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Superglue trick

Pman

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So, I was watching stuff on YouTube testing things like what epoxy and duct tape are the best with some really great scientific ways to tell and happened to come across something I've never heard of. Using regular old superglue in a different cool way.
All you do is apply superglue to whatever you want and then sprinkle it with baking soda which happens to be a great catalyst and in about 5 seconds it turns rock hard actually getting quite warm in the process because it cures so fast. You can keep adding more superglue and more baking soda to build it up and fill gaps and its really awesome. It becomes something like cement and people say it is 5x stronger.
I tried it out on a phone charging cord that had one wire broken. I soldered it back together and didn't cover the ground wire or it with any kind of electrical insulation and just spread the wires apart enough so they wouldn't touch and then proceeded to do the superglue thing and it worked perfect.
Try messing with it yourself and see what things you can come up with to use it for.
I have a LOT of different glues/epoxy and this is kind of a game changer for some applications not to mention how cheep you can buy superglue and baking soda!
Hope this little tip helps a lot of you guys out:)

Pete
 
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RedCowboy

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Very interesting and long time no see, hows you Pman ?
 

Pman

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Thanks. Going to post what's been up.
 

Nordhavn

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Yeah that's called "kicking". There's spray kickers too where you can lay a bead of this stuff (thicker, older CA works best) then you spritz it and watch the magic happen. Back in the 80s when I was into model rocketry this trick was often used to re-attach a fin that came off so we would be flying again in no time!
 

Pman

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So weird that I've never heard of it until a few days ago. Really cool. Going to try it on lots of stuff to see it actual effectiveness with different materials.
If anyone else has some cool tricks like this be sure and share.

I posted in the vet section about what I've been up to.
 
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Nordhavn

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Here's a kicker that's pretty good:

https://www.amazon.com/Bob-Smith-151-Insta-Set-Accelerator/dp/B0000DD1QR

The stuff we used crazed all over the place and wasn't plastic friendly. Looks like they've come some ways in fixing that as well as the weaker bond strength of the previous mixes and definitely homemade solutions. When you need something repaired INSTANTLY this is the way to go.

I just don't let ANY CA get near optics. De-hazing is a real PIA and oftentimes the aggressive cleaning that's needed invokes permanent scarring on AR surfaces. That's generally OK with camera optics but is a death sentence to laser optics.
 

Hap

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Pman is posting lots now! :D

-Alex
 

Radim

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So, I was watching stuff on YouTube testing things like what epoxy and duct tape are the best with some really great scientific ways to tell and happened to come across something I've never heard of. Using regular old superglue in a different cool way.
All you do is apply superglue to whatever you want and then sprinkle it with baking soda which happens to be a great catalyst and in about 5 seconds it turns rock hard actually getting quite warm in the process because it cures so fast. You can keep adding more superglue and more baking soda to build it up and fill gaps and its really awesome. It becomes something like cement and people say it is 5x stronger.
I tried it out on a phone charging cord that had one wire broken. I soldered it back together and didn't cover the ground wire or it with any kind of electrical insulation and just spread the wires apart enough so they wouldn't touch and then proceeded to do the superglue thing and it worked perfect.
Try messing with it yourself and see what things you can come up with to use it for.
I have a LOT of different glues/epoxy and this is kind of a game changer for some applications not to mention how cheep you can buy superglue and baking soda!
Hope this little tip helps a lot of you guys out:)

Pete

Not really what you are looking for, but check this:


:crackup:
:crackup:
:crackup:

Sorry guys, I had to... :D

Edit:

For duct tape see Mythbusters episodes related. They did awesome stuff from ductape. Cannon (yes firing real cannon balls), boat (with sail), plane (flying and tested), various stress experiments, etc... I really love duct tape and use it often. BTW: The best friend in need during laserpainting...
 
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Nordhavn

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So would this be comparable to jb quick?
Quickset epoxy has too short of a work time and its accelerated hardening profile tends to make it too weak for serious jobs.

I'm a Belzona e-metal user myself. The long work times and superior sheer strength make for long lasting repairs. You know the temporary solutions that become permanent. :D
 

paul1598419

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Thanks for posting again, Pman. It is good to see you again. I have found among two part epoxies that the fastest curing is also the weakest as well. I tend to stay away from cyanoacrylate as it has fumes that can deposit on optics, so I use it very little.
 
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Pman

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Thanks for others posts. One of my favorite things to do to contribute here was/is sharing practical information like this kind of stuff. I hit my quota for repping today.
Yes, super glue MUST be kept away from optics!!! Good on ya for pointing that out.
Also for the faster the cure the weaker the bond usually is. Noticed that a long time ago on the product labeling. There's just so many kinds of glue and tape now its good to investigate so you don't waste your money.
I have NOT tested the super glue yet other than that one way I described and I wasn't trying to say it's the best at anything. I think its really cool though:)
always a good idea to have some nail polish remover around too. Really good cleaner for some things besides the obvious super glue finger releasing;)

I've missed you guys....
 
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paul1598419

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Yes. I keep acetone around in place of fingernail polish remover to remove super glue and also fingernail polish which I use in place of Loktite. I use acrylic lenses for these Sharp diode builds because glass lenses give a rectangular artifact to the side of the dot. It is a reflection of the emitter of the diode, but it is annoying, none the less. The lens housing on the acrylic lenses is too short, so I use fingernail polish to adhere it to the focus ring or knob. If you make a mistake and have to do it over, the acetone removes all traces of it.

Of course you need to keep it off the lens.
 

Nordhavn

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Nothing more annoying than having CA on your fingers trying to get it off!

On my DPSS' I usually tack elements together with low voc adhesive that's got enough give to move that last little bit to get the most stable TEMoo output. When it looks good, I'll mix up some standard clear epoxy adhesive and while mixing on a sheet of PTFE add in some black acrylic paint so it turns the resin very dark, opaque. This way there's little spillage of 532 that can bounce around the inside of the head and wind up causing artifacts beyond the expander. I did a few Viashos that had dirty output and they cleaned up nice.
 




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