Welcome to Laser Pointer Forums - discuss green laser pointers, blue laser pointers, and all types of lasers



Laser Pointer Store

UNBIASED!!!

Wetto

New member
Joined
Sep 21, 2007
Messages
5
Likes
0
Points
0
This is not much but so far my experience( and my only one so far) is when I ordered my core it arrived very scratched and the dragon case had some big scratches.
 

amkdeath

New member
Joined
Oct 28, 2007
Messages
2,631
Likes
31
Points
0
sorry timelord, but your text under ur UFO pic is biased....

It says don't buy from wicked lasers, ull get robbed.

Sorry to be offending don't ban me for saying ur thing is biased just saw that and thought it belonged here..
 

c0ldshadow

LPF Founder / Admin
Staff member
LPF Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 17, 2006
Messages
2,820
Likes
333
Points
83
what makes this forum unbiased is that you can say what you want about companies. naturally, everyone is going to have their own opinion about what companies are good and bad. just because somebody happens to think a company is good or bad doesn't make them biased.

this forum is not associated with a particular company. it is independent. it is not owned by a laser company or related to one

this forum is unbiased in that you are allowed to say what you want about laser companies - unlike at LC where you will get banned for talking about other laser companies

so all in all unbiased means that this forum is independent of all laser companies, and that you can say what you want about other companies, good or bad, without content of your post being edited, outright deleted, or getting banned
 
T

timelord

Guest
Thanks for having my back c0ld ;) My opinion of Wicked lasers is mean't to provoke the right reaction and hopefully educate newbies from getting taken in by that blasted company for overpriced lasers.
amkdeath your opinion is noted and just as valid as mine ;)
ps nice danasoft signature too :D
 
Joined
Feb 17, 2009
Messages
5
Likes
1
Points
0
Welcome to the happiness frenzy, now peaking at a Barnes & Noble near you: Last year 4,000 books were published on happiness, while a mere 50 books on the topic were released in 2000. The most popular class at Harvard University is about positive psychology, and at least 100 other universities offer similar courses. Happiness workshops for the post-collegiate set abound, and each day "life coaches" promising bliss to potential clients hang out their shingles.
In the late 1990s, psychologist Martin Seligman of the University of Pennsylvania exhorted colleagues to scrutinize optimal moods with the same intensity with which they had for so long studied pathologies: We'd never learn about full human functioning unless we knew as much about mental wellness as we do about mental illness. A new generation of psychologists built up a respectable body of research on positive character traits and Happiness-boosting practices. At the same time, developments in neuroscience provided new clues to what makes us happy and what that looks like in the brain. Not to be outdone, behavioral economists piled on research subverting the classical premise that people always make rational choices that increase their well-being. We're lousy at predicting what makes us happy, they found.
It wasn't enough that an array of academic strands came together, sparking a slew of insights into the sunny side of life. Self-appointed experts jumped on the Happiness bandwagon. A shallow sea of yellow smiley faces, self-help gurus, and purveyors of kitchen-table wisdom have strip-mined the science, extracted a lot of fool's gold, and stormed the marketplace with guarantees to annihilate your worry, stress, anguish, dejection, and even ennui. Once and
 
Joined
Feb 17, 2009
Messages
5
Likes
1
Points
0
Welcome to the happiness frenzy, now peaking at a Barnes & Noble near you: Last year 4,000 books were published on happiness, while a mere 50 books on the topic were released in 2000. The most popular class at Harvard University is about positive psychology, and at least 100 other universities offer similar courses. Happiness workshops for the post-collegiate set abound, and each day "life coaches" promising bliss to potential clients hang out their shingles.
In the late 1990s, psychologist Martin Seligman of the University of Pennsylvania exhorted colleagues to scrutinize optimal moods with the same intensity with which they had for so long studied pathologies: We'd never learn about full human functioning unless we knew as much about mental wellness as we do about mental illness. A new generation of psychologists built up a respectable body of research on positive character traits and Happiness-boosting practices. At the same time, developments in neuroscience provided new clues to what makes us happy and what that looks like in the brain. Not to be outdone, behavioral economists piled on research subverting the classical premise that people always make rational choices that increase their well-being. We're lousy at predicting what makes us happy, they found.
It wasn't enough that an array of academic strands came together, sparking a slew of insights into the sunny side of life. Self-appointed experts jumped on the Happiness bandwagon. A shallow sea of yellow smiley faces, self-help gurus, and purveyors of kitchen-table wisdom have strip-mined the science, extracted a lot of fool's gold, and stormed the marketplace with guarantees to annihilate your worry, stress, anguish, dejection, and even ennui. Once and for all! All it takes is a little gratitude. Or maybe a lot.
 




Top