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ArcticMyst Security by Avery

Dr's use laser to kill eye worm.






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A 1W 445 the doctor had just made in his own custom host.
Being a laser fan has its uses ^_^
 
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Gah, the idea of having a worm in my eye gives me chills. Something about parasites... Other than having eye surgery I think that would be the only time I'd be more than willing to have someone shine a laser in my eye.
 
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urgh, having worms inside your eye? Ranks right up there with tapeworm and the like in terms of :barf:ness.
 
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It was probably a YAG laser like is already used for several different types of eye-related medical procedures. They can carefully aim and focus those things quite well inside the eye without causing damage.
 
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What laser did they use?

As usual for "news" they don't say, but a general eye-surgery laser tends to be a tunable dye laser.
Tuning up through IR allows them to select absorption or transmission through the eye tissue.
 
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I assume they left the "worm" in there after they killed it... Don't you think it could get infected and stuff?
 
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YUMMM!! You know what I love more then lasers shot into my eyes?? Worms being absorbed through my eyes! :barf: :scared:
 

LSRFAQ

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As usual for "news" they don't say, but a general eye-surgery laser tends to be a tunable dye laser.
Tuning up through IR allows them to select absorption or transmission through the eye tissue.

I have to differ here, as I get many of my parts from a medical service engineer.
Dye has not been in regular eye use for 10-15 years. Even then it was mainly for photodynamic therapy, a cancer treatment, and rare.

Argon, CW yag at 532, and pulsed yag at 1064 are the eye surgery lasers of choice, with a rare krypton switchable from red to yellow green. Some treatments of the iris use 808, but it is not a good solution.

Qswitched 1064 at a few millijoules and 7-10 nanoseconds would be the worm blaster of choice, followed by CW green from a argon or DPSS. The worm is common in Egypt and Africa, parts of South America, and its in the river water. You could not pay me to swim in the Nile because of it.

A case happening from exposure in the US would scare me, as its very, very uncommon here.

Google "River Blindness"

Steve
 
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Yep, I'm thinking a Green Yag, was probably the easier way to go, because they are routinely used for work inside the eye such as burning blood vessels to remove them.

On another note if I had to choose, I think I would also avoid swimming in nasty river water(in the Amazon) to avoid the Candiru, which could result in.........

"Penectomy is generally preferred to the misery and pain associated with leaving the fish in the urethra"

Candiru: Vampire Fish
 
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I... Dye has not been in regular eye use for 10-15 years ... Argon, CW yag at 532, and pulsed yag at 1064 are the eye surgery lasers of choice...
My old man's in the business and their research lab consists of (a minimum of) Er:YAG (2940nm...) / Nd:YAG (photocoagulation) / CO2 (ext. uses such as dermatological) / 830, 940, 980, 1880 & 1930 lasers.

The above are all tied in with medical applications in one way or another ( mainly for Ophthalmic applications). The problem with these "worms" is that they tend to bore through the optic nerve and/or macular region resulting in (a minimum of) permanent blindness (whoever compared that to tape worms, well, I'd rather take on a tape worm...).


EDIT: Sorry, I'm talking about a different "worm", aka Toxocara - roundworms...

EDIT2: Here's some good shots of the worm cruising the retina...
http://www.optometry.co.uk/articles/docs/ef375c9dc991a3d3426654793739e9ee_Myint.pdf
 
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