Welcome to Laser Pointer Forums - discuss green laser pointers, blue laser pointers, and all types of lasers



Driving a pre-made module from DTR's Laser shop?

Who_What?

New member
Joined
Oct 19, 2020
Messages
3
Points
1
Okay, firstly I want to say, awesome seller. However I don't want to bug someone who must be very busy. So I purchased 488nm SHARP corp. Laser diode module (Driver included, I believe that it's a Flex Drive, although I'm unsure...), I purchased it in this format main because I don't trust myself yet with direct handling of the diode yet. Now, I have a diode and a heat sink to put it in, but I would like to know how I should power it as to reduce the risk of transient currents possibly damaging the diode? Are normal batteries in series sufficient to meet the Below 6VDC that the Driver requires (Although I read the Datasheet that sharp produced for it, and it requires 6-7VDC?), or should I use a AC-DC PC power supply? Thanks!
 



hakzaw1

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 2, 2009
Messages
10,461
Points
113
be sure to protect everything from Static--(& short all caps when they are used)
 

icecruncher

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 2, 2008
Messages
1,405
Points
83
Okay, firstly I want to say, awesome seller. However I don't want to bug someone who must be very busy. So I purchased 488nm SHARP corp. Laser diode module (Driver included, I believe that it's a Flex Drive, although I'm unsure...), I purchased it in this format main because I don't trust myself yet with direct handling of the diode yet. Now, I have a diode and a heat sink to put it in, but I would like to know how I should power it as to reduce the risk of transient currents possibly damaging the diode?
If this is the one you have:


DTRs' website, tells you; you drive it with 2.5-6.0v and something that will handle over 1A current. Read the heading for the one you bought.

Which means any SINGLE decent quality 18650 or even smaller batteries should be able to drive it without a problem.

Each 18650 is 3.7v and most will handle dropping much more than an amp without issue. Under load they will usually put out 3.5 - 4.0v. Cheap and older 18650 batteries may drop to as much as 2.5v, so stick with a good quality battery. Stay away from Ultrafire and Trustfire.

Two 18650s would result in too much voltage (3.7 x 2 = 7.4v) depending on the driver used it will either be converted to heat, which you don't want, or cause issues with the driver, which you also don't want.

Here is a good site for looking up batteries.

 

Who_What?

New member
Joined
Oct 19, 2020
Messages
3
Points
1
If this is the one you have:


DTRs' website, tells you; you drive it with 2.5-6.0v and something that will handle over 1A current. Read the heading for the one you bought.

Which means any SINGLE decent quality 18650 or even smaller batteries should be able to drive it without a problem.

Each 18650 is 3.7v and most will handle dropping much more than an amp without issue. Under load they will usually put out 3.5 - 4.0v. Cheap and older 18650 batteries may drop to as much as 2.5v, so stick with a good quality battery. Stay away from Ultrafire and Trustfire.

Two 18650s would result in too much voltage (3.7 x 2 = 7.4v) depending on the driver used it will either be converted to heat, which you don't want, or cause issues with the driver, which you also don't want.

Here is a good site for looking up batteries.

Thanks for the Info, was unsure if the drivers specs superceeded what DTR suggested. I just got all the rest of the parts so I will upload some pictures when its up and running!
 




Top