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H

Hanshotfirst.kc

Guest
Had a shot or two...
One of them was glowing for some odd reason. :eek:
 

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H

Hanshotfirst.kc

Guest
Beam shot through a humidifier.
Aero-swiss (or something like that) ultrasonic humidifier. Great humidifier by the way. Can put about two gallons of water a day into my air.
 

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H

Hanshotfirst.kc

Guest
MarioMaster said:
try it with oil and get some florescence pics :)
Huh? What is this "oil" that you speak of? Surely in this age of regret of usage of fossil fuels, you do not speak of motor oil. Pray tell what oil this is that you desire?
Sorry, but I wasn't joking when I said I had a shot or two. More accurately, I had about 5 shots o' Sailor Jerry. ;D
 
H

Hanshotfirst.kc

Guest
Finally, an experiment of mine.
For the longest time, I've speculated that flame actually has a surface.  Not a surface like a table, mind you, but a surface that could be detected.  I've never done in depth research on the subject, so I can't claim that this is my original discovery...but, here is a shot of validation of my suspicion.  Laser light actually reflects off of the surface of a candle flame.
Note:  This is NOT what I witnessed in real time.  In actuality, the green of the laser was CLEARLY visible against the flame.  Additionally, it was clearly visible against ALL parts of the flame, from clear, blue, to yellow.
I need some advice on capturing this phenomenon photographically or on video.  I tried video with multiple settings, including NightShot, but got nothing.  This is the best image.  You can see a dot near the wick.  Believe me, (as much as you can a random person on the 'net  ::)) that the dot was NOT on the wick.

Edit:  in the pic, look just below the bright spot in the flame.  Small dot there is actually the beam hitting the flame.  I suspect this is like a mirage...heat changing the density of the air.  Alternatively, it could be the beam reflecting off of the combusting particles of paraffin before they turn into vapor.   But, I noticed the same effect on a flame from a butane lighter.  I suspect that it's most likely a reflection caused by a change in air density.

Edit 2: Just noticed that if you look closely, really closely, at the pic, you'll see two spots under the bright spot in the flame. One is entry point, and one is exit point.

I really need a better camera. :p
 

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Cyparagon

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The flame is just the wax in gas form during combustion. It has properties akin to a very light smoke, so in a sense it does have a surface. the surface is the transition between "air" and "wax in gas form." Much like the surface of water.
 

RA_pierce

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Yeah, like Cyparagon said... it's basically like boiling water. When it gets hot enough, it becomes a vapor and a beam is visible. Now someone explain to me why a flame from a butane lighter does not appear to have a 'surface.' Is it because the fuel (in normal air and room temperature) is already an invisible gas?
 

Zarniwoop

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Just tried some cooking oil. For me, canola oil looked about like most liquids. But olive oil did the orange/red thing - really strange. It also doesn't carry far into the liquid at all.
When I spread some out on paper, it didn't show orange - just when there's a drop or a pool.
 




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