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How is one supposed to use safety goggles?

fedcas

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Hello,
Of course I have read the sticky threads several times and I have been using low powered (2xAAA) laser pointers for years quite responsibly (I mean focusing on these kind of issues https://laserpointerforums.com/f75/laser-safety-checklist-aware-your-environment-97407.html ) even though without using googles.
Now I have a 303 laser on the way which is probably in the 50-100 mW range so I was considering safety goggles.

But... ok, it may seem like a weird question, but now I think of it I have really no idea how they are supposed to be used :s I mean, with medium power laser and average OD glasses, the dot and even more so the beam will not be visible... so what do you use a laser for when you are wearing glasses? I guess it's kind of having an IR laser pointer instead of one in the visible spectrum...
 
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Encap

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"I have really no idea how they are supposed to be used" .
Really?? Take a wild guess. :crackup::rolleyes:
 
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deadshadow

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personally im using my goggles when im testing-building a laser and trying some powerups mostly,sometimes if i want to burn something at low distance as with reflections you can't even see anything and sometimes to check the beam-dot profile at a x distance clearly.when im using my lasers normally im always alone in my room without any reflective items as mirrors crystals and sometimes late night outside for beamshots at night sky so im not using my goggles on those cases as i want to see the nice photons while being extra careful ;)
 
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Bacon

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I would say goggles are for indoor use mostly. Its usually safe to point into something like a black blanket if you just want to admire the beam for a bit (assuming it wont burn it). Goggles are a must if you are going to etch/burn something.
Usually use them for the high powered lasers when etching my initials into something or zapping critters in the aquarium. Also very useful when focusing the beam; you cant see how tight the dot is without goggles, or causing damage to your eyes close up.

I was paranoid about my eye safety so I buy mine from NoIR/oemlaser systems. If you want something cheaper; people here recommenced survival lasers "eagle pair".
 
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Merpie101

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you put them over your eyes. if what youre asking is if you can see any indication of a laser, yea you should be able to see a faint spot but usually only fluorescence and not the color of the laser itself.
 

Alaskan

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If the beam is powerful enough and the OD of the glasses are not too high, you need them to see what the spot looks like to make adjustments to lenses etc. They are primarily meant to protect your eyes when working with lasers, making adjustments to the laser itself, equipment or performing tasks with lasers. If using a laser to burn, you want them to be the right OD as not to completely block all of the light, but enough to protect you from reflections or accidents.
 

RedCowboy

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Yea, what Alaskan was saying, the cheap ebay dark amber glasses block a lot of all light, but a decent pair can give you OD5 or OD6 protection with 50% visible light transmission.

Also if you are burning up close ( desktop ) and want to see what it looks like then record it and watch it on your laptop/PC monitor, but you must protect your eyes with the correct safety glasses that attenuate the wavelength you are working with.

Here's the good quality at the good price glasses many of us use, for 445-470nm blue lasers I like the orange glasses better than the amber, but read the specs and get what you need to protect your eyes.

https://www.survivallaserusa.com/Safety_Goggles/cat1667093_1527285.aspx
 

Encap

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Yea, what Alaskan was saying, the cheap ebay dark amber glasses block a lot of all light, but a decent pair can give you OD5 or OD6 protection with 50% visible light transmission.

Also if you are burning up close ( desktop ) and want to see what it looks like then record it and watch it on your laptop/PC monitor, but you must protect your eyes with the correct safety glasses that attenuate the wavelength you are working with.

Here's the good quality at the good price glasses many of us use, for 445-470nm blue lasers I like the orange glasses better than the amber, but read the specs and get what you need to protect your eyes.

https://www.survivallaserusa.com/Safety_Goggles/cat1667093_1527285.aspx
Exactly what he said ^^^

For anyone to suggest or advise that you not use proper protective eye wear/laser glasses/goggles at all times is reckless and irresponsible and leaving you open to accidental ocular damage.

If you decide you don't want to wear them or want to peak out from behind them in some circumstances that is up to you alone--the decision and risks are 100% yours and your doing.

see: " Hit in eye with 1000mw 445nm blue laser" https://laserpointerforums.com/f53/hit-eye-1000mw-445nm-blue-laser-69469.html

Here is a good laser eye hazard chart: http://www.lasersafetyfacts.com/resources/FAA---visible-laser-hazard-calcs-for-LSF-v02.png
 
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fedcas

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if what youre asking is if you can see any indication of a laser, yea you should be able to see a faint spot but usually only fluorescence and not the color of the laser itself.
If the beam is powerful enough and the OD of the glasses are not too high [...] If using a laser to burn, you want them to be the right OD as not to completely block all of the light, but enough to protect you from reflections or accidents.
AH! Now I get it... that's the point I was missing! :p I was making the wrong assumption that the remaining light was so low to be completely invisible... also the fluorescence part is interesting, do you mean the dot you see has a different color?



check the beam-dot profile
etching my initials into something or zapping critters in the aquarium. Also very useful when focusing the beam; you cant see how tight the dot is without goggles, or causing damage to your eyes close up.
now it makes sense! ;)


Also if you are burning up close ( desktop ) and want to see what it looks like then record it and watch it on your laptop/PC monitor, but you must protect your eyes with the correct safety glasses that attenuate the wavelength you are working with.
didn't think about it, good to know ;)


I had already read the first thread, but missed the chart... interesting, I have saved it in my documents ;)



thank you all guys! ;)
 
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Alaskan

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AH! Now I get it... that's the point I was missing! I was making the wrong assumption that the remaining light was so low to be completely invisible... also the fluorescence part is interesting, do you mean the dot you see has a different color?
The spot always looks a different color to me when viewed through my goggles, I assume when 532 nm green looks yellow, it is indeed florescence within the material the glasses are made from. I bet there are goggles which show a much dimmer green, but I don't have any which do that, does anyone?
 
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RedCowboy

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I used to get a really bright orange spot when burning with a blue laser desktop and wearing my orange glasses, so I put a blue pair that block red under them and that dimmed it and everything way down, I needed some less dark blue glasses, a lower OD of red blocking, I also have OD6 orange glasses that help some, but a low level of red blocking would likely help dim the by product and still let us see what we are doing.
 
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Radim

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As guys said. The 532 nm looks yellow to orange. With my high OD goggles even Opto Beast looks like tiny orange dotie. No glare, no green, just fluorescent light. Without goggles it would blind you instantly...
 

Benm

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I think it's a really valid question.

Personally i use safety goggles whenever experimenting with lasers, like lining up beam combiners, setting up beams for experiments and such.

Once the laser is securely mounted and i know where all the light goes, observing it without the goggles is quite safe.

One situation to use them is also when you are shining them around, potentially hitting something that is reflective sending the beam back into your eyes unintentionally. Normal house windows are pretty good reflectors and will, depending on angle, reflect about 4% back into your eyes when hit straight on, and far more than that when hit at a shallow angle.

Burning things up close is also a very good reason to use them, especially when you are trying to cut through things like plastic that melt and then suddenly become quite reflective.

Another thing could be when you have a sitation that's safe as such, with a laser stably mounted shining onto a non-glossy surface, but you want to adjust the focus or other beam correcting optics: in that case they are not so much for safety but just to dim the dot down to a point where you can comfortable look at it, and make out more detail because you're not being overwhelmed with light - that while safe can still be impractically bright to look at.
 




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