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Super wide-beam laser

paul1598419

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Too bad they don't list the average optical power. It is likely 200 mW or less with a beam expander on the end. Can't say what might be the output power on a direct diode one.
 

Alaskan

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But half as much as these sold for a few years ago. I've been wondering if they could be upgraded with a higher output laser diode :)
 

paul1598419

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Since they don't mention optical power at all, it is anyone's guess. One would hope that with the increase in price would come an increase in power, but since they stay away from those specs, I kind of doubt it.
 

Alaskan

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They don't mention it, but I've seen other listings for the same model number which indicated 50 mw.

Edit: Be careful buying these green laser flashlights on eBay, I just noticed some of them are knock off's, the one I linked to is probably a China knock-off of a China product, terrible... no wonder the price is half.
 
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paul1598419

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I never buy green laser flashlights, period. But, I do get what you are saying.
 

steve001

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This? https://www.ebay.com/itm/High-Power-Long-Distance-Laser-Genetics-ND3-x40-Green-Laser-Designator-w-Mounts/261588930154

I believe this might be the DPSS model, I believe the "Subzero" model has a laser diode in it to make it stable in cold operating environments, but when I search for that model on eBay, they list it as 532 nm, which I believe the sellers have wrong, should be 520 nm, or close to that if a direct to wavelength diode.
That device you've linked to has been available for sometime. It's used by hunters... According to the site it is 532 nm and the output <18mW. The 532 nm subzero model likely uses a heating element. YouTube has a number of video reviews.
 
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Alaskan

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When did I indicate they were new? I’ve been watching these on ebay for years now, tempted, but not for the 150 dollar knock offs.

Their web site doesn’t say they use a heater, not sure they didn’t make a diode model in the past or not, saw that claim once, right now they indicate 532 nm.
 
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steve001

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When did I indicate they were new? I’ve been watching these on ebay for years now, tempted, but not for the 150 dollar knock offs.

Their web site doesn’t say they use a heater, not sure they didn’t make a diode model in the past or not, saw that claim once, right now they indicate 532 nm.
Well I wasn't saying you didn't know. I provided some info you did not seem to know or make clear you did. I assume the subzero unit requires a heating element or else this laser won't work
 

adam1128

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Hi guys,

Thanks again for all the help. So to test the idea of this diffuse, wide beam laser that IU can use as a (safe!) flashlight for my computer vision algorithms to pick up, I was looking to get a laser. I had seen this:

https://www.laserpointerpro.com/5-in-1-100mw-532nm-midopen-kaleidoscopic-green-laser-pointer-pen-p-308.html

Does that look like a sensible choice? Is it too powerful? I need it to ideally be reasonably powerful, so it's still bright once diffused - but I absolutely don't want it to be dangerous (in the diffused state at least - I understand that 100mw when focussed is dangerous).

then to make it diffuse, either

1. Try it's own unfocusing capabilities
2. Remove the focussing lens
3. Turn the focussing lens around
4. Add a diffuser lens

I'm happy to try all of these. One question is: which of these (if any) will make the beam safe (i.e. not a risk of eye damage?).

I've read this:

https://www.cnet.com/news/why-lasers-are-the-future-of-projectors/

It describes how laser cinema projectors turn a powerful laser beam into diffuse light that is safe. It says:

"Epson says safety is not an issue. "The laser passes through a phosphor/diffuser wheel. Light from the projection lens complies with the class 2 safety standard, and is in accordance with other laser projectors. There is no risk of retina damage, unless users intentionally stare into the lens directly for prolonged periods."

and

"The fact is, by the time the light leaves the lens (actually, well before that), it's no longer a coherent beam. So it's still bright, but not focused. It'd be no worse than staring at any seriously bright light (which, to be fair, isn't a, ahem, bright idea anyway)."

That all sounds great. Is it accurate? And if so, that's what I want to do: turn a powerful laser beam (from the pointer above) into a bright, diffuse high divergence flashlight that isn't dangerous to your retina. Am I on the right track, or would you guys suggest doing something different?

Thanks,
Adam
 

diachi

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Feb 22, 2008
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Hi guys,

Thanks again for all the help. So to test the idea of this diffuse, wide beam laser that IU can use as a (safe!) flashlight for my computer vision algorithms to pick up, I was looking to get a laser. I had seen this:

https://www.laserpointerpro.com/5-in-1-100mw-532nm-midopen-kaleidoscopic-green-laser-pointer-pen-p-308.html

Does that look like a sensible choice? Is it too powerful? I need it to ideally be reasonably powerful, so it's still bright once diffused - but I absolutely don't want it to be dangerous (in the diffused state at least - I understand that 100mw when focussed is dangerous).

then to make it diffuse, either

1. Try it's own unfocusing capabilities
2. Remove the focussing lens
3. Turn the focussing lens around
4. Add a diffuser lens

I'm happy to try all of these. One question is: which of these (if any) will make the beam safe (i.e. not a risk of eye damage?).

I've read this:

https://www.cnet.com/news/why-lasers-are-the-future-of-projectors/

It describes how laser cinema projectors turn a powerful laser beam into diffuse light that is safe. It says:

"Epson says safety is not an issue. "The laser passes through a phosphor/diffuser wheel. Light from the projection lens complies with the class 2 safety standard, and is in accordance with other laser projectors. There is no risk of retina damage, unless users intentionally stare into the lens directly for prolonged periods."

and

"The fact is, by the time the light leaves the lens (actually, well before that), it's no longer a coherent beam. So it's still bright, but not focused. It'd be no worse than staring at any seriously bright light (which, to be fair, isn't a, ahem, bright idea anyway)."

That all sounds great. Is it accurate? And if so, that's what I want to do: turn a powerful laser beam (from the pointer above) into a bright, diffuse high divergence flashlight that isn't dangerous to your retina. Am I on the right track, or would you guys suggest doing something different?

Thanks,
Adam

Avoid LaserPointerPro.

https://laserpointerforums.com/f41/guide-company-should-i-buy-97936.html
 

steve001

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Joined
Jun 3, 2007
Messages
2,193
Points
83
Hi guys,

Thanks again for all the help. So to test the idea of this diffuse, wide beam laser that IU can use as a (safe!) flashlight for my computer vision algorithms to pick up, I was looking to get a laser. I had seen this:

https://www.laserpointerpro.com/5-in-1-100mw-532nm-midopen-kaleidoscopic-green-laser-pointer-pen-p-308.html

Does that look like a sensible choice? Is it too powerful? I need it to ideally be reasonably powerful, so it's still bright once diffused - but I absolutely don't want it to be dangerous (in the diffused state at least - I understand that 100mw when focussed is dangerous).

then to make it diffuse, either

1. Try it's own unfocusing capabilities
2. Remove the focussing lens
3. Turn the focussing lens around
4. Add a diffuser lens

I'm happy to try all of these. One question is: which of these (if any) will make the beam safe (i.e. not a risk of eye damage?).

I've read this:

https://www.cnet.com/news/why-lasers-are-the-future-of-projectors/

It describes how laser cinema projectors turn a powerful laser beam into diffuse light that is safe. It says:

"Epson says safety is not an issue. "The laser passes through a phosphor/diffuser wheel. Light from the projection lens complies with the class 2 safety standard, and is in accordance with other laser projectors. There is no risk of retina damage, unless users intentionally stare into the lens directly for prolonged periods."

and

"The fact is, by the time the light leaves the lens (actually, well before that), it's no longer a coherent beam. So it's still bright, but not focused. It'd be no worse than staring at any seriously bright light (which, to be fair, isn't a, ahem, bright idea anyway)."

That all sounds great. Is it accurate? And if so, that's what I want to do: turn a powerful laser beam (from the pointer above) into a bright, diffuse high divergence flashlight that isn't dangerous to your retina. Am I on the right track, or would you guys suggest doing something different?

Thanks,
Adam
We've answered your questions. Now it's time for some fun so experiment. Report what you find.
 

paul1598419

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Messages
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Do not buy from LaserPointerPro. They are overpriced, under spec and cheap crap. It is rare that anyone around here even refers to something they sell. It is also true that all your questions have been answered, several times. Time to either do more research or get started on your project.
 

goonmad

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Jan 3, 2019
Messages
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Here are a couple of different designators: An ND3x50 and a new 500mW prototype. (sorry for the crappy pics)
 

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