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o-like Ultrafire and O-like module review

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J/K, i'm only wondering one thing, about that label ..... assuming that, as any normal person, you keep it in front of you, for read it, when you're looking at it, you're just looking also inside the output beam hole ..... LOL !
lol exactly why I said not the smartest :)
 

Fazor

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Hey Matrixcs, I'm thinking about ordering the 50mw laser... do you think I need safety goggles with this laser? I'm assuming the 100mw would definately need saftey goggles... but I'm hoping the 50mw is more safe to look at. Or... are the both safe? Thanks.
 

matrixcs

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Hey Matrixcs, I'm thinking about ordering the 50mw laser... do you think I need safety goggles with this laser? I'm assuming the 100mw would definately need saftey goggles... but I'm hoping the 50mw is more safe to look at. Or... are the both safe? Thanks.
im not using any safety goggles... just avoid having it reflected back to you.. but yes if you need protection i encourage you to buy one...
 

HIMNL9

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@ Fazor : basically, any laser over 5 mW, is dangerous enough for retina, mainly cause the reaction time of your eye (the time that it need for "blink" when hit from a high light for reflex) is long enough for let pass enough energy for damage the retina, with these powers (careful, this don't mean that 5 mW pointers are not dangerous, but with 5 or less mW, usually the quantity of light that pass before the "blink", is enough for "flash" temporarily your sight, but not for burn the retina ...... if you intentionally look directly a beam without close the eye, also just a milliwatt, you get some damage also from this)

The question is how you use the laser, and this only you can answer ..... if you use it with care, trying to never point at mirrors or shining objects, and never look into it, you can also not use goggles (anyway, consider that accidents always can happens :p) ..... if instead you plan to use it in places where there are reflecting surfaces, at eyes highness, or where there is always a good probability of undesired reflections, and don't have the time for take care about all this, then yes, the goggles are highly recommended.
 

matrixcs

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@ Fazor : basically, any laser over 5 mW, is dangerous enough for retina, mainly cause the reaction time of your eye (the time that it need for "blink" when hit from a high light for reflex) is long enough for let pass enough energy for damage the retina, with these powers (careful, this don't mean that 5 mW pointers are not dangerous, but with 5 or less mW, usually the quantity of light that pass before the "blink", is enough for "flash" temporarily your sight, but not for burn the retina ...... if you intentionally look directly a beam without close the eye, also just a milliwatt, you get some damage also from this)

The question is how you use the laser, and this only you can answer ..... if you use it with care, trying to never point at mirrors or shining objects, and never look into it, you can also not use goggles (anyway, consider that accidents always can happens :p) ..... if instead you plan to use it in places where there are reflecting surfaces, at eyes highness, or where there is always a good probability of undesired reflections, and don't have the time for take care about all this, then yes, the goggles are highly recommended.
well said my friend heheheh. so far i haven;t met one accident thats because i dont shine my green laser that often, i only use it to shine during the night sky... Or if there is a power interruption during night time here in the Philippines, i would entertain people by shinning it and using a diffraction addon... heheehe
 

Fazor

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Thanks for the replys. Yeah, I don't plan on being an idiot with my laser :) I'll definitely never look at it directly, or even come close to shining anyone in the eyes. But I do want to play around with it in my room and outside sky. I guess I'm concerned about my room... I don't want to burn anything! How close do objects need to be to the lasers for it to burn. Like at 15 feet... will I burn my rug? This is why I'm guessing the 50 is better for me than the 100. I want to use it in my room without burning anything.

Also, I understand that a mirror will reflect the laser back at your, but other shiny objects will also? Like a TV screen? A wood floor? Bathroom tiles? Will all these surfaces reflect a dangerous amount that if it even hits your eye for a second will blind you? Sorry for the newb questions :)

But I do want a sweet solid beam. I'm hoping the 50mw does the trick + provide more safety than the 100mw.
 

HIMNL9

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Burning things, with a 50mW, is matter of focus, more than distance ..... anyway, the commercial ones, usually, don't have a focused point, so for burn things are not good.

Anyway, check the beam, if you can do it in fog or smoke, for find if there's a focus point in the beam ..... as in the pic.

 

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Fazor

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Interesting. I would have never guessed that... I would have thought the closer to the laser the more powerful. I learned something new today :)

So is it possible that my focus point could be 10 or more feet? From what I've seen on video's of burning, it seems to be inches from the laser.

There has got to be some kind of power decrease with distance though right... like at 1000 feet away a laser can't be as strong as 1 foot can it?

ps... i should be ordering my laser today as soon as my paypal funds transfer!
 

takirasan

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Burning things, with a 50mW, is matter of focus, more than distance ..... anyway, the commercial ones, usually, don't have a focused point, so for burn things are not good.

Anyway, check the beam, if you can do it in fog or smoke, for find if there's a focus point in the beam ..... as in the pic.

Thanks
 
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FYI also if this laser is anything like the 50mw version I have in the same housing, which I'm guessing it is. It does not have an IR blocking filter. If I put an R-72 filter on my camera the dot is still visible quite visible in near-IR.

Here's the R-72 transmission chart:

http://www.pbase.com/image/25744262.jpg
 
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