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Lo-D Drivers

Hiemal

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Hey guys. I got some new fancy linear drivers for sale for you all to try out.


Because they ARE linear drivers, they do require a good deal of heatsinking when your output voltage differs heavily from the input. The closer the two are, the better (within 1 V is the best).


I currently have 4 in stock. They are adjustable from 330 mA to 3.3 amps. These are the newest design, with a blank PCB pad on the back for superior heatsinkability. This pad is connected to ground.

These drivers are fully tested across every different load range, from extremely low to extremely high. They sport thermal protection to protect the driver from overheating, which makes the output current drop until it reaches a certain equilibrium.


The dropout voltages on these boards ranges from 700 mV to 1 volt, depending on what kind of output voltage you're using. Output ripple is nonexistent. As said, they DO need good heatsinking. I have done testing on output spikes (using my test load, an LPC diode (and an oscilloscope) and the soft start is very noticeable on the o-scope.




They are $14 each, with $2 shipping in the CONUS.

If you need a lower/different current range feel free to send me a PM and I'll change a board to match what you need to the best of my ability.


Pictures;







 
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ped

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Re-sized & re-hosted your 219 Gigapixel image for you ;)

Ped
 
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Alaskan

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I might have made the wrong assumption, are these adjustable constant current regulators or voltage?
 

Hiemal

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No, they're constant current regulators. I wouldn't be selling them as laser diode drivers otherwise!
 

crazyspaz

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Too bad they are all gone- if you make a few more, send me a PM :)
Also, did you reflow those, or just hand solder them? A few pics make it looks like there is some missing solder and shorts. Just curious- not a hard problem to fix with an IC that big anyway :)
 

Alaskan

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OK, thanks. What is the lowest input voltage you observed they can be supplied to output 2.0 VDC at roughly 4 amps each?
 

Hiemal

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To supply that current at that voltage shouldn't be too problematic, a fully charged li-ion should do the trick just fine.


crazy- I did actually reflow these, but because they were the first iteration of these drivers they are a little messier than usual. The reason some look like they're missing caps/whatever is because I was doing some testing when I was taking those pics. The finished final boards have the proper stuff in all the places, no worries. And no shorts, I tested every board by hand. ;)

I actually found another regulator in the same class as the one I'm using, and they advertise it as an incredibly low 400 mV dropout at 5 amps, but the regulator is about $3.5 more expensive, and as such the driver's price would have to increase too if I used those instead.

But dang, that low dropout is ***y.

And I will be making more, it just might be a week or two before I can.
 
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Hiemal

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OP re-updated. I have one in stock currently, adjustable from 200 mA to max.
 

Kris

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I think this looks like exactly what I need.

Application:
Power a circuit of 12 infrared LEDs for Raspberry Pi infrared camera tinkering.

LED spec: 1.5V @ 100mA

I think I can do 3 strings of 4 LEDs each in parallel. Each series string of 4 would drop ~ 6Vdc, the 3 series strings would sum up to ~300mA.

Power = 4AA batteries.

Does that sound like your Lo-D driver would do the trick?

Thanks!
 
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Laser diode drivers make excellent LED
drivers. They are usually more expensive
and a bit of overkill, though. LEDs can
handle crazy current spikes. Heat is the
real enemy of an LED. I have no doubt that
the Lo-D would work VERY well in your
application.
 

Hiemal

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OP updated. 4 in stock with more potentially available depending on demand.
 




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