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Nikon D3400

Ears and Eggs

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Anyone here have this camera? Generally happy with it?


Have been looking at getting an entry level DSLR for a some time and while I have no preference between Canon and Nikon, the D3400 seems to be the most common at the top of recommendation lists for the latest models.
 



RB astro

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I'm a Canon man so can't help except to say, you can't go wrong with Nikon.
They have very nice sensors now.
I stay with Canon because of my lenses.
When you make a choice for DSLR maker, consider what lenses you'd like to use with the DSLR and choose accordingly.

:)
 
D

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I'm a Sony Mirroless Guy So I'm no help Either But this camera IS really good if you want compact.
https://www.sony.com/electronics/interchangeable-lens-cameras/ilce-6000-body-kit
I have the a6300 Myself but its probably out of your price range.
I have to say I love the idea of an electronic Viewfinder for beginners as its nice to see your exposure before you shoot. Mirror less lenses are pretty cheap as well And tons of third part option are available.
 
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brucemir

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Hey Ears and Eggs,
I have been using the Nikon D5200 for three years now and have had no issues with it. I use it for my laser photography and normal photography. The 3400 is the model below mine, it 2 or 3 generations newer. I would not hesitate to buy a Nikon again.
 

Alien Laser

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I have the Nikon D7200 DSLR with 3 lenses brand new still packed ,because i use the Nikon Coolpix B700 it takes nice pictures
the are very good cameras, i took me B700 this summer all over Europe and the pictures are very nice in detail :)
 
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paul1598419

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I'm a Canon man too. I've heard nothing but good things about Nikon's cameras, so I think you have done well.
 

dYankee

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You can't go wrong with Nikon. A buddy of mine use them for his hobby turned into a professional wedding photographer.
 

Alaskan

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I bought the Nikon D7200 for my wife, I don't have anything but my cell phone but I'm waiting for the Nikon P1000 to come out.
 

Raybo

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I have been a Pentax kinda guy since the film days (K1000), I have since bought the K100D Super, K20D and K-5, the only camera I have left is the K-5 along with "several" lenses.
I got so caught up in imaging (as I do with all my hobbies) that I had to have some nice lenses, and boy do I have lenses (along with some other gadgets), and now all this stuff is just sitting in the back of my closet.
I'll try to get some images to post.
 

Benm

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I guess if you getting into the DSLR market for the first time you should look mostly at what lenses you are planning on using, and how much they would cost plus the body.

Most photography enthusiasts spend a lot more on lenses, filters and such than on the main camera body. Most people I know that are into photography (also professionally) are using canon equipment, but that might just be because they started there, and could replace their entire set for an equally performing nikon set if it weren't for all the compatible stuff they already have.

The thing is that you can take most snapshots on any system, you only need a dslr and potentially expensive lens to take the difficult shots: things like zoom, fast motion, low light, control over depth of field and such.


I'd first make a list of situations you want/need to photograph with an SLR but you cannot using a compact camera. This might be a surprisingly short list.

Personally this is the reason i've not bought into this market in the first place: over 95% of shots i want to take i can with a good quality compact. If i switched to a bulky dslr system i could do much more, but it'd be so big i would mostly not take it with me and miss more opportunities that i'd gain by getting the dslr.

Dollar for dollar, you should probably wonder what shots you could take with a cheap-ish dslr system compared to a (very) high end compact like a sony RX100-IV or -V. These are still very expensive for compact camera's, but you'd be hard pressed to find many situations where you cannot take the shot with one of those but you could with a dslr... apart for extreme dark conditions (or extremely narrow field of depth) or very wide angle photo's.

For the latter case taking a few shots and stitching them after is pretty realistic though.
 

Raybo

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I guess if you getting into the DSLR market for the first time you should look mostly at what lenses you are planning on using, and how much they would cost plus the body.

Most photography enthusiasts spend a lot more on lenses, filters and such than on the main camera body. Most people I know that are into photography (also professionally) are using canon equipment, but that might just be because they started there, and could replace their entire set for an equally performing nikon set if it weren't for all the compatible stuff they already have.

The thing is that you can take most snapshots on any system, you only need a dslr and potentially expensive lens to take the difficult shots: things like zoom, fast motion, low light, control over depth of field and such.


I'd first make a list of situations you want/need to photograph with an SLR but you cannot using a compact camera. This might be a surprisingly short list.

Personally this is the reason i've not bought into this market in the first place: over 95% of shots i want to take i can with a good quality compact. If i switched to a bulky dslr system i could do much more, but it'd be so big i would mostly not take it with me and miss more opportunities that i'd gain by getting the dslr.

Dollar for dollar, you should probably wonder what shots you could take with a cheap-ish dslr system compared to a (very) high end compact like a sony RX100-IV or -V. These are still very expensive for compact camera's, but you'd be hard pressed to find many situations where you cannot take the shot with one of those but you could with a dslr... apart for extreme dark conditions (or extremely narrow field of depth) or very wide angle photo's.

For the latter case taking a few shots and stitching them after is pretty realistic though.
/\
This is why I have thousands of dollars of equipment gathering dust in the back of my closet.
 

Raybo

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Camera bodies are "disposable", lenses on the other hand are for the imaging nerds.
 

Benm

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I bet you're not the only one :)

You often have to choose to take a camera or not at the start of a day, but sometimes interesting things happen unexpectedly. You probably would not walk around with a backpack with a dslr, bunch of lenses, filters etc just in case something randomly presents itself. You probably would if you go to see something specifc like a touristic site.

I take my compact (usually canon s120) when i expect something interesting: that does make significantly better pictures compared to the camera in my phone, but is still about the size of a pack of smokes.

And that's from someone that likes to take "good" photographs, for generic snapshots a smartphone camera is often good enough. They could even be better with some software improvements like manual control over shutter/iso speed, color balance and such.

Higher end phones do have such things though, so just getting a more expensive phone for the camera could be a solution, albeit a very expensive one: the camera on a $1000 phone usually is no match for a $250 compact if conditions are not ideal.
 




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