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Morons with Drones.........




Nexgen

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That’s totally safety issue, I saw a video of drone crashing into plane’s winglet. They should really think what they are doing and what are the risks of such behavior.
 

paul1598419

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This was taken in some country outside of what is considered the west. It was stupid and dangerous and people travelling abroad should be aware that such things happen. If it had happened here, that drone would have been confiscated and its operator arrested.
 

Benm

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Is this actual drone footage, or just filmed from a high vantage point on land?

If it is a drone this is complete madness, it could have easily struck the aircraft or simply be sucked in by one of the engine resulting in who knows what damage.

I'm inclined to think that this video was not filmed with a drone though: although i cannot see the zoom level, it looks like it's getting -very- close to that A380, but remains very stable in position. I would expect it to be at least shaking and moving to retain it's position in the blastwave after the airplane flew past.
 

paul1598419

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I tend to think it was a drone as the altitude changes in the video. I was watching for that as it looked stationary to me at first too. But, it looks like an expensive larger drone to me by the altitude changes.
 

RB astro

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Just saw this, this morning.
...
Jerry
Yeah Jerry, I saw it come up on one of my feeds yesterday too and couldn't believe the stupidity.
Not only is it dangerous act, endangering hundreds of lives but it also puts the hobby of drones into a worse public perception than it already is (and I don't blame the public actually).
This is idiotic.
Why are all the hobbies we like, getting harder to enjoy, arghhh ????

This was taken in some country outside of what is considered the west. It was stupid and dangerous and people travelling abroad should be aware that such things happen. If it had happened here, that drone would have been confiscated and its operator arrested.
Is this actual drone footage, or just filmed from a high vantage point on land?
I tend to think it was a drone as the altitude changes in the video. I was watching for that as it looked stationary to me at first too. But, it looks like an expensive larger drone to me by the altitude changes.
Yes, this was taken with a drone and it was on the island of Mauritius.
The drone is not a DJI drone, it's a newly released drone from Parrot called The Anafi.
Unlike DJI drones, the Parrot Anafi does not come equipped with Geofencing capabilities.
This is one of the safety feature of the DJI drones where it is programmed into the drone's firmware/software and app, not to be able to take off within a certain distance from all major airports around the world.
Also includes all other sensitive and classified areas globally.
For instance, DJI does not allow takeoffs in the Washington D.C. area at all.

Unfortunately, other companies don't implement such measures.
Another reason DJI is at the cutting edge of their game.
IMO the DJI drones are unsurpassed for quality and safety.

Of course, idiots will be idiots, as we all know, just look at our laser hobby.

:mad:

RB
 

lasersbee

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Is this actual drone footage, or just filmed from a high vantage point on land?

If it is a drone this is complete madness, it could have easily struck the aircraft or simply be sucked in by one of the engine resulting in who knows what damage.

I'm inclined to think that this video was not filmed with a drone though: although i cannot see the zoom level, it looks like it's getting -very- close to that A380, but remains very stable in position. I would expect it to be at least shaking and moving to retain it's position in the blastwave after the airplane flew past.
^^^^ Like He said ^^^^^
It is actual Drone footage from a Parrot Anafi
Drone.

Jerry
 
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Benm

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Darn, that's actually not a small drone either, 320 grams it says.

Big jet engines are designed to deal with ingesting birds of that weight and a fair bit larger, but i imagine there are some materials in a drone that are a lot harder than chicken.

If it got ingested into an engine the (financial) damage would be huge in case of an A380. With a twin engine jet it could even pose a serious safety risk - they fly okay on one engine, but having one fail whilst just taking off is pretty bad.

And they seem to get pretty close to that airplane too - so even a collision would be possible. If the engines don't ingest it, it could easily strike a important control surface like the rudder or vertical stabilizer.

It's hard to tell the exact distance, but it certainly seems close enough to be classified as a 'near miss' from an aviation perspective. I hope they find and prosecute the person responsible for doing this. I certainly would not be comfortable on that plane knowing it'll fly that close to a drone on takeoff.
 

lasersbee

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The Motors are made of metal.
I wouldn't want to be hit by one or 4
of them going the speed of a plane.

Jerry
 

paul1598419

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That's true, but the aircraft is not at cruising speed just after take off. It would be much worse at 500 miles/hour. I'm guessing at the cruising speed, so if it is off, please don't jump down my throat.
 

Benm

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That's true, but the aircraft is not at cruising speed just after take off. It would be much worse at 500 miles/hour. I'm guessing at the cruising speed, so if it is off, please don't jump down my throat.
Well no, if there are no noise restrictions the engines of an aircraft actually spin at full power on takeoff. Since the air is fairly thick at sea level this does not mean maximum rpm's at all, but the problem is the speed of the -blades- when an engine ingests something.

It could be sitting at the start of the runway with zero ground speed when they ram the throttle up to almost full power when the drone is ingested. Safety wise this would not be that bad since the pilot would abort the takeoff, but the engine would sustain a lot of damage.

The point this drone comes closest to the aircraft is about the worst possible one really, it's just after takeoff, so certainly no chance of aborting takeoff any longer, but only very low altitude too so there are very little options when an engine fails.

This is a 4 engine jet that'll be okay running on 3, but on a twin engine get this would be very dangerous as they'd have half the thrust, and not nearly enough altitude to make a controlled flight back to the origin.

On a twin engine jet there are two places where an engine failure has the best chances of ending in a safe landing: still on the ground before V1, and as high in the sky as possible - the latter allowing maximum distance to limp back down to a nearby airfield. Depending on load flying with a single engine is a bit between powered flight and gliding: you definitely have more range than just gliding, but when heavy have cannot really gain or maintain altitude for long.
 

paul1598419

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I suppose it depends on what the engine can sustain in terms of damage if the drone managed to get in front of it and got pulled in. Jet engines have sustained damage from geese flying into their path, so an 11+ ounce drone would likely also. Of course I understand the turbine spins and pulls air into it. I wasn't saying under these circumstances that the engine would be better off. But at cruising speed the drone also has significant momentum into the turbine and this could very well cause more damage to it than at a lower speed.
 
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Benm

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I suspect that depends on what it actually hits. I most likely think it would just be sucked in and then be mangled either through the main engine or "just" the bypass blades (it can damage those but not get into the combustion chamber).

Of course it could also do something like ram into the cowling, dislodge part of that, and all that getting pulled though the engine possible resulted in even an uncontained malfunction, posing grave danger to other parts of the aircraft.

Also there is a lot more of data how engines fare after (even multiple) bird strikes - the results vary but complete failure isn't even that usual if its just one goose going through.

Drones are made from different stuff though: If i blendered a cooked chicken (with all bones in it) to a fine paste you could probable safely eat that. Blend-tec'ing a drone would probably result in something less digestible, also from a mechanical point of view.
 

paul1598419

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Keep in mind we are talking about 11+ ounces of mostly plastic at take off speeds, so dislodging a huge piece of the cowling seems unlikely. As far as being digestible, if it is ground up small enough and doesn't react with alimentary juices, it all just passes on through. Not a good metaphor. It would likely cause more damage to the cowling at cruising speeds I would think. It is all speculation what a strike at the engine would do. It may not have any effect at all, IDK.
 




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