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Let's talk about White laser (RGB laser module)

tommy

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Hey guys,

Tommy here from LPS.

we have discussed a lot about green, blue, red laser, only few mentioned the RGB laser. I've got one here, with the pictures below:









Check more details from here, but it's not the point of this thread.

so let's talk some about the RGB laser.

the default laser color is white laser as you can see, but it has the ability to present 7 colors, with TTL control. the problem is, how to get a small/simple TTL controller? i go over the market and can't find one, any one have info on that? i know it's used on stage light, and that will have a ttl controller, but how about a single ttl controller board? just simply control the color that we want.

the device should have wider usage, does anyone have more idea on how to use it?
 
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tommy

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thanks Alaskan, the module has already had a TTL driver, but it needs to input some signal. but how to?
 

Alaskan

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+5 VDC on the TTL input. Some turn off with voltage present. I'd ask the seller to provide the info, if they can't find another seller who sells it and ask.
 

Encap

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TTL modulation means you can switch the device (laser) on & off by applying either 5V or 0V to an input pin (actually everything above 2.0V is "on", everything below 0.8V is "off", the range in between is "forbidden" and should only be applied for nanoseconds while going from one logic value to the other). This is opposed to "analog modulation" where the output intensity would be proportional to the voltage applied to the modulation pin.

A RGB can only do a simple mix of R on or off B on or off and G on or off--as in what 3 on/off would accomplish. So output can only be full power ---RGB, R with G , R with B, G with Blue, R, G, or B.
TTL can be pulsed on and off -- the speed of the turn on/off cycle is usually at least 20 KHz in most of the professional units can reach easily 35/40 KHz, and in telecommunication modules you can drive them at MHz range. Alot of the laser modules(especially the cheaper ones) won't handle fast switching . You should find a laser module with a TTL input which can handle the frequencies that you need.

RGB with TTL= seven colors
RGB with analog >thousands of colors

"TTL stands for “Transistor-Transistor Logic,” and is another way to say that the laser diode modulates digitally, and it’s always either 100% on or 100% off, never anywhere in the middle. TTL laser diodes are generally cheaper, and in some situations can appear brighter than a system of analog-modulated laser diodes with the same peak power level. TTL laser diodes are usually used in lower-cost, entry-level systems where maximum brightness is required at all times and you don’t need a wide color palette. An RGB laser projector system with TTL modulation can only make 7 color combinations; red, green, blue, yellow, cyan, magenta and white.
Analog modulation means that the laser diodes can do more than just turn to 100% on or 100% off, and can emit laser at a large range of power levels. Analog-modulating diodes are the industry standard for galvanometer-based projectors, and while costing a little more than TTL diodes, analog diodes offer a much wider color palette than TTL systems. Analog modulation also allows you to fade the laser beams in and out, which gives you a lot more creative control for your show programming. Analog systems can create anywhere from dozens to thousands of possible colors, depending on the specifications of the system.
A laser is said to be “seven-color,” its diodes are TTL, and analog diodes usually go with lasers said to have “1,000+ colors.” For example, our Caliente Aurora’s diodes are TTL, and our Skywriter HPX has analog diodes."
From : What?s the difference between TTL and analog laser color control? | X-Laser®

Here is the O-like 500mW version $115 see: 500mW RGB white laser module/laser light module/TTL modulation [OL-RGB-400] - $115.00 : Zen Cart!, The Art of E-commerce

+5 VDC on the TTL input. Some turn off with voltage present. I'd ask the seller to provide the info, if they can't find another seller who sells it and ask.
Agree ask the seller or get a new seller.

Nobody is going to bother much with cheap low end quality RGB modules with so-so or poor alignment except as a curiosity/novelty product.

Minimum pretty good/decent quality RGB module is an OPT Lasers, 400mW mini module at $399
see: https://optlasers.com/en/28-rgb-modules
 
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ArcticDude

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Yes, Encap has a good point. I got both RGB's or pretty much similar 400mw cheap RGB and alignment on cheaper one is horrible. Dichros / holders are glued with epoxy. It's very difficult to correct alignment.
Beam alignment is quite unusable after 5-10 meters.

Definitely recommend to go after Optlaser unit.

----
EDIT
Btw.. On my cheap RGB driver, shorting each channel pins will turn channel off and +5V signal does nothing.
 
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tommy

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thanks so much for all the information, voltage is the signal. and Encap is correct, i add a 3.7v to the pin and successfully change the color. it's so funny to change the color and it's a good toy to play with:beer:
 

diachi

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Encap, don't forget about PWM. With PWM you can still get lots of colours if you've only got TTL input. Not really good for an RGB scanner, but it'd work OK for a handheld, although you'd notice the pulses if you moved it around quickly. Could create some interesting effects on its own.
 

10fenny

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I'm butting together a cheap rgb projector right now off of other parts I have. I took an rgb module out of this ghetto e Bay projector.. it had steppers instead of galvos. The problem with that rgb module was the alignment.. I had to shim the mounts with paper to get more y adjustment.. also the drivers were integrated into the main board.. so far I got red and blue running with some ttl aixiz drivers.
Also these rgb module are great for making lumia! My coworker wants to build one now
 

Encap

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Encap, don't forget about PWM. With PWM you can still get lots of colours if you've only got TTL input. Not really good for an RGB scanner, but it'd work OK for a handheld, although you'd notice the pulses if you moved it around quickly. Could create some interesting effects on its own.
Yes, if pulsed --that is why I mentioned TTL can be pulsed.
With PMT you can create the illusion of other wavelengths just as it creates the illusion of "white" light and wavelengths other than R,G, and B.
All it can actually emit of course is R,G, and B.
The keys to a good RGB unit is beam quality and alignment of the 3 beams.
Ideal is perfect alignment of the RGB beams---from there it goes downhill.
 
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ArcticDude

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do we have a standard for a good alignment?
Well, if the RGB beam is after 100-200 meters one "dot" it's good. If you got 3 separate dots, it's not so well aligned. Here's Optlaser unit.

Click for HI-RES image

 

lasersbee

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Well, if the RGB beam is after 100-200 meters one "dot" it's good. If you got 3 separate dots, it's not so well aligned. Here's Optlaser unit.

Click for HI-RES image

\

Man... That is a nice Pic.... :cool:

If Tommy's White Laser RGB TTL controlled unit is
optically aligned properly I can see a Microcontroller
based PWM on the TTL inputs if the PWM resolution
is high enough and at a high frequency...

Jerry
 




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