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Variable optics - Liquid lenses

Junkers

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This is a bit of a broadly focused topic on something I discovered the other day. I'm not sure if this exists in the realm of commercial laser optics but thought I might throw it out there to see what you guys think. There may be a good reason as to why it hasn't surfaced, but other than a single company holding the patents and price gouging, I'm not sure what it may be. I'm sure there will be the issue of what fluids are used in the lens relative to what wavelength you are trying to pass through but surely some bands will pass with good transmittance.

I read this paper where they managed to steer the focal point by separating the capacitor into quadrants and applying respective AM sine waves. I also skimmed across this thesis where they explored the concept with regard to laser focusing. All in all, very cool concept. Does anyone know much about these and care to shed any light on them?
 
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kecked

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It can be done but it’s not practical. I played with it but keeping an accurate wavefront is nearly impossible and the range is small. Play why not. It was fun. Part of the challenge if finding a clear surface that deforms but holds its shape. Much easier with two glass lens and motor
 

Alaskan

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I've been waiting for variable liquid lenses to take off, haven't seen one yet myself but I imagine, they will eventually become more common.
 

Alaskan

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Nice. Since they have water in them, I hope they can be used at cold sub zero F. temperatures, otherwise their applications are limited, but with water in them, I guess it's a given they cannot.
 

paul1598419

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The optical liquids I have seen in my lifetime are not water, so this may not even be an issue. There are optical grade ethylene glycols. They don't freeze at 0* C.
 

Alaskan

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The EO diagram shows water and oil layers is why I had that impression, maybe too simplified.

 
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Cyparagon

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If you're going to all the trouble of designing an electrical focus system, why not go with an electromechanical focus instead? It's cheaper, easier to drive, less lossy... I can't really think of a single advantage that a liquid lens would have.
 

Junkers

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For me it's about combining the function of a galvanometer with an F theta lens, they cost a fortune.
 




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