic filters..

Oh, and one other thing. There is no guarantee two successive runs of Gel material will be anywhere close in dye concentration or even dye type. If its cheaper next week to produce the similar transmission spectrum with a different material, you can bet the gel company will do it.

Just DO NOT DO IT!

Steve
I have been expecting this thread to die for this very reason. I hope others will not feel the need to keep it going.
 

Cyparagon

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I get what you're trying to say, runcyclexcski. But even a $5 ebay pair of safety glasses will be more robust than the gel idea.
 




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