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How do I change the lens on this 1W laser?

Encap

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The laser arrived yesterday. The laser beam is bright but I'd like it to be brighter if possible. I want the beam to be seen from a few kilometers. So I assume getting the single element M9*0.5 lens would make it more visible. I measured the copper lens holder or how it's called and it measures 9mm in diameter. The actual lens measures 5mm in diameter. So I guess this lens I want to buy would fit https://www.ebay.com/itm/405nm-445nm-488nm-515nm-520nm-Laser-Lens-MP9x9mm-Laser-Collimation-Glass-lens-x1/261445531997?_trkparms=aid=555018&algo=PL.SIM&ao=2&asc=20180306143914&meid=4a2a4a17d0f54db5bf717144ab62cbbf&pid=100935&rk=1&rkt=12&mehot=pp&sd=262228356312&itm=261445531997&_trksid=p2056116.c100935.m2460 If I got the new lens do I push out the old copper one forcibly with a stick or something and slide in the new one? Would getting the lens be worth it? Or is it just a waste of 7 dollars?

You are not going to visually notice the slight increase in output by changing the lens. You would notice it on a Laser Power Meter.
It is what it is.

Output power does not directly translate into visual brightness. It takes 4X the output power to double the the visual brightness so a 4W blue laser would be 2X as bright as the one you have.
 

paul1598419

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You are not going to visually notice the slight increase in output by changing the lens. You would notice it on a Laser Power Meter.
It is what it is.

Output power does not directly translate into visual brightness. It takes 4X the output power to double the the visual brightness so a 4W blue laser would be 2X as bright as the one you have.
This is true because our vision is not linear with regard to optical power. You might see as much as 25% more power on a laser power meter, but that would only translate into a better ability to engrave or burn. I use these lenses because you get a greater power density too. But, I have many lenses in my stock that I have collected over the years.
 

steve001

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This is true because our vision is not linear with regard to optical power. You might see as much as 25% more power on a laser power meter, but that would only translate into a better ability to engrave or burn. I use these lenses because you get a greater power density too. But, I have many lenses in my stock that I have collected over the years.
The terminated beam at great distance would have greater visibility. Up close no difference.
 

paul1598419

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The terminated beam at great distance would have greater visibility. Up close no difference.
Sorry, I don't get your point. If you want a terminated beam at great distances to have greater visibility, one would use a BE to cut down on the divergence that occurs with MM diodes. My point was that short focal length aspheric lenses will produce more power over multi element lenses. But, it won't be something you can see as the 25% is not enough to increase the visibility of the beam or its profile.
 

steve001

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Sorry, I don't get your point. If you want a terminated beam at great distances to have greater visibility, one would use a BE to cut down on the divergence that occurs with MM diodes. My point was that short focal length aspheric lenses will produce more power over multi element lenses. But, it won't be something you can see as the 25% is not enough to increase the visibility of the beam or its profile.
At close range vision response is saturated. Any small increase may not be noticeable. At distance it is not so that 25% increase is noticeable
 

paul1598419

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I would think that the amount of power would dictate whether or not your vision was saturated. The beam profile of a 50 mW laser at say, 20 feet wouldn't necessarily saturate one's vision. To be able to notice the change in power would still require more than a 25% increase in power. You could take it down to 5 mW and it would still require more than 25% increase in power to see a difference.
 




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