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ACEBEAM Wide Spectrum BLOS (Beyond-Line-of-Sight) Searchlight VS Other Laser Light

ACEBEAM

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ACEBEAM Wide Spectrum BLOS (Beyond-Line-of-Sight) Searchlight W10 & W30 compared with Other Laser Light





 
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Alaskan

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Trying to find the divergence of this device now.

Edit: Divergence found on one web site to be 1.8 degrees, over 30 mRad. 1 degree about 17.45 mRad.
 
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Alaskan

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Thanks, based on 17.45 mRad per degree 31.45 mRad. Our laser pointers are often 1.5 to 3.6 mRad, up to about 11 mRad for the NUBM44 laser diode when collimated with a ~6 mm diameter lens.
 

steve001

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Yes, it’s a flashlight, but a very tight beam for such.
We know this device uses a led phosphore (P) excited by a blue or violet laser to produce white light. I wonder what result could be produced by exciting such a phosphore with a collimated beam expander (BE)
A schematic. LASER ---(BE)(P)=====
Ebay sells phosphore sheets.
 

Alaskan

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My understanding from something Cyparagon, (or maybe it was Paul) posted a couple of years or more ago is the florescence is not at all coherent, so focusing a beam on the material whether collimated, or uncollimated cannot produce anything different.
 

steve001

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My understanding from something Cyparagon, (or maybe it was Paul) posted a couple of years or more ago is the florescence is not at all coherent, so focusing a beam on the material whether collimated, or uncollimated cannot produce anything different.
Actually the Acebeam' s beam is collimated, though poorly. I still wonder what result would be produced. Would it create a flood effect or a semi narrow beam?
 

Alaskan

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Donno, I know they collimate the florescence, would be interesting to see if, or what difference it might make or not, I expect little to nil.
 

BowtieGuy

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The larger W30 version is the unit that BobMc posted a thread and video on a few days ago.
As a long throwing tight beamed flashlight, this W30 is very impressive IMO; I don't think that it's intended to be a laser competitor, heck if the divergance was too good, it would be useless as a flashlight.

@ ACEBEAM, nice photo of these along side of some lasers. :)
 

paul1598419

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The title of this thread kept me away as it is NOT a white laser! As for long throwing flashlights, I suppose it could be useful there, but they shouldn't claim it as a laser.
 

steve001

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The title of this thread kept me away as it is NOT a white laser! As for long throwing flashlights, I suppose it could be useful there, but they shouldn't claim it as a laser.
Technically they aren't wrong. They say, "white laser light". Both units and similar cars headlights use a laser as the source.
 

Alaskan

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Well, it has a laser inside, but I agree, a bit misleading, however, closer to a laser at 31 mRad than any hand held flashlight I know about.
 

steve001

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Well, it has a laser inside, but I agree, a bit misleading, however, closer to a laser at 31 mRad than any hand held flashlight I know about.
That's why I said "technically".
Led filament light bulbs work from the same principle. I took one apart and discovered the phosphor is a silicone sleeve covering the diodes.
 

paul1598419

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Technically they aren't wrong. They say, "white laser light". Both units and similar cars headlights use a laser as the source.
Technically, they are. I did several experiments a few years ago with fluorescent materials excited by a laser and measured the output with my spectrometer. The outputs were FAR from coherent light and had a basic output similar to LEDs, but much wider.
 




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