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Star Trek TOS Phaser's Laser Modded For Sale..

paul1598419

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That reminds me I found the old tracking number DTR used that he didn't send anything with. He mailed my replacement NDB7675 out two days ago, so I should have it before the end of the week. Thanks, Jordan.
 



Benm

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In the original series they were blue-except when they were not! What's that 470 nm?View attachment 61933View attachment 61934
Yeah, that does look a bit in the range of 470 or 445, as well as tv could reproduce color at the TOS era.

I'm more of TNG era guy though, and to me star trek phasers have always been sort of orange - both the handheld ones and the ones used on ships. Afaik they have been this sort of color even since, both in tv series and movies.

I have no idea when that change was decided on, but in star trek i associate orange phasers with friendly fire and various other colors with enemy fire - often green (klingon, romulan, borg) or perhaps something like purple (cardassian?). I think they did it so it's easier to the viewer to differentiate friendly from enemy fire when watching the show and all it's spin offs etc.

I'm sure there are plenty of exceptions to be found to this, but in general i'd think an earth/alliance shot is orange, and any other color is enemy - except perhaps when fighting the borg and the alliance phasers rotate through a rainbow of colors to prevent them adapting to them or something like that.
 

GSS

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I think alot of the color difference had to do to what ever film or materials they had on hand to splice in the beam shot. This was 1960's special tech and don't know the specifics. They didn't have a big budget either, I think all of the Tricorders used alone were all made for $7000. Some sights even show the original billing slip for them.
I know the original "hero" version phasers had a tiny light bulb at the tip that lit when the actors triggered it to help the special tech people.
Looking at the bottom lighter blue phaser, the beam isn't close to the tip of this one. Has to be one of the "midgrade: static props that had no functions at all.
 
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paul1598419

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I saw all the Star Trek episodes in first run, so I never saw what props cost. I did see something back then that showed outtakes as the automatic doors were actually opened and closed by stage hands and they didn't always open or close flawlessly. Outtakes were always entertaining. :)
 

Pelagius

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GSS: Interesting info!!

"I think alot of the color difference had to do to what ever film or materials they had on hand to splice in the beam shot. This was 1960's special tech and don't know the specifics. They didn't have a big budget either, I think all of the Tricorders used alone were all made for $7000. Some sights even show the original billing slip for them.
I know the original "hero" version phasers had a tiny light bulb at the tip that lit when the actors triggered it to help the special tech people.
Looking at the bottom lighter blue phaser, the beam isn't close to the tip of this one. Has to be one of the "midgrade: static props that had no functions at all."


Yeah, that does look a bit in the range of 470 or 445, as well as tv could reproduce color at the TOS era.

I'm more of TNG era guy though, and to me star trek phasers have always been sort of orange - both the handheld ones and the ones used on ships. Afaik they have been this sort of color even since, both in tv series and movies.

I have no idea when that change was decided on, but in star trek i associate orange phasers with friendly fire and various other colors with enemy fire - often green (klingon, romulan, borg) or perhaps something like purple (cardassian?). I think they did it so it's easier to the viewer to differentiate friendly from enemy fire when watching the show and all it's spin offs etc.

I'm sure there are plenty of exceptions to be found to this, but in general i'd think an earth/alliance shot is orange, and any other color is enemy - except perhaps when fighting the borg and the alliance phasers rotate through a rainbow of colors to prevent them adapting to them or something like that.
Benm: For me Star Trek has Kirk, Spock, McCoy, Scotty, Uhura, Chekov and Sulu. I did like TNG quite a lot-but I grew up with the original-"TOS." They did standardize on Orange for some reason.
 
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Benm

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I saw all the Star Trek episodes in first run, so I never saw what props cost. I did see something back then that showed outtakes as the automatic doors were actually opened and closed by stage hands and they didn't always open or close flawlessly. Outtakes were always entertaining. :)
I bet quite some of the actors walked into doors that were supposed to open automatically, and they probably still do.

Automatic sliding doors are quire common in the real world nowadays, but using the on movie sets isn't always that easy since you'd still need to fit the whole mechanism into a film set, and they aren't -that- reliable either in confined spaces (radar beams bouncing around and door openers triggered by movement of stuff that's not really directly in front of the door).

Also they need to add in the sort of pneumatic-operation sound effect in anyway, so real world sliding door makes a sound like that except those on subways and trains, but those don't slide, they swivel mostly.


As for the phaser beams in the TOS: I presume those were actually hand drawn in, frame by frame. By the time of TNG computers could do suc special effects. Back in the 60's the most 'special effect' was probably chromakeying (green screen).
 

GSS

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Glad it made it to it's destination safe...
Hope you like it. Did you play with the focus yet?
 
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Pelagius

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Glad it made it to it's destination safe...
Hope you like it. Did you play with the focus yet?
In my best Scotty imitation. Aye Captain! I was able ta remove tha emitter and use me hypersonic fingers ta adjust focus. Tha dilithium crystal is holdin' and I'm not seein' any fluctuations. I should be able ta give ya weapons fire but we'll havta recharge the dilithium cystals usin' tha Nitecore power transmitter and that'll take hours. We kin get more dilithium crystals from Star Base Ebay.
 
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paul1598419

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I bet quite some of the actors walked into doors that were supposed to open automatically, and they probably still do.

Automatic sliding doors are quire common in the real world nowadays, but using the on movie sets isn't always that easy since you'd still need to fit the whole mechanism into a film set, and they aren't -that- reliable either in confined spaces (radar beams bouncing around and door openers triggered by movement of stuff that's not really directly in front of the door).

Also they need to add in the sort of pneumatic-operation sound effect in anyway, so real world sliding door makes a sound like that except those on subways and trains, but those don't slide, they swivel mostly.


As for the phaser beams in the TOS: I presume those were actually hand drawn in, frame by frame. By the time of TNG computers could do suc special effects. Back in the 60's the most 'special effect' was probably chromakeying (green screen).

Yep. Sometimes only one of the doors would open and the actors did walk into them on occasions. It was a whole lot of fun to watch back then. I wonder if they still have those outtakes as they would still be hilarious today.
 

GSS

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Yep. Sometimes only one of the doors would open and the actors did walk into them on occasions. It was a whole lot of fun to watch back then. I wonder if they still have those outtakes as they would still be hilarious today.
There are some Utube blooper video's out there:) They had to be so so hard to find as not much of anything of the original series is left.
 

paul1598419

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That's too bad. I don't think it was nearly as popular in first run as it became in reruns and a lot of those outtakes were lost when the show was cancelled. It wasn't until 1987 that the STNG began and it took me quite awhile to like it as much as the original series.
 

Pelagius

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That's too bad. I don't think it was nearly as popular in first run as it became in reruns and a lot of those outtakes were lost when the show was cancelled. It wasn't until 1987 that the STNG began and it took me quite awhile to like it as much as the original series.
That is a shame! I never warmed to TNG to the same extent as TOS. I did like Patrick Stuart as Captain Picard though. Never really took to the Jonathan Frakes character-although Data was fun! Wesley?? I did like Deanna Troi and Worf.
 

paul1598419

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I never understood what the Wesley character was doing on that show. Did he ever do anything after TNG? It took me at least a year to start to like that show when it first appeared. I was not a Jonathan Frakes fan, but I guess it helped his career to some extent. Patrick Stuart was already famous as a science fiction character as he was in Dune. I guess it never entertained me as much as Roddenberry's first attempt. Then after TNG they started spinning off all sorts of series. The one with Kate Mildew was one of the worst.
 

Pelagius

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I never understood what the Wesley character was doing on that show. Did he ever do anything after TNG? It took me at least a year to start to like that show when it first appeared. I was not a Jonathan Frakes fan, but I guess it helped his career to some extent. Patrick Stuart was already famous as a science fiction character as he was in Dune. I guess it never entertained me as much as Roddenberry's first attempt. Then after TNG they started spinning off all sorts of series. The one with Kate Mildew was one of the worst.
Kate Mildew! I marginally liked that show. I thought Ben Sisko on DS9 was kind of dull. Never really saw Enterprise. I go though LONG periods of not watching any TV. Still it might be worth watching TNG. I probably watched less than half of the episodes (not watching ANY TV).
 




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