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Spectral Emission line DB

paul1598419

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It's the damnedest thing, but went to take some beam shots of this very yellow beam and they all come out greenish. I don't see a trace of green in it, but my damned Cannon does. :(
 
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Agastar

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It's the damnedest thing, but went to take some beam shots of this very yellow beam and they all come out greenish. I don't see a trace of green in it, but my damned Cannon does. :(
Sounds like a color correction issue :) Are you working with the raw format or some other like JPG? I wonder what it would look like through a diffraction grating?

Speaking of diffraction gratings, I took my Argon gas discharge lamp and took a picture of it with one of those cheap 1000 l/mm gratings you find on ebay and amazon (the ones that look like they go in an old slide projector). I put the grating up to my phone camera and took a picture, it looks really cool!
 

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paul1598419

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Don't need to run it through a diffraction grating as I used my Ocean Optics USB2000+ spectrometer and it was a single narrow peak at 573.9nm. I have rounded up to 574nm for the sake of my signature. I suspect it is in the way camera detectors try to imitate single wavelengths by using combinations of red and green. It is a flawed system that works well in most cases in nature to provide colors from just three primary colors mixed in various combinations.
 

Agastar

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Don't need to run it through a diffraction grating as I used my Ocean Optics USB2000+ spectrometer and it was a single narrow peak at 573.9nm. I have rounded up to 574nm for the sake of my signature. I suspect it is in the way camera detectors try to imitate single wavelengths by using combinations of red and green. It is a flawed system that works well in most cases in nature to provide colors from just three primary colors mixed in various combinations.
Yeah, that make sense :) I had a Canon 30D back in the day, what canon do you have?
 







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