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gonna try a 375nm pointer build...

diachi

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10mW @ 375nm
Nice, you got it in a host! :beer:

Fluoresces good, eh?
 

styropyro

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Oh it fluoresces VERY good. Even when not exciting some material, the visibility is higher than I expected.

I'm using a micro boost drive here, so I had to wrap the Aixiz module in electrical tape to insulate it from the casing. I do fear a connection will form between the case and module somehow.
 

Zom-B

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Does it fluoresce clean air? I.e. can you produce shallow-angle beamshots?
 

Atomicrox

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Fantastic!
What does it look like on a low fluorescence surface? Have you tried looking at the dot with a grating to make sure you're actually seeing the UV line?
 

Merpie101

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from what ive found, idk if this applies to 375nm but even my wall paint, floors, bed, everything fluoresces at 337nm it seems
sadly i had to take my cheap 337 apart so i could return the power supply but it made literally everything fluoresce
if theres a material that exists thats truly anti fluorescent i would like to try getting some
 

diachi

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if theres a material that exists thats truly anti fluorescent i would like to try getting some

Vantablack! :beer:

Although you'd be hard pressed to get your hands on any of that. I don't imagine it'd be fluorescent at all though.

That said, I found several materials that weren't fluorescent with either of my 325nm HeCd lasers.
 

Zom-B

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Try Orca film. It's supposed to have an as high as possible reflection in the optical spectrum without fluorescence. It looks less bright than paper, because, paper fluoresces.
 

styropyro

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Finished the video, at over 9 minutes it is probably my longest vid yet.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ONp_McwJS0

Sorry for the clickbaity title, but on today's YT market you gotta drive interest somehow... :rolleyes:




Fantastic!
What does it look like on a low fluorescence surface? Have you tried looking at the dot with a grating to make sure you're actually seeing the UV line?
It looks almost gray actually, with a little bit of violet to it. Reminds me a bit of 355nm. I haven't actually put it through a grating yet, but I assume it is the 375nm I'm seeing.
 

Hap

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Finished the video, at over 9 minutes it is probably my longest vid yet.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ONp_McwJS0

Sorry for the clickbaity title, but on today's YT market you gotta drive interest somehow... :rolleyes:





It looks almost gray actually, with a little bit of violet to it. Reminds me a bit of 355nm. I haven't actually put it through a grating yet, but I assume it is the 375nm I'm seeing.
^That's a great video, just finished watching it! Hopefully the market opens up more for affordable UV wavelengths to us hobbyists in the future :)

-Alex
 

Encap

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Finished the video, at over 9 minutes it is probably my longest vid yet.
Sorry for the clickbaity title, but on today's YT market you gotta drive interest somehow... :rolleyes
It looks almost gray actually, with a little bit of violet to it. Reminds me a bit of 355nm. I haven't actually put it through a grating yet, but I assume it is the 375nm I'm seeing.
Nice job and you right has to a the first 375nm pointer ever done

Great video---- you really got that one up and running quickly :beer:

The degree to which is lights up the fluorescent material is something different---very bright activated phosphors
 

Razako

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Very nice, always cool to see Styro push the boundaries of the laser hobby.
 

Atomicrox

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Great video!

That effect with red "erasing" phosphorescence is even stronger with IR.
I don't think it's a thermal effect, it seems like the longer-WL somehow releases all the stored energy. If you do it with an IR laser and pay close attention you'll see the phosphorescent emission shines very brightly before it's put out.
 

ZRaffleticket

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The cool thing is that it doesn't erase the glow on all materials. I don't quite understand it...

Gotta say I'm jealous of this. If you ever find yourself with a second one of these you don't need, you know where to find me ;)
 
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Cyparagon

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Is 375nm long enough of a wavelength not to cause any health concerns to us?
UVA "ages skin", supposedly, but is otherwise mostly harmless.

Besides, your dose from background sources would be several orders of magnitude higher than activity from screwing around with a pointer. Fluorescent lamps (especially black lights), HID lamps, halogen lamps, and sunlight all have a non-trivial amount of UVA.

if theres a material that exists thats truly anti fluorescent i would like to try getting some
Have you heard of... metal? :can:

You're saying a coating of happy glowing yellow on everything is a bad thing?? :D
Not bad, just... kinky. R-kelly would approve.
 

styropyro

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I've done a little more reading about the effect where the red laser kills the glow from the GITD surface. Wikipedia's article on phosphorescence gives enough background for this. Basically when a phosphorescent material is excited, instead of dropping down to the ground state quickly like seen in fluorescence, the electron in the excited state undergoes an intersystem crossing to a state of lower energy but higher spin multiplicity. The electron becomes trapped here because the transition between this triplet state and the ground state is actually forbidden by quantum mechanical selection rules, and it takes perturbations from the surroundings to change the geometry of the molecule enough to make the probability of this transition nonzero. But when we hit it with the red laser (which does not have the energy to excite the GITD material on its own) it excites electrons trapped in the triplet state, which then have enough energy to make an intersystem crossing back to the singlet state, and from there it can emit nearly immediately by fluorescence and fall back down to the ground state.

I think. I should be more comfortable with this stuff considering I'm trained as a physical chemist... :eek:


Not bad, just... kinky. R-kelly would approve.
HAHAHAHAHAHAHA
 




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