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All the laser wavelengths

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your taking this off subject. this thread is not to discuss who neg repped who. stay on the topic just slightly if need be
 

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589nm is not yellow. It is more of a golden color. Yellow is 577nm.
Both 589, and 593.5nm are both labeled as yellow.

By definition, any laser <590nm is yellow. This is why 593.5nm is not considered a true yellow, and when 589nm was developed in 2010, they were calling it the first "true yellow" laser pointer.

If you don't know what you're talking about, don't say it.
 
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Well it's not necessarily lasers that beginners will buy but so that they can learn all the wavelengths and/or have a place to check them so that they know what others are talking about when people talk about a specific color/wavelength
 
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I just use logic though. I mean it's not that hard. Under 532 is blue/violet and 532-600 is yellow/green and 600 and above starts getting red.
 
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I just use logic though. I mean it's not that hard. Under 532 is blue/violet and 532-600 is yellow/green and 600 and above starts getting red.
515 is blue/violet?
600 is yellow?

Can we get some order here?

The quote from Sam was the most accurate, by far, compared to anything I've seen in this thread. The OP is second.

There is very little generalization you can put to wavelengths outside of 10nm increments. Only difference would be the >635nm spectrum. As these look similar to our eyes, as do <430nm. Simply because it's on the edge of our visible spectrum.

It could just be that I frequently see WL's in the 589-632 spectrum, but they are very different from each other.
 

ZRaffleticket

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<430nm - violet
430nm - 490nm - blue
490nm - 505nm - cyan
505nm - 550nm - green
550nm - 570nm - chartreuse
570nm - 590nm - yellow
590nm - 630nm - orange
>630nm - red

BOOM.
 
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bloompyle you know what i mean. i just shortened. i know most wavelengths by heart. my system is alot longer then that.
 

SKeeZ

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bloom has seen more wavelengths than all of us (at least when concerning lasers)
 

Cyparagon

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This list is futile. Diodes could be binned to all sorts of different wavelengths. I've had a 650nm diode at 667nm, I've had a 405nm at 417nm and I've had a 520nm at 511nm. They are all over the map and I think you're wasting your time trying to list them all.
 

Hap

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The point is to just list all the colors you can get as pointers/modules for people just getting into lasers. That's why I have pictures of all the colors.
Hehe :yh: This thread turned into something more then just listing different wavelengths!
 

zyxwv99

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589nm still looks like a gold orange I've owned 589nm personally. But I guess all of our eyes are different. Just like how some can see 808nm while some can't.
Are there actually people who can't see 808nm? If so, can you tell me anything about them? Color blind? Elderly? Just regular people?

The reason I'm asking is that for the last 4 or 5 months I've been collecting research papers on human ability to see near-infrared, near-uv, x-rays, gamma rays, particle radiation (beta, mesons, cosmic) and anything else that can elicit a visual response (a blow to the head, direct video feed to the brain).

There is a huge variation in human ability to see ultraviolet, strongly correlated to age and total lifetime exposure to uv. For example, most people under 30 can see uv down to 310nm (with some visual acuity) but people older than 50 usually can't.

I've never heard of any such individual variation in the near-ir, especially at such a low wavelength. If you have more info, I would like to know more.

:drool:
 
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Tell you what I'm taking apart a green ebay laser. I'll let you know if I can see the light from the IR diode.
 

NO4H99

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Are there actually people who can't see 808nm? If so, can you tell me anything about them? Color blind? Elderly? Just regular people?

The reason I'm asking is that for the last 4 or 5 months I've been collecting research papers on human ability to see near-infrared, near-uv, x-rays, gamma rays, particle radiation (beta, mesons, cosmic) and anything else that can elicit a visual response (a blow to the head, direct video feed to the brain).

There is a huge variation in human ability to see ultraviolet, strongly correlated to age and total lifetime exposure to uv. For example, most people under 30 can see uv down to 310nm (with some visual acuity) but people older than 50 usually can't.

I've never heard of any such individual variation in the near-ir, especially at such a low wavelength. If you have more info, I would like to know more.

:drool:
Don't know about uv light, but i see a 405 beam very, very easily (400mw looks almost as bright as 100 of green). On the other side of the spectrum, I have a hard time with a 600mw 635 beam.
 

Hap

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Tell you what I'm taking apart a green ebay laser. I'll let you know if I can see the light from the IR diode.
Make sure you don't aim the laser at you're face :)

If you can't see it, use you're camera Hint: it will see the IR.
 




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