Welcome to Laser Pointer Forums - discuss green laser pointers, blue laser pointers, and all types of lasers



Laser Pointer Store

Using lasers to measure water level

Joined
Dec 26, 2007
Messages
6,333
Likes
161
Points
0
Use a rod that goes up with the increase of water which will obstruct the path of a horizontal laser line. When that rod gets too low it will stop obstructing it, thus changing the state of the sensor.

If you need a drawing let me know.

This will work only if you can add something into the tank besides water.
 

lasersbee

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2008
Messages
17,447
Likes
1,554
Points
113
Use a rod that goes up with the increase of water which will obstruct the path of a horizontal laser line. When that rod gets too low it will stop obstructing it, thus changing the state of the sensor.

If you need a drawing let me know.

This will work only if you can add something into the tank besides water.
Yeah... niko...

All you need is a float....

That is the about the simplest/cleanest solution using a Laser/Detector pair
to detect a predetermined water level... I like it..

When all else fails use the principle of KISS...;)

Jerry
 
Joined
Mar 28, 2009
Messages
145
Likes
2
Points
0
The KISS-Principle: Something I never quite mastered, I have to say...

Never mind, if it works, it should do it, and the simpler the better. Unless the inside of the tank is sealed, this is our best bet.

Now all we need is the thread starter to chime back in :D
 

briankeys

New member
Joined
Sep 12, 2008
Messages
32
Likes
0
Points
0
I am not a physics major or a university student and appreciate applying lasers to measure the quantity of water in a container....

However.. I'm just curious. Could you use a float on top of the water to reflect back the beam? or measure the deviation in vertical position of a float on top of the water using a laser?

edit: here I am feeling smart, when two posts above me a float is mentioned. :)
 

JLodge

New member
Joined
Jul 10, 2014
Messages
1
Likes
0
Points
0
It sounds like you are over-complicating things. If you are trying to build a sensor for personal use and are on a tight time schedule, you may want to consider just buying it. Not only will this save you time, but it will likely save you stress, and possibly even money (not wasting materials for something that may end up not even working).

One option is a water level sensor here: http://vegetronix.com/Products/AquaPlumb/

This sensor is relatively cheap, and it is supposed to be highly accurate. Although I admire you for trying to build a DIY project, I find that it is sometimes just easier to let someone else do the taxing work.

Hope this helps!
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jan 8, 2013
Messages
54
Likes
4
Points
0
Laser ................. Light Sensor

Tank
|--------------------------------|
|--------------------------------|
|--------------------------------|
|--------------------------------|
| Water\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ |
|--------------------------------|

The laser is in a fixed position in the top left corner.
The laser shines down at an angle, the light sensor reads the reflated light.
 




Top