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Battery names

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Okay, so, this has been bugging me for a while. Whenever I'm discussing anything electronics-related with my friends, we inevitably come across the topic of batteries, and when asked which type I have in a flashlight or something, I just say the first thing that comes to mind.
But then I wonder: is that REALLY how you pronounce it?

I'm talking about the numbered battery names (i.e. 18650, 10440, etc.). What is the correct, syntactic way of pronouncing their names? I guess a part of my lack of knowledge has to do with what the complete meanings of the digits. I know that the first two digits specify the diameter of the battery (in millimeters) and the second two represent the length, but what is the final "0" for? And are other numbers used in the last digit?

Just to throw this out there, I used to simply say them the way that seemed simplest to me, such as "eighteen six fifty" (18650), but after contemplating about it, I began saying "eighteen sixty-five zero" for a little bit, but that soon started sounding slightly strange, so now I've decided on just "eighteen sixty-five." However, in all honesty, the first version sounded best, even though it seemed "incorrect."

I do realize that it's not really a very vital point as far as the bigger picture goes, but I just wanted to see how fellow laser-builders say it.
 

Shogoki

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it's easier for me and i started calling it "eighteen-six-fifty" at the beginning too.
 
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Last digit (0) means the battery is cylindrical

I also pronounce 18650 "eighteen-six-fifty"
14500 = "fourteen-five-hundred"
10440 = "ten-fourty-four-oh" (that one's almost proper lol)

I'm sure this is rather common, though it is probably more proper to say each set of digits separately.
 

HIMNL9

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Here we mainly use letters codes ..... A, AA, AAA, 3/4A, and so on ..... for define shapes and sizes of different batteries ..... the numerical code is not too much diffused (not talking about "button" batteries, that sometimes have 2 or 3 different designations for the same units, and half of the peoples don't know what the hell are ..... like AG13 / LR44, as example)

But, thinking about that, i noticed that there is always a mess, when someone europhone talk about "batteries" with someone anglophone, also for a different reason.

I mean, anglophones calls anything "battery", both rechargeable, non-rechargeable, and block-based ones, where instead, at least here, we have different names for them.

Batteria (battery), is always a rechargeable battery ..... a non-rechargeable battery (i think you call them prime or primary) is "pila" (pile), when a battery pack (usually referred to single-block types, like car batteries or gel-pack batteries, or notebook batteries), is "accumulatore" (accumulator), and the single elements of accumulators are celle (cells).

Any other with the same different names, other than different codes for shape and sizes ?


BTW, here is more common divide the codes in 2 parts, as example 16-850, speaking, instead 16-8-50, like you do ;).
(maybe just cause in Italian is considered correct both say "ottocentocinquanta" and "otto-e-cinquanta", in colloquial words, for mean 850 :p)
 
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G Fourty

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I'm eighteen-six-fifty as well. Easiest for me. I had no ideas about the two sets of numbers and what they meant tho, so thanks! You learn something every day..

-Greg
 
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Aha, so the last digit specifies the form factor? What other numbers are used in place of the "0"? I'd think that it might begin to get slightly complex with different shapes. With a rectangular battery, you'd have to specify the base width and height, in addition to the length.
 

Cyparagon

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10440 is ten-four-fourty. The numbers are based on 10^3, hence 18,650 is 18 (thousand) six (hundred) fifty.
 
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The last digit does NOT mean a round cell. It is simply a decimal place. Take a 2032 battery expanded: 20 mm wide, and 3.2 mm high.
And I say eighteen-six fifty.
 

HIMNL9

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Sorry, but i have to say also this :p

With some guys at some electronic shops, i have to call them "those damn blue ones in the white box on the second shelf at your shoulders !"

:p :crackup: :eg:
 




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