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Safety Glasses

Ponz

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I have a pair of UVEX SCT ORANGE XTR
SCT SPECTRUM -
#S1933X

I just bought a 5 WATT Blue. Will these suffice?

Thanks,
Ponz
 



GSS

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I believe the UVEX glasses you have are for projectile and blue light blocking.
Members tested them with a 1W or 2W blue laser and noticed they block that power with a quick strike. They aren't made for laser's though so you are most likely pushing the danger zone..
 

Encap

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Those glasses are not laser glasses-----the description is "Uvex Skyper Blue Light Blocking Computer Glasses With Sct-Orange Lens Up to 98% of all blue light emitted from backlit screens like computers and smartphones is eliminated by these glasses. "

Blue light from a 5W blue lasers is thousands of times more intense than blue light from a phone or computer screen. To pretend otherwise is to risk your eyesight

EAGLE Pair laser glasses are the way to go see: https://www.survivallaser.com/Safety_Goggles/cat556089_826120.aspx
 

Ponz

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I understand everything you guys are saying. Check out my test results please:

1) If I shine my low power < 200 mw green pointer though the lens of these glasses I can see a faint green dot on the wall behind the glasses.
2) If I shine the 5 WATT blue pointer through the lens of these glasses absolutely NO, ZERO light passes through the lens.

What am I missing here? If no light passes through, aren't they working like they're supposed to?

Thanks in advance,
Ponz
 

GSS

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I hear you but glasses are not where you want to go cheap.
$40 for Eagles is just about a 1 good order of Chinese food or 3 subs at a pizza joint. Plus you will always have them..:whistle:
Use the UVEX as backups or friends.
The Eagles will also protect you from the 532 green..
 

Snecho

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$40 or a lifetime of permanent eye damage and thousands of dollars for eye surgery. You choose. :)

Protect your eyes. You only get one pair for life.
 
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hwang21

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Personally, if a pair of goggles does not have an OD rating stamped on them, I'm not using them for lasers... it's that simple. There are people who have lost their vision even with laser-rated goggles on - why? Because (plastic) laser goggles are rated for an accidental (<0.25 sec) exposure. They are not meant for you to go looking into a laser beam with, they are meant for that extreme case when a laser rolling off the table happens to flash past your eyes. Which means, yes, your UVEX goggles may be blocking all of the 5W blue light, but where is that light going? Most likely, your goggles are absorbing it (and turning the photons into heat). How do you think cheap dyed plastic that is specifically known to be very efficient at absorbing blue light react to 5W of concentrated blue light in a small spot, knowing that the goggles were never intended to come in contact with light that intense to begin with? We sacrifice laser goggles to test them... we don't use them after we've tested lasers on them

Point being, yes, your goggles may have sufficed, but a) they won't be OK anymore anyways since you've deliberately shined a 5W laser at them to test them, which likely at least partially melted the plastic, and b) why risk your eyes anyway? We don't even have a working eye transplant procedure yet, and even a trip to the ophthalmologist will cost more than an OD-rated pair of laser goggles...
 

Snecho

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Personally, if a pair of goggles does not have an OD rating stamped on them, I'm not using them for lasers... it's that simple. There are people who have lost their vision even with laser-rated goggles on - why? Because (plastic) laser goggles are rated for an accidental (<0.25 sec) exposure. They are not meant for you to go looking into a laser beam with, they are meant for that extreme case when a laser rolling off the table happens to flash past your eyes. Which means, yes, your UVEX goggles may be blocking all of the 5W blue light, but where is that light going? Most likely, your goggles are absorbing it (and turning the photons into heat). How do you think cheap dyed plastic that is specifically known to be very efficient at absorbing blue light react to 5W of concentrated blue light in a small spot, knowing that the goggles were never intended to come in contact with light that intense to begin with? We sacrifice laser goggles to test them... we don't use them after we've tested lasers on them

Point being, yes, your goggles may have sufficed, but a) they won't be OK anymore anyways since you've deliberately shined a 5W laser at them to test them, which likely at least partially melted the plastic, and b) why risk your eyes anyway? We don't even have a working eye transplant procedure yet, and even a trip to the ophthalmologist will cost more than an OD-rated pair of laser goggles...
Yes, I'm glad someone finally mentioned that goggles are only meant to profect sudden flashes of exposure. Those UVEX should definitely be thrown away at this point.
 

Ponz

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Guys,

I am, by no means, trying to be argumentative. I'm merely sharing what I've learned. Isn't that what this forum is all about?

I have 3 pair of these glasses and sacrificed one pair for testing. As hwang21 stated, yes the plastic is absorbing the heat and they did in fact char, melt and eventually burned a hole right through.

Honestly, doesn't that indicate that they would be good enough to view a burn with, or for the accidental (<0.25 sec) exposure?

I'm sure many of you are familiar with this young mans' videos. Please check out this particular video. Fast Forward to 8:00 into the video (if you don't want to watch the whole thing) where he tests a pair of Eagle Survival Laser Goggles with a near 7 watt laser. That is exactly how the UVEX are performing:


Again - I'm am not trying to argue and certainly don't want to alienate myself and continue to welcome your comments.

John Ponzo
Ponz
 

GSS

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I don't see you as argumentative..
A while back I bid and bought 5 pairs of cheapie generic ebay glasses for $1.25 each to torture test them.
I wish I can say they failed bad but they didn't. The red lensed one's and green lensed one's stopped up to a 5W laser for a good 30 seconds.
But,,,,,the glasses were all over the place as far as thickness and build quality. Iv'e seen other tests where a 5W laser went through them like they were missing lenses.
You just never know what you will get as there is no QC and that is the issue. Just to know the blue lensed ones for red lasers are useless.
I know you tested the UVEX pair and they work but in time I would hope you get a pair of Eagles as they are the best hobby laser glasses.
 

hwang21

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You're not coming across as argumentative, I just wasn't aware that you were testing the goggles - I thought you were claiming that "x pair of goggles is good cuz I shined my laser at them and I didn't see funky colors for the rest of the day" ;)

It's just that, given the low cost of safety goggles rated and designed for laser purposes, I don't see it being worth the risk of wearing goggles that are not designed for laser use. Yes, in a pinch, those goggles would probably be fine. But why risk it? It is hard for me to recommend any kind of safety equipment that is not rated for said safety measures, since inevitably, someone on the interwebs will see this thread, buy said safety equipment, use it in situations that it was not designed for, accidentally hurt themselves, and then give us all a bad rep for it. Plus, the QC of those goggles could be OD>4 nominal, OD>1 minimum. Or even OD>1 nominal, OD>4 maximum. So you could just need to be unlucky once with a pair of those goggles to be permanently blinded, even if 95% of them really are at OD4 spec. Just some food for thought
 

Ponz

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You're not coming across as argumentative, I just wasn't aware that you were testing the goggles - I thought you were claiming that "x pair of goggles is good cuz I shined my laser at them and I didn't see funky colors for the rest of the day" ;)

It's just that, given the low cost of safety goggles rated and designed for laser purposes, I don't see it being worth the risk of wearing goggles that are not designed for laser use. Yes, in a pinch, those goggles would probably be fine. But why risk it? It is hard for me to recommend any kind of safety equipment that is not rated for said safety measures, since inevitably, someone on the interwebs will see this thread, buy said safety equipment, use it in situations that it was not designed for, accidentally hurt themselves, and then give us all a bad rep for it. Plus, the QC of those goggles could be OD>4 nominal, OD>1 minimum. Or even OD>1 nominal, OD>4 maximum. So you could just need to be unlucky once with a pair of those goggles to be permanently blinded, even if 95% of them really are at OD4 spec. Just some food for thought

Help me better understand the OD factor. I thought it determined the amount of light that passed through - no?

How can I test the OD factor? Remember, zero light passes through, at least to the naked eye.

Ponz
 

GSS

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A OD1 rating will reduce the strength of a laser by 10. Meaning a 1W or 1000mW laser will be 100mW after it passes.
A OD2 rating will reduce by a 100 meaning a 1W will do 10mW. OD3 will reduce by 1000 so a 1W will do 1mW.
So a 5W through a OD3 will be 5mW. With todays powers a OD4 is minimum..
 

Ponz

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A OD1 rating will reduce the strength of a laser by 10. Meaning a 1W or 1000mW laser will be 100mW after it passes.
A OD2 rating will reduce by a 100 meaning a 1W will do 10mW. OD3 will reduce by 1000 so a 1W will do 1mW.
So a 5W through a OD3 will be 5mW. With todays powers a OD4 is minimum..

OK - I get that. In my case with the UVEX glasses I have, if absolutely no light passes through them what would the OD rating be? I'm certainly not going to put them on and look directly at the beam. So how would I know what the OD rating is? I know, I know - it SHOULD be printed on the glasses. But if it's not how can it be determined?
 

Snecho

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OK - I get that. In my case with the UVEX glasses I have, if absolutely no light passes through them what would the OD rating be? I'm certainly not going to put them on and look directly at the beam. So how would I know what the OD rating is? I know, I know - it SHOULD be printed on the glasses. But if it's not how can it be determined?
Measured by an LPM testing the beam through the glasses. See Styro's video that you linked to see.
 
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