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Testing Laser Safety Glasses

WizardG

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May 9, 2011
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The projector in your clock is using a blue LED, not a laser. If you really want to test your safety glasses you're going to need to invest in a laser power meter or find a friend on the forum that will test your glasses for you.
 



Unown (WILD)

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Oh I know I was just pointing out why you couldn't determine the effectiveness of the goggles by that means
 

Sowee7

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Feb 1, 2021
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I thought that the forum consensus was 'Eagle Pair'...???
I’ve had a really bad experience with my eagle pair laser glasses, they don’t block the wavelengths advertised. my glasses were supposed to block 190-540 + 800-1700 but they can’t even block a tested 5mw 532nm dpss, and they let 5mw in from a 100mw 532nm laser, and they are rated OD6
 

bostjan

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Dec 29, 2011
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The most certain way to test them, and this only works once, is to wear them whilst doing your experiments. If you permanently go blind, then you know 100% for sure that the glasses didn't work.

There are lots of other much much safer ways to test, but no test is 100% accurate. I'd recommend using an LPM and using the actual laser source you are using, but again, if you don't have good glasses to use that source, it sort of leaves you in a pickle.

If you have a lower power laser light source that you know for sure is the same wavelength, you could shine it on a neutral wall and then test whether you can see the reflected dot with the glasses on. If so, then odds are high that the glasses won't protect you. There is a chance that the wall could be fluorescent at that wavelength, though, but, if it is, there is also a chance that other test objects might do the same and provide another form of optical hazard. But anyway, assuming that you cannot see the light reflected off of the wall from a <5mW source, you could use one pair of the glasses to test the other pair with the LPM and intended source. There'd still be a risk, but you are mitigating your risk. I mean, there is always some danger when using a high powered laser, even if you wear the best glasses, since the glasses could break or fall of your head or light could come in through a gap or you could trip and fall down and land on a pile of knives, who knows. The point of safety glasses is not to offer you 100% protection from danger, it is to mitigate the danger the best way possible.
 

AquaticHarpy

Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Messages
92
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8
If youre too broke to play with green lasers like me,


Get these, they work spectacularly, I have the same ones. I play mostly with 405-450 nm lasers, 50w+. They also protect me from my 636 arrays very well. So stay in the wavelengths, dont play with greens and these are some of the best you can get <3
 

Mathewe

New member
Joined
Oct 3, 2021
Messages
28
Points
3
The most certain way to test them, and this only works once, is to wear them whilst doing your experiments. If you permanently go blind, then you know 100% for sure that the glasses didn't work.

There are lots of other much much safer ways to test, but no test is 100% accurate. I'd recommend using an LPM and using the actual laser source you are using, but again, if you don't have good glasses to use that source, it sort of leaves you in a pickle.

If you have a lower power laser light source that you know for sure is the same wavelength, you could shine it on a neutral wall and then test whether you can see the reflected dot with the glasses on. If so, then odds are high that the glasses won't protect you. There is a chance that the wall could be fluorescent at that wavelength, though, but, if it is, there is also a chance that other test objects might do the same and provide another form of optical hazard. But anyway, assuming that you cannot see the light reflected off of the wall from a <5mW source, you could use one pair of the glasses to test the other pair with the LPM and intended source. There'd still be a risk, but you are mitigating your risk. I mean, there is always some danger when using a high powered laser, even if you wear the best glasses, since the glasses could break or fall of your head or light could come in through a gap or you could trip and fall down and land on a pile of knives, who knows. The point of safety glasses is not to offer you 100% protection from danger, it is to mitigate the danger the best way possible.
This is the 'BEST' response that I have so far read! "I tip my hat to you, bostjan!" Very informative and 'STRAIGHT' to the point! This is 'EXACTLY' what I've been looking for! I can easily relate to your response 110%. The line of work that I am in (not laser related) is quite dangerous and requires considerable safety precautions and training, however. Just as you stated, in your post... accidents still happen, injuries occur, and the best laid plans in safety are not always guaranteed. The best practices implemented for safety are simply measures designed to help 'mitigate' the danger and potential injuries that can occur!

Prior to reading 'your' post, I was under the impression that some sources of retail safety eye protection were really good, while others were not so good. I was trying to sort that out in order to insure that the glasses I chose to wear were truly safe as advertised. It didn't take long for me to feel like I was chasing a 'Red-Herring' in pursuit of what was truly safe. Now that I'm reading that 'nothing' is 100% safe, in laser safety glasses, I can finally get my head around the safety thing and also know how to better protect myself from the 'reality' of it all!
Huge thanks for making things clear to me!!!
 




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