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Do you type dvorak?

Do you type dvorak?

  • No

    Votes: 27 58.7%
  • Yes

    Votes: 6 13.0%
  • What?

    Votes: 13 28.3%

  • Total voters
    46

pullbangdead

Well-known member
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Aug 25, 2007
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god why am I not suprised that a MAC would come out with a keyboard ya couldn't freakin type on until you learned how to type in Dvorak.. STUPID. No more stupid than the I-pod craze.
Ummm, that's not what it is. The Dvorak layout has existed since well before computers existed. The user probably just rearranged the keys. Dvorak is built into Windows, and I'm almost positive it's built into macs as well. I have a Dell laptop that I just rearranged all the keys on it to make it Dvorak and did a little regedit to make it Dvorak full time. People try to type on it, then do a double take when they notice the keys are alittle funky. Nobody as school asks to sue my computer to check their e-mail and such, really cuts down on hassle. :yh:

--------------------------------------------

I prefer Dvorak, but I'm one of the people who can type on both about equally well, I didn't really have to give up Qwerty to switch to Dvorak, so it wasn't that hard of a choice for me. Most people can't just go back and forth, but I can switch back and forth between Qwerty and Dvorak with relative ease. I'm a little faster on Dvorak, and I can say without any doubt that Dvorak is more comfortable to type on. My hands are less tense on Dvorak, they get tired MUCH faster on Qwerty, Dvorak is overall just more comfortable to use by a longshot.

If you're a person who uses lab computers or other computers often, I can see how it wouldn't be advantageous to use Dvorak, especially if you're not one of the lucky people who can continue touch-typing on both. And you NEED to be able to stop typing for a while to switch, with nothing important to do for a month or 2 while you switch. But if you always use your own computer and type with any regularity, I can whole-heartedly recommend Dvorak.
 

laser83

Banned
Joined
Feb 6, 2009
Messages
374
Points
0
Not worth the slight extra speed because EVERY other computer will use the normal QWERTY layout. Best to be proficient in normal typing.
 

chipdouglas

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Dec 23, 2008
Messages
4,011
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pulllbangdead is correct. it is built in to windows and macs. all you need to do is re arrange the keys and set your computer to the correct input method. You just need to be sure which dvorak you are using. there are a few different styles and it can be set up for lefties or righties :na:
 

pseudolobster

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Jan 20, 2008
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pulllbangdead is correct. it is built in to windows and macs. all you need to do is re arrange the keys and set your computer to the correct input method. You just need to be sure which dvorak you are using. there are a few different styles and it can be set up for lefties or righties :na:
Yep, it's built into every OS I've ever used. I used it in DOS, I used it in BeOS, I've used it in every flavor of windows from 3.1 to windows 7, every distro of linux... It's very widely supported.

You don't need to rearrange your keys, that only helps for learning... It's much better in the long run to learn blind, by putting a printout of the layout below your monitor, then just touch typing. Besides, most keyboards these days have curved keys, so if you rearrange them the layout is bumpy and awkward. Only on an IBM Model M keyboard (or any keyboard that has a curved backplate rather than curved keys) does it actually work.

As for the different variations, the only one that's ever widely used is "Two Handed American Dvorak"... The left and right hand versions were created for people with disabilities who can only use one hand. The other variations were created for different languages which have different letter frequencies than English.

(edit) actually, now that I think about it, for DOS I actually had to download a .SYS file and add a MODE line to my autoexec.bat to use dvorak, so I'm not sure that counts... (/edit)
 
Last edited:

rocketparrotlet

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Aug 17, 2008
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Why in the world would I want to learn a new layout? I can type well enough on qwerty layout.

-Mark
 

chipdouglas

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 23, 2008
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Points
63
it's no so much about learning a new layout just to do it. you dont even gain type speed. it's ergonomic issue.


ps. don't click the link in rocketparrotlet's signature!!!!!!!
 

nvmextc

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Joined
Jan 24, 2008
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Why would it matter what kind of keyboard you use for typing dvorak? The letter/key assignments are a matter of software, so that should work on any keyboard... obviously you dont get the right key labels, but what would be the point of those if you aim on rapid (blind) typing?
G15 keyboard uses macro's you can predefine, electronically the G15 is a QWERTY and needs the hardware to be flashed as well as having the keys moved around to become dvorak. Otherwise when recording macros you think you are pressing one letter, but it's using the qwerty placement.

I do belive you gain type speed when you become proficient with DVORAK, you're fingers move up to 50% less distance and QWERTY was actually designed to slow us down, back in the day of typewriters QWERTY was brought in to stop jams occuring from letters coming up too quickly together.
 

Jaseth

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Jan 30, 2009
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I only use qwerty as I have to type in 5 different languages, so the keys being arranged for optimum use for English in dvorak would not really justify learning a whole new system. Seems pretty cool though if you mostly type English. I think my WPM is about 70 but I haven't tested it for 2 years.
 




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