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I need help repairing this red laser pointer

99RADS

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So a while back I bought a laser pointer off Ali express which is an import website for products from China. It was a red laser pointer that was able to burn and used one 18650 battery. So because this was one of my first burning lasers I was dumb and did dumb things with it. The point is I pointed it at itself in the mirror and it broke in a way that I think broke the diode inside so now it is significantly weaker than when I bought it. If anyone can help by giving me instructions on how to repair it that would be nice. I don't remember the name of the laser pointer but here are a few pictures to help identify what type it is.Photo on 10-14-18 at 3.39 PM #2.jpgPhoto on 10-14-18 at 3.39 PM #3.jpgPhoto on 10-14-18 at 3.39 PM.jpg
 



steve001

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So a while back I bought a laser pointer off Ali express which is an import website for products from China. It was a red laser pointer that was able to burn and used one 18650 battery. So because this was one of my first burning lasers I was dumb and did dumb things with it. The point is I pointed it at itself in the mirror and it broke in a way that I think broke the diode inside so now it is significantly weaker than when I bought it. If anyone can help by giving me instructions on how to repair it that would be nice. I don't remember the name of the laser pointer but here are a few pictures to help identify what type it is.View attachment 61878View attachment 61879View attachment 61880
Your question implies you do not have the skills to repair it. The easiest way to fix it would be to buy a new one.
 

Benm

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It's quite possible that a back reflection damaged the laser diode indeed.

If it's worth an effort to repair it is dubious - i'm not sure what you paid for this laser pointer, but it looks like a fairly generic model that would not cost over $25 or so.

It mostly depends on your experience with electronics - if you're good at soldering etc it could be worth fixing, but if you're not chances are you may find it impossible to replace.

'Burning' isn't that much of a definition of power level, but you can still measure the current draw in its current condition to get some idea of what replacement diode would be required. Obviously you would also have to open the laser to see what form factor of diode is actually in there, though i presume it's a 5.6 mm diameter model intended for a dvd writer. Those things cost very little, a couple of dollars each from ebay, so if you have the skills to replace it, go ahead and try :)
 

hakzaw1

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I would say welcome to the forums BUT you failed to intro yourself (in the welcome section ) --
(where we send greets)
it would be respectful if you would still make an intro- also we often can be more helpful if you had added your present location into your profile. this 'style' of laser is not really worth fixing.. a new one would cost you $3 .. AND now for $3 you can buy 3 lasers. 3 wavelenghts..
and also disposible.. A hand built laser is the best for repairing--

___________from steve..''Your question implies you do not have the skills to repair it. The easiest way to fix it would be to buy a new one ""

while you may not like what has been said--we are only being honest..
Knowing your limitations is the key here... buy & build a kit laser -learn how to fix.. and that will make you happy.

hope to read your introduction thread soon..
 

99RADS

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I would say welcome to the forums BUT you failed to intro yourself (in the welcome section ) --
(where we send greets)
it would be respectful if you would still make an intro- also we often can be more helpful if you had added your present location into your profile. this 'style' of laser is not really worth fixing.. a new one would cost you $3 .. AND now for $3 you can buy 3 lasers. 3 wavelenghts..
and also disposible.. A hand built laser is the best for repairing--

___________from steve..''Your question implies you do not have the skills to repair it. The easiest way to fix it would be to buy a new one ""

while you may not like what has been said--we are only being honest..
Knowing your limitations is the key here... buy & build a kit laser -learn how to fix.. and that will make you happy.

hope to read your introduction thread soon..
Kinda short on time. I’m a busy student.
 

99RADS

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It's quite possible that a back reflection damaged the laser diode indeed.

If it's worth an effort to repair it is dubious - i'm not sure what you paid for this laser pointer, but it looks like a fairly generic model that would not cost over $25 or so.

It mostly depends on your experience with electronics - if you're good at soldering etc it could be worth fixing, but if you're not chances are you may find it impossible to replace.

'Burning' isn't that much of a definition of power level, but you can still measure the current draw in its current condition to get some idea of what replacement diode would be required. Obviously you would also have to open the laser to see what form factor of diode is actually in there, though i presume it's a 5.6 mm diameter model intended for a dvd writer. Those things cost very little, a couple of dollars each from ebay, so if you have the skills to replace it, go ahead and try :)
I would like to at least try to repair it but if you could put up a link for one of the same model with a relatively good review for cheap then I’ll go with that
 

99RADS

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Your question implies you do not have the skills to repair it. The easiest way to fix it would be to buy a new one.
Who said I wasn’t able to fix it. I just want to know how I would fix it.
 

Encap

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Who said I wasn’t able to fix it. I just want to know how I would fix it.
Your statement is self explanatory.
You can't even define/say what specifically is wrong with it--could be several things causing what you report.

You have been given the best advice already by LPF members with experience.

There is no review or thread on how to fix all possible things that could be malfunctioning on low level low quality mass produced generic $10 lasers. Is a waste of time, effort, and money to fool with it. Would cost more than several new ones to repair even if you had the equipment, knew what you were doing, + could do a repair.

By another one for $9.99 on ebay here https://www.ebay.com/itm/RX2-Adjustable-Focus-650nm-BURNING-Red-Laser-Pointer-High-Power-Lazer-Torch-Pen/183391268180?var=690701045366&hash=item2ab2f8ad54:m:mjkfaDsftBG4dKnX6fqd9qw

Maybe buy a higher quality laser see: https://www.jetlasers.org/ and https://www.sanwulasers.com/
 
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Cyparagon

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I just want to know how I would fix it.
A laser diode replacement is in order. This part will be something like $10, will take a few hours, and likely result in a scratched up case. For all that trouble, it's stupid not to buy a new one instead... unless of course you're just looking to tinker or hone your acumen.


This isn't even about skill. It's about economic viability. We don't repair light bulbs when they fail (even though it is possible) for all the same reasons.
 

Benm

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Well yeah, you could replace a filament in a broken light bulb, but that'd be very difficult to to in both getting the replacement material as well as the required equipment, skill required, and very low cost of replacement.

With this laser pointer it's not that different, except you will not need very expensive repair parts or equipment to perform the repair - a few bucks for a replacement diode and a soldering iron is all it would take in terms of actual cost. It'll also take a considerable amount of time to do this, but i don't count that as a loss since it's a learning experience especially the first few times.

Also there is the part that doesn't cost you any money and could be a good way to spend your time: Try to open the defective unit to the point where you could actually replace the diode if you had a replacement, soldering station and perhaps any pressing gear to seat that replacement diode.

If you just go for the reversible-disassembly part you can learn a lot without spending a dime. You may still arrive at the conclusion that buying a replacement unit is the better option, but at least you know why at that point.

This is a general thing with electrical items that fail: Often it's actually preferable to buy a replacement instead of repairing it, but at least exploring the problem can be worthwhile. Your luck on doing so may vary a lot, but sometimes it does pay off. Even with things as finicky as laptops you sometimes find a repairable fault, or get something useful out of taking it apart like a harddrive that's on the brink of failure but will last just long enough to recover data from it (and yeah, you should have backups, always, but somehow people rarely do).
 

paul1598419

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Thanks for the link, Encap. For $9.99 I went ahead and bought one myself. Don't really need it, but the price was too good to turn it down. I have 650nm single mode lasers I have built myself that are very likely more powerful than this one, 385 mW, but for that price I can always give it as a gift if I don't like it.
 

hakzaw1

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TBH almost all here [for old timers or new members] had a laser die in our hands and wanted to repair it..
If it has not happened to you... give it time..dying lasers 'comes with the territory'.
You could always try to use it as a host (IMO not exactly the same)..if you can get it opened up..then any module (laser w/ driver) you can find that fits AND runs off same batteries or get more or less power by using a different battery(s).


There is a long list of voltages one can 'create'.. too skinny? a 'sleeve; makes the fit right and eliminates any 'rattles'.
For 'aa' and 'aaa' there is the same size in Li-Ion but 3.5 to 4.0VDC instead of 1vdc , 1.25 vdc or 1.5 vdc(< the most common 'primary') if too much power than you dare use, a dummy batteries can be added-- additional 'battery extensions' like those that come with many Jetlasers lasers allow another battery

AND shorter li- ions are available to double your vdc w/o another battery tube.
A Pro Pl-E with extra batt tube AND the 10X JL BE attached is one big ass laser.. too long to fit in most holsters (like the camo JL)
I am confident that no other 'commercially made' laser and BE is longer (~13 inches).. or heavier (especially with the sleeves removed and two 26650s are used.. No huge power increase but longer time before charge.

first time in a 'Battery Hound' store I was amazed how many sizes existed that I had never heard of.. our store (n Pearland) closed down
sad but understandable- two or three 'workers' and never more than one or two buyers at the same time and many times I was the only one there.
btw they were amazed at my laser made from a LED flashlight..they do not sell any lasers..(but inUSA--who does?)
 

Benm

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I think these laser diodes will become less easy to source over time though, as their purpose is for making fast DVD writers, and that medium is losing market share quickly.

For their price they have some pretty good properties though: very reliable if driven with a good driver and reasonable current, single mode, and a fair bit of raw power too - not the kind that sets everything on fire, but you can light a match or something with these diodes.

The only real downside of them is the wavelength: 'boring old red', and not very visible red per mW either at 650-660 nm compared to 638/635. For more scientific experiments they are great though as they are single mode diodes that are both visible and output a decent amount of power... and yeah, you'll need eye protection. They may not even appear that bright but 200+ mW of 660 nm light will still blind you before you could blink.
 




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