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The thread about "real" goggles/glasses. . .

GSS

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I wouldn't go with the blue lensed glasses for red lasers. Those seem to be the only cheap ones that don't work. They actually do "nothing" for red. Some say they work maby a tiny bit for 638nm red's but not the 650's or 660's. They won't even stop a dollar store cat toy. If you can get a pair for $1 or $2 dollars i would buy them just so you see how bad they are..
I don't believe the greens lenses do a thing for red laser and are rated 450nm max.
I won some bids on 4 cheapies for a $1 each and did do a destruction test. Surprisingly they did well with up to 5W.
It's a crap shoot though and should always test them from the side..

Edit: If I can I will try to upload some pic's of the blue lensed and a red laser.
Also Uvex makes some cheap priced orange glasses that work well with a 2W blue laser. They aren't made for laser safety though, they are industrial projectile glasses that just happen to work with blue lasers.
 



MajorLazor

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These should be fine for a Sanwu pocket 800mW 445nm laser?

(the reason I'm getting the IR band, too, is because I have a cheap, green 301 laser)

Also, regarding when to use the glasses, I'm still a little confused as to if they're needed when viewing the laser spot (like when burning). According to this safety sheet for class 4 lasers, it says:

EYE INJURY HAZARD - DIFFUSE REFLECTION
The scattered light from the laser "dot" as viewed on a surface, can be an eye hazard. Avoid looking directly at the laser dot for more than a few seconds. The light is too bright if you see a sustained afterimage, lasting more than about 10 seconds.

The more powerful the laser, and the closer your eye is to the laser dot, the greater the chance of injury. This can occur during certain actions, such as aligning the beam or trying to hold the laser dot on a fixed location in order to burn a material.

Some Laser Safety Facts labels will list the laser’s specific diffuse reflection hazard distance. If this is not listed, here are some example Class 4 lasers:

  • Looking at the laser dot from a 1,000 milliwatt (1 Watt) Class 4 blue (445 nm) laser beam for more than 1 minute is an eye hazard within 1.5 ft (44 cm) of the laser.
So in theory, it's OK to glance a the dot briefly? In practice, though, it's always a good idea to be wearing the glasses when burning or using the laser, right?
 

Encap

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(y) Right.

Accidents are accidents/unintended and with lasers accidents happen so fast there is no possibility of making a correction while in progress.
Better to prevent the possibility of an eye damaging laser accident than be one looking for a place to happen.

Excellent choice of glasses. Eagle Pair are good quality laser safety glasses.

See: https://laserpointerforums.com/threads/hit-in-eye-with-1000mw-445nm-blue-laser.69469/
 
Last edited:

paul1598419

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I look at diffused reflections from my lasers all the time without goggles. Not anywhere near as close as 1.5 feet, but from 10 to 12 feet and over many years of doing this I have experienced no injury to my eyes. And the tiny amount of IR from a 301 laser is negligible. It also follows the visible beam for the most part until it diverges which then makes it harmless.
 

MajorLazor

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I look at diffused reflections from my lasers all the time without goggles. Not anywhere near as close as 1.5 feet, but from 10 to 12 feet and over many years of doing this I have experienced no injury to my eyes. And the tiny amount of IR from a 301 laser is negligible. It also follows the visible beam for the most part until it diverges which then makes it harmless.
Wondering if this is due to IR leakage? The first shot is in the visible range with the diffraction grating attached. The second one is the same thing, but shot with an IR-converted camera (850 nm). Since this filter should block out anything below 850 nm, I'm thinking there's definitely IR being emitted from my 301-style laser?
65043

65044
 

paul1598419

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Sure, there is some IR leakage with those 532nm 301 pointers, but if the actual power is 80 mW, the total IR component is ~12 mW and it diverges faster than the visible light. Why be concerned about such a small amount when it follows the visible beam and, once it diverges enough to be able to hit your eye without the visible beam doing so, it is no longer more than a tiny fraction of a mW. If you are going to worry, do it about the green collimated light. The IR is inconsequencial.
 

MajorLazor

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Thanks. Yeah, the IR doesn't seem like too big a deal. The intensity doesn't seem all that strong. FWIW, I have an IR flashlight, and if I shine that on the same wall and look with my IR camera, it looks brighter than the IR leakage from the laser.
 

paul1598419

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I have a 1+ watt 808nm laser that I built some time ago. I use an IR camera to collimate the beam, though the dot is faintly visible as a dark red dot.
 




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