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Uranium Glass

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Alaskan

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I had found some information on those rods too, and yes, had to be cooled to very low temperatures. I'm just hoping uranium glass might produce a few mere milliwatts of light I can collimate regardless of not being practical or having the characteristics we normally seek for such. I suppose a small amount of collimated light can be had in a cavity with many things, if you pump enough light into it, some of it will end up being usable, even if a very very low efficiency. Just wanting to try it, I don't have even moderate expectations, I do have some small hope though.
 



paul1598419

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Yeah, I was afraid of that. I personally didn't see a way forward to using U238 glass as a laser medium. And, of course heat concerns would always be a part of the problem.
 

Alaskan

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Although I have some uranium glass, I guess the real question for this thread isn't whether the glow from "uranium" glass can be collimated to some amount of output when put in a cavity, but whether any substance which has a broadband fluorescence can be put into a cavity to get some amount of collimated output and how efficiently. .1%, .01, less?

RCB that uranium marble oscillator is wild, I want to understand what they did, just using cell phone for internet, not able to look much deeper into it right now.
 
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paul1598419

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That ring looks like they have the marble in the middle with some UV LEDs in a circle around it that move in a circular motion around the periphery. It has a clip lead on it so the circuit is probably not part of the ring and so the ring can't be worn. Too bad, as it was a cute idea.
 

Alaskan

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I saw a second video of the circuit a few min ago, aha! Regarding spectometers, I wonder if there are any uber high end units which have the resolution to be able to see the individual wavelengths in that hay stack of uranium glass output or whether they are too intense and on top of one another to distingush them individually.
 

paul1598419

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If there were individual lines in the haystack, my spectrometer has the resolution to see them. It looks like a continuous light from the fluorescence of the U238 in the glass. You would see this same kind of light from anything that fluoresces. No transition lines, just light in a mixture of colors. If I point it at an LED light bulb, it has some peaks and some larger areas of light. I take it that this is from fluorescence as well.

Currently the way my spectrometer is set up it has 0.26nm per pixel. It s capable of 0.1nm per pixel, but I would have to limit the bandwidth to 445nm to 650nm. It is close enough to get almost 4 pixels per nm.
 
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Alaskan

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Far more resolution than I thought we could get from something you and I could buy, nice.
 

diachi

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If I point it at an LED light bulb, it has some peaks and some larger areas of light. I take it that this is from fluorescence as well.
Yes, white LEDs use a blue emitter and a yellow phosphor to achieve white. Either a GYR phosphor or just a straight yellow phosphor, looking at the spectrograph data would tell you which.
 

paul1598419

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The 405nm laser on the U glass marble seem pretty much identical. I didn't try the 450nm, though.
 

Cyparagon

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I didn't try the 450nm, though.
I knew the fluorescence intensity would decrease with a higher wavelength. Notice how the blue's fluorescence is smaller proportion of the excitation source. I was just curious if the spectrum would change - it doesn't.
 
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Alaskan

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Nice find, do I understand correctly that vaseline glass is U:phosphate uranium doped glass?
 
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