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Video for Your Critique

XM360

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Hello All,

You may or may not know of me. I previously uploaded YouTube videos under the channel "XM360" on YouTube. I have fallen off on my uploading since taking on a full-time marketing job, but this quarantine has given me a lot of free time so I've decided to reinvest in YouTube. My XM360 channel was gaming-centered with laser uploads here and there, though many of my laser videos, especially the earlier ones did not put the proper focus on eyewear and safety. I've decided to make an entirely new laser-only channel and put a greater deal of focus on eyewear and safety, as well as accuracy of information. I'll be re-doing many of my old videos and slowly taking down the old ones. Along with conveying proper safety recommendations, I also wanted to pass videos by LPF members every now and then to ensure I didn't make any incorrect points. I just created the video below, a very brief overview of wavelengths as it relates to lasers. If you have the time, I'd love to hear your thoughts. I'm certainly not an expert but really try to use YouTube as a platform to bridge the gap between individuals just discovering the hobby, and you folks here. Thanks

Here is the draft video:
 



Cyparagon

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It's correct, but quite scattered, verbose, and repetitive. This could be a 1-2 minute explanation.
 

XM360

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It's correct, but quite scattered, verbose, and repetitive. This could be a 1-2 minute explanation.
I understand what you mean; you make a good point. I've gone back and cut the three or four reiterations I had in there, though I can only shave off close to a minute. I could shave off another minute and twenty seconds if I removed the wavelength examples section, though I really wanted to give some visuals for the various wavelengths hobbyists might consider buying. As for the scattered comment, I think the five topics flow better now:

Light is waves of energy → Wavelength of waves is measured in nm and determines color → All wavelengths make up the electromagnetic spectrum with 400nm to 700nm being the visible spectrum → Examples of laser wavelengths in the visible spectrum → Peak visibility of 555nm

Here is the shortened video which I hope is a bitter better:
 

XM360

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If nobody else sees anything I could correct or alter, I’ll move forward with publishing this tomorrow. I appreciate anyone who took the time to watch through it!
 

Snecho

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Hey XM, great to see you back! I literally saw you log in the day before this post and knew you were up to something ;)

It's interesting you made a new channel as I'm going to miss the main one. I guess this means you'll upload gaming there again?

Your video is very nice and thorough. Can't wait to see it up buddy.
 

XM360

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Hey XM, great to see you back! I literally saw you log in the day before this post and knew you were up to something ;)

It's interesting you made a new channel as I'm going to miss the main one. I guess this means you'll upload gaming there again?

Your video is very nice and thorough. Can't wait to see it up buddy.
Really appreciate you saying that, it means a lot! I’m gonna try to do gaming on the old one again if I can find the time. Thanks for watching :)
 

CurtisOliver

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Peak visibility is for 555nm only during photopic conditions. 507nm is the scotopic peak. 555nm is often mistaken for the brightest wavelength but that isn't entirely true. 507nm is technically the brightest we can perceive any frequency of light. I can elaborate further if needed.
 

Snecho

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Peak visibility is for 555nm only during photopic conditions. 507nm is the scotopic peak. 555nm is often mistaken for the brightest wavelength but that isn't entirely true. 507nm is technically the brightest we can perceive any frequency of light. I can elaborate further if needed.
Oh yeah, 555nm is basically the brightest in light and just in overall conditions but 507nm is brightest when your eyes are conformed to the dark.

Spectral sensitivity.
 

CurtisOliver

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Its one of the reasons why we perceive 532nm so bright as it retains its luminosity across different light levels. Here is a quick table for reference

lm/W507nm532nm555nm
Photopic303.46346604.42932683.00000
Scotopic1700.00001327.70000683.40000
 

XM360

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Peak visibility is for 555nm only during photopic conditions. 507nm is the scotopic peak. 555nm is often mistaken for the brightest wavelength but that isn't entirely true. 507nm is technically the brightest we can perceive any frequency of light. I can elaborate further if needed.
I must admit I was not aware of this, and will certainly reword that section. So as I understand it, 555nm would be peak visibility in light conditions (day) and 507nm would be peak visibility in dark conditions (night)? And 532nm retains visibility in both conditions because of its placement between the two peaks?
 

CurtisOliver

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Yes. So put simply green wavelengths are the brightest part of the spectrum.
 

Snecho

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Yes. So put simply green wavelengths are the brightest part of the spectrum.
Pretty much yeah. Spectral sensitivity makes things a lot more complicated for sure.

What I find interesting is technically a 1W+ 505-507nm at night would be the holy grail of lasers.

But ah, whatever.
 

CurtisOliver

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Yes, that would definitely appear bright. Would love to see 1W of that wavelength. 1000mw of 507nm would be like 1280mW of 532nm. So you wouldn't observe too much of a difference as at those luminosities bright is bright. But the beam would amazing
 
Last edited:

Snecho

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Oh I forgot to mention, XM, you said you'll be redoing your old videos and uploading them to the new channel.

Are you completely redoing them as I thought you sold most of your lasers some time ago?
 

XM360

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Its one of the reasons why we perceive 532nm so bright as it retains its luminosity across different light levels. Here is a quick table for reference

lm/W507nm532nm555nm
Photopic303.46346604.42932683.00000
Scotopic1700.00001327.70000683.40000
Draft #3 for your consideration, with scotopic and photopic explanation. Thank you for mentioning this as I feel that it is a great addition to the explanation. Here is the video:

Oh I forgot to mention, XM, you said you'll be redoing your old videos and uploading them to the new channel.

Are you completely redoing them as I thought you sold most of your lasers some time ago?
Some of the older ones yes, and I may just redo voice overs on some of the newer ones. I still have a good deal of lasers but I did sell off a few.
 

CurtisOliver

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Excellent. I’ll watch it later when I can play it with sound.
 




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